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Aircraft Trivia Quiz

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  • Member since
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  • From: Carmel, CA
Posted by bondoman on Wednesday, April 27, 2011 9:58 AM

Because once the engineers had understood the Prandtl-Glauwert transformation, and calculated the Karman-Tsien Factor, they were still puzzled by the Alhambra effect and had to test the wing in a water tank.

Just a guess, but the water tank was needed to test high fraction Mach numbers.

  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Wednesday, April 27, 2011 2:07 PM

I'll accept that.

The problem was that when the F4U was designed, compressible flow was, if not terra incognita, definitely in the "here there be tygers" category. Yes, fluid dynamicists had some pretty mathematics, but the engineers kept building aircraft that crashed when they got too close to the Mach barrier (you don't have to go supersonic to get into trouble with the onset of compressibility).

What to do? Water tunnels existed, but (and this is where we get into that bit about testing in a "funny" way) the water tunnel (ship) model-makers were in the wrong union from the wind tunnel (aircraft) model-makers, and work demarcation was a BIG DEAL (think labor riot big deal).

So skating a little fancy (each card-carrying craft union was demanding 100% of the pie and was willing to strike to get it), a model F4U wing was constructed by the woodworkers salaried to build wind tunnel stuff AND an identical "bent" wing was built by the metalworkers paid to fabricate water tunnel testbeds. Workers in both unions got their money (which was the real basis of the dispute), and the compressibility danger zones were located and designed around.

So bondoman, the Trivia Quiz baton has been formally passed to YOU.

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

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Posted by F-8fanatic on Thursday, May 5, 2011 8:34 PM

hello, is this thing on??

 

(crickets....)

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  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Saturday, May 7, 2011 9:29 AM

F-8fanatic

hello, is this thing on??

Intermittently it would seem?

I think it's now in the first come, first served domain.

  • Member since
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  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Saturday, May 7, 2011 10:59 AM

What famous bombing raid had aircraft 'armed' with broomsticks?

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  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Saturday, May 7, 2011 11:03 AM

osher

What famous bombing raid had aircraft 'armed' with broomsticks?

The Jimmy Doolittle Raid, 18 April 1942

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

  • Member since
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  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Saturday, May 7, 2011 11:13 AM

And to keep this lob going: United Nations fliers called the Korean air combat zone "MiG Alley"; what did the communists call it?

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

  • Member since
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  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Monday, May 9, 2011 4:01 PM

 

As a guess:

Mig 골목 ??

Tom T Cowboy

 

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
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  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Monday, May 9, 2011 4:14 PM

West Yula River?

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

Recite the litanies, fire up the Gellar field, a poo storm is coming Hmm 

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  • Member since
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  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Monday, May 9, 2011 4:26 PM

Дай мне силу (literally, [God] give me strength!) Seriously, they did have a name for it, one that had NOTHING to do with either MiGs or F-86's, rather like the way Polish pilots refer to "The Chessboard" (Szachy pokład, I think) or French pilots talk about "The Hexagon" (L'hexagone). A good old earthy name, one you'll agree is quite appropriate the first time you hear it.

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

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  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Wednesday, May 11, 2011 12:03 AM

Okay, based on the tremendous (lack of) response, here's a (vocabulary building) hint: the area was allantoid. Make of it what you can.

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

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  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Thursday, May 12, 2011 12:48 AM

I have it on reasonable authority (one book, one combatant) that communist pilots referred to the air combat region as "The Sausage". Hopefully this map will help:

And "allantoid"? It means "sausage-shaped" (bet you didn't know that there was a word for "sausage-shaped" other than saying "sausage-shaped"!) Now somebody else can pose the next trivia question.

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

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  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Thursday, May 12, 2011 3:37 PM

Easy one, worlds oldest airport?

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

Recite the litanies, fire up the Gellar field, a poo storm is coming Hmm 

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  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Thursday, May 12, 2011 5:30 PM

I refuse to answer on the grounds that I like eating at the adjacent restaurant [DUH!].

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  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Thursday, May 12, 2011 5:47 PM

wheres the resturaunt? i cant find it anywhere near by.

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

Recite the litanies, fire up the Gellar field, a poo storm is coming Hmm 

My signature

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  • From: Carmel, CA
Posted by bondoman on Thursday, May 12, 2011 6:47 PM

what were you doin' in Marylin'?

My daughters latest theater gig is head wig dresser for "Hairspray".

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  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Thursday, May 12, 2011 7:18 PM

94th Aero Squadron Restaurant USED to be just across the footbridge from the museum. You had to be careful about closing time because the museum closed before the restaurant. I Googled the site just now and got an "OPERATIONS CURRENTLY CLOSED" banner. [Whatsacominago] I got myself in the mood to eat there. Now I'll have to go over to the Sir Walter Raleigh instead.

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

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  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Thursday, May 12, 2011 7:23 PM

lol both of you know where it is, neither of you have said what it is.

The whole area apart from the museum seems to be industrial stuff.

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

Recite the litanies, fire up the Gellar field, a poo storm is coming Hmm 

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  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Thursday, May 12, 2011 7:37 PM

Semi-private aside (between you, me, and what? a thousand of our close personal friends): My baccalaureate is in Aerospace Engineering. Guess from where? Hint: walking distance.

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

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  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Friday, May 13, 2011 4:12 AM

That would be linked to the Marauder?

