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Japan's 'deadliest night' remembered

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  • Member since
    July 2008
  • From: Vancouver, the "wet coast"
Japan's 'deadliest night' remembered
Posted by castelnuovo on Tuesday, March 10, 2015 7:08 PM

It is the 70-th anniversary of the bombing of Tokyo. Go to bbc.com and enter the title of this tread and there will be a 3 min video. What I found strange that it is so swept under the rug, no monument like for Hiroshima or Nagasaki,, all very hush-hush.

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, March 10, 2015 7:17 PM

I was not so much "swept under the rug" as opposed to eclipsed by the other battles of that time, both before and after the Tokyo fire raids. Spring 1945 was the climax of so many epic campaigns and battles in Europe and the Pacific. The raids are quite well documented in the histories of the air war against Japan. And while more deadly and devastating than either atomic bombing, the dramatic impact of  "one bomb from one plan and a city is destroyed", is more well remembered nowadays.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    June 2013
  • From: Jax, FL
Posted by Viejo on Tuesday, March 10, 2015 7:42 PM
Go to amazon and look for MISSION TO TOKYO by Robert F. Dorr. Excellent book about that very raid.

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Gordon D. King on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 10:35 PM

This bombing was not buried or kept "hush hush.  It is well mentioned in many books about the war against Japan. "Mission to Tokyo" is one of  the most detailed books. The were many raids. The fire bombing on  March 8, 1945 leveled 16 square miles of the city and destroyed an estimated 267,000 buildings. The raid also destroyed 18 percent of the industrial area of the city. It was carried out by 340 bombers with incendiaries flying as low as 4,500 feet. Other books which detail the raids include "Japan's War" by Edwin P. Hoyt and "Eagle Against the Sun" by Ronald H. Spector

  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: St louis
Posted by Raualduke on Thursday, March 12, 2015 3:06 AM

They actually thought about attaching incindearys to bats .Tokyo was made mostly of wood

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Thursday, March 12, 2015 8:08 PM

I just finished reading Flags of Our Fathers.  If memory serves, the bombing of Tokyo occurred during the fight for Iwo Jima and may have been overshadowed by the flag raising.  

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, March 12, 2015 11:43 PM

Operation Meetinghouse was on March 8-9. The flag raising on Iwo was February 23.

That bombing raid certainly was probably one of the most horrible moments in human history.

Please understand I would be insane to find fault in what was a surreal episode in history, but we all collectively never want to have to see that again.

On a lighter note, some years ago my family was on vacation in a small town up in Northern California called Boonville. I mean small, too.

Being sociable folk, we went to the trivia night at the local hotel, bar and restaurant.

Somewhat surprising, but when you live in a place like Boonville you spend a LOT of time online, so the competition was really good.

Lot of locals.

We made it to the final question tied with two other groups.

"How many soldiers raised the flag on Mount Suribachi?"

"Six" was the general answer.

"None" I say. "They were Marines".

Well all hell breaks loose and they truly don't know what to do.

"Take it to the bar" I suggest.

"Goddam right, Semper Fi" a few of the local scholars opine.

Steak dinners on the house, and a bunch of new friends.

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, March 13, 2015 5:24 PM

I read a Reuters or AP article on this same subject the day before this post was originally made. My impression from that article was that it was in Japan for the "hush hush/swept away" perception was from the survivors. They feel their suffering was equal if not worse than the atomic bombings, yet at the same time not acknowledged in their own history as such.

As has been shown here, in the west, these raids are no secret at all. They are just as well documented and written about as their equivalents in Europe such as the fire raids on Hamburg in 1943 or Dresden in 1945. Japan's reflections on their own WWII history is quite interesting when viewed from any other country and still a source of much animosity and contention in Asia today.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, March 13, 2015 11:46 PM

Back in 1984 I went from Japan to Hong Kong. I was held up for 4 hours at the customs dock because of my previous visa in Japan.

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

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