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How difficult it is to REALLY fly an airplane?

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  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 3:35 PM

I've sat next to some of my friends in the cockpit. They get pretty serious.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 2:49 PM

How easy is it? I don't know. Try for yourself. LOL!

  • Member since
    August 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Sunday, June 21, 2015 9:49 AM

Funny Thing - Flying that is :

Even after my prior comments I still lean back in my recliner and remember the times that all that training and practice never readied me for .There were times flying to Europe That I would see the most gorgeous sunrises and flying the other way smackingly beautiful sunsets .

     This is a side effect I will never forget !

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, June 18, 2015 8:23 AM

patrick206

Flying is easy.

One: The number of arrivals should match the number of departures.

....

Patrick

Depends on whether you count each bounce as a seperate arrival :-)

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Thursday, June 18, 2015 1:42 AM

stikpusher

HAAAAHHHAHAHAHAAAAHHHAAAA!!! That's a good one!! I was wondering how long before you weighed in, stik! Funny stuff!

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Tamiya 1/32nd Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zeke For Japanese Group Build

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    March 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 5:09 PM

Flying is easy.

One: The number of arrivals should match the number of departures.

Two: 24 hours between bottle and throttle.

Three: When I was a young Flight Engineer and wasn't sure about something, I only had to look to my left and there were the Captain and First Officer, they would help.

When I was a young First Officer and wasn't sure about something, I only had to look to my left and there was the Captain, he would help.

When I was a young Captain and wasn't sure about something, if I looked to my left, there was my reflection in the side window. All crew members are there for a purpose, talk it out, work as a team.

Four: If you can't taxi off the runway even with full power, you forgot to lower the landing gear.

Five: The basic flying principles are so simple. You just pull back on the stick to go up, keep pulling back to go down.

Patrick

  • Member since
    October 2006
  • From: Tucson, AZ
Posted by Archangel Shooter on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 3:58 PM

So easy even a caveman can do it....just watch that the earth doesn't smack you coming down.

 Your image is loading...

 On the bench: So many hanger queens.

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by modelcrazy on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 9:28 AM

Good point GH.

I used to own a 150 myself. Cheep to own operate and maintain, especially since I was current with my A&P at the time.

Not much in the way of performance though, just fun.

Steve

Building a kit from your stash is like cutting a head off a Hydra, two more take it's place.

 

 

http://www.spamodeler.com/forum/

  • Member since
    August 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 9:06 AM

I enjoyed my time in the left seat and would go back to it in a heartbeat, but could not pass the medical anymore.

Pipers, not the old cubs and Tri-Pacers, might be nice aircraft, but as an old Cessna single guy, I have to ask- Have you ever seen a low wing bird?  And I mean the feathered version 1.0.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 8:29 AM

Well, yes, there is the boredom factor.  There is the old saying- "flying is hours and hours of boredom, mixed with moments of sheer terror."

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July 2008
  • From: Vancouver, the "wet coast"
Posted by castelnuovo on Monday, June 15, 2015 10:25 PM

Gentlemen, thank you for the insight, especially from the pilots. I was always wandering just how it is to be in the cockpit. I did take an intro flight 3 or so years ago in a Piper Cherokee. It was super cool, the instructor let me taxi the plane and take off, maneuver in the air, he only did the radio comm and the landing. But flying a big plane form many hours and for many years would be a very different ballgame and that is what I was curious about.

Thanks again and happy flying...

Cheers....

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Monday, June 15, 2015 9:11 PM

I heard any landing you can walk away from is a good landing.  Any landing where you can reuse the aircraft is a great landing.  

John

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, June 15, 2015 2:41 PM

"Because the sky, like the sea, is unforgiving"

Ft. Benning Blackhats.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    August 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Monday, June 15, 2015 2:24 PM

One more old saying that my instructor drilled into everyone until you were saying it in your sleep------"Two solid objects cannot occupy the same given space at the same given time, GRACEFULLY"  Operational word is "gracefully"

The reason behind the saying that "A midair can ruin the whole day".

BTW, when the wings fly faster than the aircraft you are in an inherantly unsafe craft..............

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, June 15, 2015 11:16 AM

My Dad ruined it for me. 48 years with UAL.

He called it a glorified bus drivers job.

Years of boredom punctuated by a few seconds of stark terror.

Guess he wanted me to stay out of the Air Force or something.

Still, wish I had tried it out.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    March 2007
  • From: Northeast WA State
Posted by armornut on Sunday, June 14, 2015 1:32 PM

I was a victim of Top Gun, not as a pilot but I knew I needed to be around planes. I had my first front seat EC-135 maintenance ride a few months back, rotorwings are WAY more fun than fixedwing. I was amazed at how little input from the pilot was required to keep the aircraft straight and level, autopilot was not used and we are equipped with FADEC so once we started producing torque we just thumped along, I agree with the idea of the crew being a team, though I was not the PIC I kept an eye open for traffic and was prepared to assist with what I could in the event of an emergency,my pilot never said yea or nea about it but he also never said he didn't want me on a maintenance flight again.

we're modelers it's what we do

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Sunday, June 14, 2015 10:48 AM

I cant speak for the Navy, but the Airforce has never had a pilot recruitment problem at all. just the opposite in fact. They often have a pilot retention problem though.

Money, home life, and flying are usually the main reasons.

I fly MUCH MUCH more in the airlines, I don't have to go on deployment, and get paid more.