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  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Sunday, May 22, 2011 10:31 PM

huh?

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

Recite the litanies, fire up the Gellar field, a poo storm is coming Hmm 

My signature

Check out my blog here.

  • Member since
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  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Tuesday, June 7, 2011 4:02 PM

Well it looks like the last question just died of natural causes.

So I guess I will post the next one.

We all are aware of that flying dinosaur, the Zeppelin.

Early on in WWI the first one was downed, but not by conventional weaponry.

So this is indeed a two-part question:

The first part has three items:

  1. Which Zeppelin was downed?
  2. Name the allied pilot, and how did the flyer actually down the monster?
  3. How many survivors lived and what was unusual as to how? Explain as to why he was able to at that time, but they could not rely on such a tactic when the raider came to bomb England.

Now for the trickiest and truly trivial question:

Usually the story is told and the credit is granted to a certain make and model of aircraft.

The common story is in error, inasmuch as indeed an aircraft of the same manufacturer was used, but not that actual variant. Which one was the actual variant used?

Now feel free to take a stab at the items you feel comfortible with, and for those who sincerely wish to work with this question, if it looks like a "sticking point" I can choose to waive any part of my question and/or offer hints.

Tom T Cowboy

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
    April 2011
  • From: Auckland, New Zealand
Posted by Jafa on Tuesday, June 7, 2011 8:48 PM

 

I'll give it a shot,

Which Zeppelin was downed? LZ37

Name the allied pilot, and how did the flyer actually down the monster? Reginald Alexander John Warnefield

It appears he bombed it from above

How many survivors lived and what was unusual as to how? I can only find record of his surviving, albeit after the explosion blew him upside down and stopped his engine, he force landed, repaired the engine and flew away

Explain as to why he was able to at that time, but they could not rely on such a tactic when the raider came to bomb England? I guess bombing a airborne target over your own country is a lil risky.

 

Finally I have only found mention of the Morane Saulnier Type L Aircraft so can't answer the final part of the question.

 

Sources:

Wikipedia, The First Zeppelin Kill from WW1Aviation.com and century of flight.com

Kia Kaha

Stewart

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by F-8fanatic on Tuesday, June 7, 2011 9:28 PM

The common story was actually not of this incident, but supposedly took place at a later date.  As the story went, French ace pilot Roland Garros was attacking a zeppelin when he ran out of ammo, so he supposedly rammed the intruder with his Morane Bullet, flying right through and out the other side.  There was no legitimate report of this, but faked pictures of a zeppelin with the airplane-shaped hole in it were sold throughout Paris for weeks afterwards....

  • Member since
    April 2011
  • From: Auckland, New Zealand
Posted by Jafa on Tuesday, June 7, 2011 10:04 PM

thanks for that, its a fun image and good for morale I guess

  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Thursday, June 9, 2011 3:38 PM

 

I like your answer, it is close.

Interestingly enough this pilot's method of downing the airship was the same as the earlier downing, i.e., mid-air bombing, which occured in 8 October 1914.

Hint:

This pilot was flying a Sopwith aircraft of that era.

However, if no one can do better then you in a day or so, I feel you ought to have the next go at it for giving us a very good answer.

Tom T Cowboy

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
    April 2011
  • From: Auckland, New Zealand
Posted by Jafa on Thursday, June 9, 2011 4:41 PM

I have now found reference to one survivor from LZ37, one of the crew apparently fell from the airship (which crashed on a convent) hitting the roof and falling through that to land in an unoccupied bed in room below. Additionally this report suggests the airship was carrying V.I.P. Engineers and Designers?

http://acepilots.com/wwi/zeppelin.html

I have not been able to find any reports of allied aircraft destroying a Zeppelin prior to Warneford and there doesn't appear to be any reports of Zeppelins used over England until 1915, prior to that they seem to have been mostly used by the navy as observation platforms, so I will be very interested in your answer when it comes.

Warneford's aircraft was nicknamed a Mauraine Parasol (out of interest

  • Member since
    April 2011
  • From: Auckland, New Zealand
Posted by Jafa on Thursday, June 9, 2011 4:55 PM

hmm LZ25 was destroyed on the 8th October 1914 by bombing, but it was in it's hangar at the time.

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by F-8fanatic on Saturday, June 11, 2011 2:46 PM

The 8 October incident you are thinking of was not an aerial victory--on that date in 1914, a pair of RNAS Sopwith Tabloid aircraft set out to attack the zeppelin sheds at Cologne and Dusseldorf.  This was the first British air raid over German territory of the war.  The target at Cologne was not located, and so that pilot bombed the train station instead.  The other pilot dropped two 20 pound bombs on the sheds at Dusseldorf, and in the process destroyed zeppelin Z.IX on the ground.  The airship was in the shed when the attack took place.

  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Monday, June 13, 2011 4:20 PM

Well, Jafa's answer is the answer I was thinking of, wherein the airship was a VIP tour and the captain panicked when  the British Sopwith parasol pilot started pestering him with his Webley handgun, and so he suddenly dedided to lose altitude allowing the Sopwith driver to literally bomb the airship out of the air..

Unfortuantely, I have only erad this account in two erferences one of which I owned, but was lost in a move, thusly I also no longer have the particulars.

If it is OK with you-all, as far as I am concerned, Jafa has it.

Tom TCowboy

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

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