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Greetings and a Tamiya Primer question

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  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Thursday, August 27, 2020 11:17 PM

Welcome to the Forums!

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    August 2020
Posted by plastic4ever on Thursday, August 27, 2020 9:44 PM

Modeltruckbuilder
Perhaps you could try sanding the body with 600 or 800 grit and then re-shoot the primer. Give it a nice bath after sanding and let it dry thoroughly. I frequently wet sand Tamiya primer with 2000 grit before the color coats as well.
 

 

Good advice, which I plan to take. I have sanded the body and gotten the roughness out, so I need to apply at least one more Primer coat to get the finish sort of even. And a wet sanding and full cleaning before I tackle top coats. Which will be Vallejo Model Air through an airbrush, which seems to work pretty well. I picked up so many bad painting habits from building models back in the day, (and rushing through most of them) its almost like learning everything all over again. But that's okay, because seeing some of the models you guys turn out, it must be worth it!

  • Member since
    August 2020
Posted by plastic4ever on Thursday, August 27, 2020 9:39 PM

fox

Even using an airbrush could give you the same problem if held too far away from the model. The paint will start to dry before it gets on the model.

 

I agree with this theory - I think that plus high humidity might have been the gremlins. I tend to stand far away when using a spray can, an old habit I never quite got rid of.

  • Member since
    August 2020
Posted by plastic4ever on Thursday, August 27, 2020 9:36 PM

plasticjunkie

Sounds like spraying too far from the surface which will produce a rough texture. No need to remove it just use x fine wet sandpaper to smooth out and recoat if needed. You will get better control using an air brush than a rattle can.

 

Thanks for the advice. I think distance from the model might be a part of the problem. It did seem as if the primer was dry and particulated even as it hit the plastic.

I actually did have fairly good luck sanding the rough parts down and the body is pretty slick right now. The roughest parts were quite easy to sand, almost chalk-like.

And I agree with you re: airbrushing, as I've had really good luck with Stynylrez through an airbrush. I thought I could save some clean-up time by using a can, but apparently the Plastics Gods do not agree!

  • Member since
    August 2020
Posted by plastic4ever on Thursday, August 27, 2020 9:31 PM

Thanks for your prompt reply! I know that Tamiya Primer is considered one of the best, from a can at least, so I know its me and not the paint! But the inconsistency of my failures in this regard really baffles me.

  • Member since
    August 2015
Posted by Modeltruckbuilder on Thursday, August 27, 2020 9:00 PM
Perhaps you could try sanding the body with 600 or 800 grit and then re-shoot the primer. Give it a nice bath after sanding and let it dry thoroughly. I frequently wet sand Tamiya primer with 2000 grit before the color coats as well.
fox
  • Member since
    January 2007
  • From: Narvon, Pa.
Posted by fox on Thursday, August 27, 2020 8:46 PM

All of the answers given above are spot on. The guys put them down before I got a chance to. I agree with all of them. Even using an airbrush could give you the same problem if held too far away from the model. The paint will start to dry before it gets on the model. The name of the game is practice, practice, practice. I also agree that the painting section of the forums is the place to go for any painting problems.

Keep at it and if you need any help, just ask. That's what we're here for.

Jim Captain

Stay Safe.

 

 Main WIP: 

   On the Bench:  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 70% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Thursday, August 27, 2020 7:57 PM

Sounds like spraying too far from the surface which will produce a rough texture. No need to remove it just use x fine wet sandpaper to smooth out and recoat if needed. You will get better control using an air brush than a rattle can.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Thursday, August 27, 2020 7:51 PM

Welcome Plastic4ever. I also use the Tamiya primer, but have not had this problem. Prior to using a rattle can I always set it in a bowl of warm water for 5 minutes beforehand. I agree with the others though and recommend that you run this through the paint forum.

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Thursday, August 27, 2020 3:06 PM

Welcome aboard.I have not had that problem.I use the Tamiya Primers all the time,so I can't be of much help.

You know,if you noticed the Forum has different sections, way down at the bottom,there is a section for Painting Questions, you might want to ask down there and save this one for intros 

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, August 27, 2020 2:57 PM

Welcome to the forum!

I use Tamiya Fine Surface Primer and I've never had that problem.  But you might want to have a look down in the Painting forum and see if anyone else has had the same experience.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    August 2020
Greetings and a Tamiya Primer question
Posted by plastic4ever on Thursday, August 27, 2020 9:38 AM

Howdy. New to the forum, but I have been building plastic models 4ever. Mostly SF vehicles, some cars. Call me an “Old Newbie?”

 

 

Although I’ve been at the hobby pretty much my whole life, I am continually frustrated in my attempts to improve my paint jobs. If I get a decent one, and use the same techniques or materials again, the next time it comes out crummy. So I am definitely missing something.

 

Today, I used Tamiya Fine White Primer on a car body, and on certain portions of the body it looks like sandpaper, I mean really rough. I’ve used the same primer before with good results, but I’ve also wrecked a couple of models by getting that super-rough finish, and trying to remove it with paint cleaner. (I won’t do that again, believe me!)

 

So what makes for an extremely rough primer coat? Not enough layers? Too many layers? High humidity? Bad ***? I painted it outside, warm day, new can of primer, body was carefully washed beforehand. I think the humidity was high, though. I did several light coats, and I figure something is up because the finish is extremely uneven, some areas being almost good, and others being awful.

 

I’m resigned to letting it dry and trying to sand it down to something usable, but it’s not a good sign for this model. I always have decent luck with Testors gray primer, but that tends to go on very thick, covering some details, so I thought I’d try to get better at using the Tamiya Fine Primer, which shows the detail much better - on a good day.

 

My best primer jobs, honestly, have been the ones where I shot Stynylrez through an airbrush, so I might end up going back to that, although I like the ease of just using a rattle can.

 

I bet this is an extremely common problem, that you guys figured out a million years ago, but if any of you would be so kind as to enlighten a very old newbie what I am doing wrong, it would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

 

 

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