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Favored side

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Favored side
Posted by seastallion53 on Thursday, June 11, 2020 11:47 PM

Just for fun,why is the port side of most fixed wing a/c throughout history the side where nose art and and getting on and off,in and out occure?

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Posted by Real G on Friday, June 12, 2020 12:08 AM

I think you just answered the question!  You have to have your nose art on the same side where you deplane.  It would be uncool to have to get off the ladder, go “wait wait wait”, and duck under the nose to get to the side with the nose art before getting your mug photographed.

But just to be annoying, the F-104 Starfighter canopy hinges on the port side.  Maybe Lockheed anticipated Japanese orders?

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Posted by goldhammer on Friday, June 12, 2020 12:10 AM

Pilot in command was usually on the left side.

Military courtesy says the senior officer is last on first off.

Good as explanation as any.

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Posted by Bish on Friday, June 12, 2020 2:04 AM

I seem to recall reading that the reason access to and from the cockpit is on that side is because thats the same side you get on and off a horse, and at the time aircraft where first taking to the air, the horse was still the most common form of transport.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

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Posted by Est.1961 on Friday, June 12, 2020 2:40 AM

Bish

I seem to recall reading that the reason access to and from the cockpit is on that side is because thats the same side you get on and off a horse, and at the time aircraft where first taking to the air, the horse was still the most common form of transport.

 

That was the first thought that came to my mind, I think it is one of the reasons we drive on the left over here, also the Knights of old carried their swords and shields on the left side made getting on and off a horse a whole lot easier. 

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Posted by seastallion53 on Friday, June 12, 2020 2:45 AM

Iguess that makes sence.

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  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Friday, June 12, 2020 5:34 AM

Est.1961

 

 
Bish

I seem to recall reading that the reason access to and from the cockpit is on that side is because thats the same side you get on and off a horse, and at the time aircraft where first taking to the air, the horse was still the most common form of transport.

 

 

 

That was the first thought that came to my mind, I think it is one of the reasons we drive on the left over here, also the Knights of old carried their swords and shields on the left side made getting on and off a horse a whole lot easier. 

 

Correct, though it goes back further as its believed that the Romans always traveled on the left. And your right about the driving as well.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Academy 1/35th Warrior FV511

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Posted by Tojo72 on Friday, June 12, 2020 6:33 AM

Because the plane looks better on the shelf facing to the left

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Posted by seastallion53 on Friday, June 12, 2020 7:56 AM

Good answer:)

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Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, June 12, 2020 8:16 AM

Bish

I seem to recall reading that the reason access to and from the cockpit is on that side is because thats the same side you get on and off a horse, and at the time aircraft where first taking to the air, the horse was still the most common form of transport.

 

Ditto

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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Posted by modelcrazy on Friday, June 12, 2020 8:21 AM

Maybe because you board and deboard a ship on the "Port" side, the side that faces the port or dock.

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Posted by armornut on Friday, June 12, 2020 9:02 AM

   Sorry MC, when we boarded or debarked our carrier we went down the starboard side.

   Angle deck overhung to far to make port side docking impractical. Really can't speak for tin cans or subs though.

we're modelers it's what we do

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Posted by seastallion53 on Friday, June 12, 2020 9:22 AM
The LPDs I was on used the port side to embark and debark so I guess that point is mute :)
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Posted by modelcrazy on Friday, June 12, 2020 9:34 AM

armornut

   Sorry MC, when we boarded or debarked our carrier we went down the starboard side.

   Angle deck overhung to far to make port side docking impractical. Really can't speak for tin cans or subs though.

 

Yeah, our cutter would tie up on either side depending on what was already in dock. I think it's just tradition at this point. But I believe that is why the left side is called "port".

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Posted by Gamera on Friday, June 12, 2020 10:07 AM

As I remember ancient ships had the rudder on the right side. Most people being right-handed you stood facing the bow and moved the tiller with your right hand. 

So they ended up docked on the left or portside to keep from damaging the rudder on the right. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

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Posted by armornut on Friday, June 12, 2020 10:48 AM

   Sounds logical. I sometimes like these questions that don't have an immediate solid answer.