Also at the airlines I don't have any thing else to do other than flying. In the military sometimes you would spend more time on your additional duty that actually flying. That was in the '80s but I imagine that it's still the way it is.

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Sunday, June 14, 2015 8:53 AM

Remember the days when Top Gun came out? I bet recruitment to join the U.S. Navy or Air Force went the roof with kids wanting to become the next Maverick.

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: MN
Posted by Nathan T on Saturday, June 13, 2015 11:55 PM

Shows like ice pilots and flying wild Alaska are the most rediculus reality shows ever to be on tv. From a real pilot's point of view that is...

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Saturday, June 13, 2015 6:59 PM

I began in '58, age 17. While in University that had several aviation related courses, (engineering, aerospace science, etc,) I did flight training along with class work. With commercial, instrument, multi eng. and instructor ratings completed before graduation, I had the opportunity to instruct in their training program and another flight school at a different airport. First airplane flown, Taylorcraft, I think  a 65 hp engine and wood prop, on a grass runway.

I knew the Selective Service Board would be sending me a congratulatory letter soon, fortunately I was able to enlist in an Army Nat'l Guard unit. The intent was to attend flight school, which did happen. Following training I rejoined my unit and settled into the routine, eventually becoming dual rated in fixed and rotary wing aircraft. Soon it was known that there was a rather serious pilot shortage in the commercial airline industry. I sent in resumes, several sent applications and soon enough I had three to choose from.

First assignment, flight engineer on 727, then 707. Shortly I could advance to First Officer on the 727, next the DC-10, then the 747. Now to the back of the Captain line, seated again in the 727. Proceeding through the seniority system, I went from the three holer to the 757, DC-10, 747-200, then retired on the 747-400 after 33 years and sum total of 26K hours, including 23 years reserve military.

Where this all leads to is, flying will never be safe as long as you have to drive to the airport. I literally was exposed to MUCH more danger while driving, than in all of my career. Commercial flight is so professional, a mature industry and they eliminate all of the risk they can, then aggressively manage the risks they simply must live with, such as weather, aircraft mechanical issues and pilot personality traits. Some pilots fly as if they are fighting in combat, they are rough on equipment and fellow crew members, most unpleasant folks. Some pilots have yet to learn, that airplanes are indeed considered re-usable.

Once we began "Crew Environment Training," where we enforced standard crew actions in all of the situations encountered, during all phases of flights, things got considerably better. Gone were the days of macho egotists ruling the flight deck with an iron fist, the crew worked together in a co-operative spirit. The environment became as it should be, " a crew is a group of pilots working together."

Then with the advent of advanced engines, avionics, satellite navigation, flight director systems and all around better airplanes, the work load became easier, instrument approaches became just a cinch. As it has always been and I'm sure will always be, complacency, lack of attention and substandard judgement skills will exist and must always be guarded against, but overall I found the job to be fascinating, satisfying, rewarding and just plain fun.

My standard was to make sure that I knew for certain that the weather at departure point, en route and at destination was at the very least above minimal requirements, the aircraft was in full compliance with dispatch, alternate needs met, etc. To allow unacceptable risk into your decision making process, is to accept the chance of becoming part of a smoking hole in the ground. Never thought of that as anything inviting.

I would advise anyone starting a flying career, if you mainly want excitement, take up robbing banks. The days of macho swagger, fearless self image and bravado are hopefully gone for good.

I recall a poster displayed at an Army Flight School break room, "maintain thy airspeed, lest the Earth shall rise up and smite thee." Picture was of an old Curtis Jenny, perched in a tree. It didn't get there on it's own.

Patrick  

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Saturday, June 13, 2015 6:29 PM

See what I did there?!!!Stick out tongue

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Saturday, June 13, 2015 6:28 PM

fermis

stikpusher

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Saturday, June 13, 2015 6:27 PM

stikpusher

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Saturday, June 13, 2015 6:27 PM

stikpusher

To all the pilots on here who fly the rest of us around

  • Member since
    December 2011
Posted by Chrisk-k on Saturday, June 13, 2015 4:41 PM

Depends.  Flying like a WWII ace must be very hard.

Iwata HP-CS | Iwata HP-CR | Iwata HP-M2 | H&S Evolution | Iwata Smart Jet + Sparmax Tank

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, June 13, 2015 4:27 PM

To all the pilots on here who fly the rest of us around

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: Houston, Texas
Posted by panzerpilot on Saturday, June 13, 2015 11:49 AM

It's definitely a lot easier if the plane has a good Otto Pilot

-Tom

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, June 12, 2015 11:49 PM

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: Houston, Texas
Posted by panzerpilot on Friday, June 12, 2015 11:00 PM

I've got somewhere around 15,000 hours and have been flying for 22 years.

There are countless variables to how laid back it is in the cockpit and how difficult it can be. Experience, weather, aircraft status, aircraft type etc. Experience is the leveler, however.

A lot of it also comes down to the person and the way they perceive things.

Personally, I like to fly with laid back, stable and calm people who are not arrogant. In my experience they are better pilots. They don't spend their time micromanaging everything and stressing themselves out so that 'when' things happen, they are already peaked.

Mach71 is right. Angry is bad and best reserved, hopefully, for drama on a TV show. Angry pilots are usually poor pilots, are likely overcompensating for something (fear, lack of skill, etc) and they isolate any help they may get in the cockpit. I do think those shows are sensationalized.

All in all, the job is really enjoyable. A lot of the stress is on the ground .

-Tom

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