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Tomato plants -- herbicide poisoning

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  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, June 16, 2020 3:54 PM

The crows go after my berries. I have no problem shooting them with the pellet gun.

We keep them under a mesh cage, but that cuts down on visits from the pollenators too, so I open it when I'm out there.

 

Bill

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Tuesday, June 16, 2020 2:08 PM

I do not tolerate rabbits. They are destructive animals. Last winter they ate the lower bark off of a $1,500 Japanese Maple. Of course, the tree died.

I have 6 humane traps in my garden at all times. Loaded to the max with rabbit bait. Last week I caught four rabbits, three newborns and an adult. First I paint their behinds with orange paint, then I release them in a forest preserve about five miles from my house. I paint their behinds so I know if they return. Last night I saw  two more rabbits in my backyard (they did not have orange behinds). They are dumb animals, so they will probably be trapped by tomorrow.

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Tuesday, June 16, 2020 1:11 PM

I learned the hard way not to spray bad stuff anywhere close to something it could hurt. Sorry about your tomatoes. At least it's early enough to get more started. 

My problem so far this year with tomatoes has been aphids. I've tried spraying a couple of applications of soap and cayenne mixture. I'm hoping not to have to resort to anything stronger. My strawberries are a lost cause though. At least the neighborhood rabbits are fatter for my efforts.

Cary

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, June 16, 2020 12:54 PM

40-75, foggy often. Toms, no way.

roses barely.

artichokes plenty.

beets, onions, carrots,leeks, strawberries.

Broccoli types

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Tuesday, June 16, 2020 11:41 AM

Ah OK, I get it.  I have a guava tree that does the same thing. I used to wonder why the grass never grew around the “drip line” of the tree.  A friend’s father-in-law authored a guide to plants in Hawaii, and after reading it, I learned why.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Tuesday, June 16, 2020 10:38 AM

DasBeav

I found out a few years ago Black Walmut trees and tomato plants do not get along. Should of read a book. I had to move the garden a bit....Bang HeadBang HeadBang Head

 

The roots of a Black Walnut Tree produce a natural herbicide. The tree does this to kill competing plants from growing within 50 feet of it's trunk. This provides more water and nutrients for the tree's roots to absorb. Mother Nature is a wonderful thing.

  • Member since
    July 2018
  • From: The Deep Woods
Posted by Tickmagnet on Tuesday, June 16, 2020 6:30 AM

Vinegar works well on weeds but if you live where you have a very nicely manicured lawn you would end up with brown spots from the vinegar. But, your tomatos would still be kicking.

 

 

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Monday, June 15, 2020 11:58 PM

Walnut trees and tomato vines don’t mix?  Chemical incompatibility?  The tomatoes keep asking for more sunlight?

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=JnC88xBPkkc

That tomato horn worm is a beautiful creature - too bad it’s essentially just a crawling stomach that is always hungry!

 

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    October 2016
  • From: Somewhere in Ohio...
Posted by DasBeav on Monday, June 15, 2020 11:28 PM

I found out a few years ago Black Walmut trees and tomato plants do not get along. Should of read a book. I had to move the garden a bit....Bang HeadBang HeadBang Head

 Sooner Born...Buckeye Bred.

 

  • Member since
    April 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Monday, June 15, 2020 8:41 PM

Yeah I have a hard time keeping tomato plants alive due to heat, bugs, and critters that steal the few tomatoes that ripen on the vine. My jalapeños however always grow in abundance.

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/144 Revell Snowberry

On deck: 1/48 Tamiya Fw 190A4

In the hole: 1/48 Hasegawa Fw 190A4

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Monday, June 15, 2020 7:03 PM

Real G

Hmmm...  I have that same effect on any desirable plant if I get within 20 feet of them.

Sorry about the loss of your tomato plants.  Mine got wiped out by leaf miners before succumbing to insecticide.  Sad 

 

That's too bad about the leaf miners. Tomatos are the most difficult garden plants to grow. They are affected by so many things: virus, fungus, blight, insects, blossom drop, blossom end rot, etc. How about this monster:

This is the tomato hornworm. It is about the size of a cigar and will defoliate a plant in a single day. I drop them into a bucket and then dump them into a sewer.

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Monday, June 15, 2020 6:43 PM

Hmmm...  I have that same effect on any desirable plant if I get within 20 feet of them.

Sorry about the loss of your tomato plants.  Mine got wiped out by leaf miners before succumbing to insecticide.  Sad 

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Tomato plants -- herbicide poisoning
Posted by JohnnyK on Monday, June 15, 2020 5:52 PM

I would guess that many of us plant tomato plants in the summer. This is a word of warning, even small amounts of herbicides (0.1 ppm), containing 2, 4-D will kill your tomato plants. I planted 12 tomato plants three weeks ago. Last week Monday I sprayed "Weed B Gone", which contains 2, 4-D, on my lawn about 20 feet from the tomato plants. The Weed B Gone mist must have drifted over to the tomato plants and killed them. See the photos below:

The leaves are tightly curled and bent over. The plants will not recover from the hebicide and they will need to be removed and replaced. Lucky for me, it is early in the growing season and the replacement plants should still produce a crop this year.

 

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