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Posted by disastermaster on Friday, June 12, 2020 10:56 AM

Don Stauffer
Bish

I seem to recall reading that the reason access to and from the cockpit is on that side is because thats the same side you get on and off a horse, and at the time aircraft where first taking to the air, the horse was still the most common form of transport.

 http://cs.finescale.com/emoticons/icon_smile_sign_ditto.gif

 

http://www.laie-smileys.com/chocala.gif  http://www.laie-smileys.com/chocala.gif

    Double ditto that....

https://i.imgur.com/Gcc59Dk.png

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Posted by Tanker-Builder on Friday, June 12, 2020 1:17 PM

Ah Yes;

    The old Port side, Starboard side question. Well , those of you who have gotten it right will know, because of what I am going to say. In the very,very days of old, all steering was done with the Steering Oar or Board on the right side of the ship or vessel.

    I don't recall when this became the standard, but I expect it was during the Norse age. All the Steering oars or boards were on the right. I guess there weren't to many Sountpaws back then. But! As to Tin Cans and other ships, by then it didn't matter because the rudders were under the ships and all, except Carriers could tie up either side. Some carrier's Overhangs were to massive to allow one or the other side to be used. 

    We, on the Midway were always not sure we could go through the Panama Canal because of water conditions in the Gatun Locks and Lake. Our overhang on the slanted ( Port) side came awful close to the " Mules" when the lock emptied!

      There is a painting in Ireland that shows St.Brendan in his coracle and his steering oar is on the right! The Steersman on a Viking Ship always looked through the sunstone facing slightly to the right as it was easier to see over the sail that way.

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Posted by GMorrison on Friday, June 12, 2020 1:23 PM

In the US locomotive engineers sit on the right.

IIRC US military helicopter pilots sit on the right?

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

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Posted by scottrc on Friday, June 12, 2020 1:35 PM

But isn't "Port" a relatively new term?  Left was Larboard, the opposite of Starboard.  I agree about the right handed theory, especially with helming, horsmanship and sword drawing.

Another point I want to make is that many small civil aircraft only have an acess door on the right side.  Piper Cub, Cherokee, some models of the Mooney.  

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Posted by ikar01 on Friday, June 12, 2020 6:02 PM

On the two copters I flew on in the A.F. the pilot was always ion the left.  On trash haulers and other types of multi engine aircraft it was the same thing, left side, pilot. Another exception was the U-2.  I wouild watch the pilot get in on the right side under that metal canopy they used.

I do think I remember some WII aircraft wouild put theirpersonal markings on the left side, but it could also be on both sides for some reason.

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Posted by seastallion53 on Friday, June 12, 2020 7:21 PM

In my aircrew experience in the NAVY the helo command pilot was always in the right seat.Was the AF different?

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  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Friday, June 12, 2020 10:48 PM

Maybe, or it could be the aircraft itself.  For copters I have only flown in two, the H-43 Pedro and a Huey.  I never got into the Jolly Green or the Super Jolly Green.

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Posted by Eaglecash867 on Saturday, June 13, 2020 5:32 AM

Bish

I seem to recall reading that the reason access to and from the cockpit is on that side is because thats the same side you get on and off a horse, and at the time aircraft where first taking to the air, the horse was still the most common form of transport.

 

Yup!  That's why.  The way some older aircraft are set up, such as the Hawker Sea Fury, getting into the aircraft is exactly the same as climbing onto a horse.  One of the aircraft I take care of the avionics on is a Sea Fury TMK20, and when its owner/operator was training me on it, he gave me the history lesson as well.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

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Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, June 13, 2020 8:58 AM

modelcrazy

Maybe because you board and deboard a ship on the "Port" side, the side that faces the port or dock.

 

And in the early days, the rudder (steerboard/starboard) hung from the aft right quarter, not the stern. You would risk damaging the rudder if you tied up to a dock/wharf with the right side of the ship.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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Posted by armornut on Saturday, June 13, 2020 10:02 AM

   Modelcrazy, found your posted link most enlightening, really cool. Thank you.

we're modelers it's what we do

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  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Saturday, June 13, 2020 11:32 AM

Yes!"G" 

  You noticed that too? I always wondered about that. Now, some of my Buds that work for U.P. cannot find out why this is so. All they get is " Well, That's the way they Build them"

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Posted by Tanker-Builder on Saturday, June 13, 2020 11:36 AM

Hi Scottrc;

   Yeah, I noticed that when I bought my Cessna 180 Years ago. This was the first aircraft that had a door on the left. My Pipers had the right handed door. So did a Beech I rented for a while.

 That said I guess we'll never really know about Planes will we? Even Tank drivers sit on the Left!

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Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, June 13, 2020 11:53 AM

Tanker-Builder

Yes!"G" 

  You noticed that too? I always wondered about that. Now, some of my Buds that work for U.P. cannot find out why this is so. All they get is " Well, That's the way they Build them"

 

I would assume it so that the engineer can look back down the platform.

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

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