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Aircraft Trivia Quiz

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  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Friday, July 22, 2011 10:18 AM

Close,

Here is a hint:

It was a Boeing aircraft, however now think-what was the most prominant heavy bomber of WWII?

By prominant, I mean this aircraft was used and successfully modified throught WWII, and became the stereotypical heavy bomber legend.

Now knowing the varient's number, the aircraft I am thinking about was it's predecessor, therefore it's designation would be numbers before it.

Now this aircraft was so huge, it literally had sleeping quarters in it's wing roots for the crew.

Tom T Cowboy

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
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  • From: Yuma, Arizona
Posted by Brumbles on Friday, July 22, 2011 10:22 AM

XB-15?  If right, someone else can ask the next. 

  • Member since
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  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Friday, July 22, 2011 11:45 AM

Hey Brumbles, since I am essentially making this one a no-brainer with the generous clues I am passing out, I will have to say "Close but no cigar".

However you are closer then Osher, but here is the rub:

As I posited in the initial question: "it was produced without the "X" designation", so the answer I am looking for will not have an "X" in it.

Also although you almost got it, you only answered one out of the two required questions.

Now if you want to try again, you might get one out of two, but you gotta also answer the second one as well.

Tom T Cowboy

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: San Francisco, CA
Posted by telsono on Friday, July 22, 2011 11:52 AM

How about the Boeing YB-9?

Mike T.

Beware the hobby that eats.  - Ben Franklin

Do not fear mistakes. You will know failure. Continue to reach out. - Ben Franklin

The U.S. Constitution  doesn't guarantee happiness, only the pursuit of it. You have to catch up with it yourself. - Ben Franklin

  • Member since
    August 2009
  • From: Toledo Area OH
Posted by Sparrowhyperion on Friday, July 22, 2011 11:53 AM

Are you talking about the Boeing Model 229, which was the prototype for the B17 and I think was originally designed as a possible long range transport (cargo/airliner)?

 

T_Terrific

Hey Brumbles, since I am essentially making this one a no-brainer with the generous clues I am passing out, I will have to say "Close but no cigar".

However you are closer then Osher, but here is the rub:

As I posited in the initial question: "it was produced without the "X" designation", so the answer I am looking for will not have an "X" in it.

Also although you almost got it, you only answered one out of the two required questions.

Now if you want to try again, you might get one out of two, but you gotta also answer the second one as well.

Tom T Cowboy

In the Hangar: 1/48 Hobby Boss F/A-18D RAAF Hornet,

On the Tarmac:  F4U-1D RNZAF Corsair 1/48 Scale.

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: San Francisco, CA
Posted by telsono on Friday, July 22, 2011 12:01 PM

Or should I use the designation  Y1B-9A which had the Boeing designation model  B-246. the tail resembles the early B-17's.

File:Boeing Y1B-9 test flight USAF p29.jpg

Mike T.

Beware the hobby that eats.  - Ben Franklin

Do not fear mistakes. You will know failure. Continue to reach out. - Ben Franklin

The U.S. Constitution  doesn't guarantee happiness, only the pursuit of it. You have to catch up with it yourself. - Ben Franklin

  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Friday, July 22, 2011 12:11 PM

Sorry  Telly,

Brumblwes actually was veeeeeeeeeeeeery close, but as I said

1. "it was produced without the "X" ( or "Y") designation",

2. You gotta also answer at least two out of the three parts to the question.

Now, if you wanna try again you are welcome to, but since I have practically given away the aircraft's designation number, I would like to see you also stab at the other parts to the question.

Now to be fair, if for instance, you go to Wikipedia, they only acknowledge the "X" designation to this bird, but as I understand, in fact this aircraft did make it past the "X" stage and actually a few were actually produced.

Why this is information not currently available on the internet, I do not know.Tongue Tied

My reference source is a very old publication regarding the history of the Boeing P-26, where as a side the author went into the legacy of this monstor as well.

Now to be fair, if someone gets the other two parts right, I would see a simple error like sticking an "X" in their answer as moot, since they got at least two out of three.

OK?

Tom T Cowboy

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Austin, TX
Posted by SuperNova-SS on Friday, July 22, 2011 12:15 PM

Hmmm....

I play World of Tanks! (Yeah, I'm a dork)If anybody has one of those kits with the WoT coupons inside, I'll be happy to take them off of your hands!   :-)

http://i1213.photobucket.com/albums/cc465/the_real_red_baron/60E0B8F7.jpg

  • Member since
    April 2011
  • From: Auckland, New Zealand
Posted by Jafa on Friday, July 22, 2011 6:42 PM

I am going to suggest the XB15, yes I know it has an X designation but one was produced and used in active service, redesignated XC105 and used as a transport aircraft. Boeing number 294

The key factor is it was significantly underpowered for its possible payload, (maximum take off weight 5,000lbs greater than a B17 with 1,800 less horsepower)

My guess for the negative effect of pre spinning the wheels would be the extra instability caused by the gryoscopic effect of even slighty unbalanced wheels, while i have not found reference to this for this aircraft, I have read the effect of the "Dambuster" mines spinning up made handling the lancasters very difficult.

Kia Kaha

Jafa

  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Thursday, July 28, 2011 11:36 AM

Jafa:

You did it!!!!!!!!!!!!Yes

You hit the jackpot withe the bonus question correctly answered to boot!

Your go guy!

Tom T Cowboy

 

 

 

 

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
    April 2011
  • From: Auckland, New Zealand
Posted by Jafa on Thursday, July 28, 2011 2:41 PM

Thanks Tom,

Although others also named the aircraft so the victory is a shared one...

I will post a question shortly

Kia Kaha

Jafa

  • Member since
    April 2011
  • From: Auckland, New Zealand
Posted by Jafa on Friday, July 29, 2011 5:41 PM

The highest "kill" score by any pilot in an american made aircraft was scored in which aircraft?

For a bonus who achieved this feat and what was his score?

Kia Kaha

Jafa

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Friday, July 29, 2011 6:05 PM

P-38, Richard Bong, 40?

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  • From: Auckland, New Zealand
Posted by Jafa on Friday, July 29, 2011 6:39 PM

no, no and no I am afraid

 

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  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Friday, July 29, 2011 6:49 PM

Ilmari Juutilainen In a brewter Buffalo. 94 kills total, 34 in a buffalo.

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

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  • Member since
    April 2011
  • From: Auckland, New Zealand
Posted by Jafa on Friday, July 29, 2011 6:53 PM

sorry no I worded the question a little badly, all the kills were made in the same aircraft type/model.

So I am looking for the aircraft model first and foremost followed by the pilot and number of kills.

  • Member since
    April 2009
Posted by gmat on Saturday, July 30, 2011 4:33 AM

Grigoriy Rechkalov

From Wiki.

Says the majority of his kills were achieved on P 39N-0 number 42-8747 and P 39Q-15 number 44-2547.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grigoriy_Rechkalov

 

Listed as 61 in a P-39Q here,  but tally varies according to sources.

http://www.fighteracesonline.com/grigori_rechkalov.htm

Rechkalov was an outstanding fighter pilot, a natural shot who had personal conflicts with his division commanders. It was said that Rechkalov was more interested in building his personal tally than being a fighterleader. Nethertheless there is no misunderstanding of his ability's in the air, flying his P-39Q Air cobra Rechkalov scored 61 victories in just 122 combat missions. Rechkalov was awarded the HSU twice, he became a Major-General of Aviation in 1951.

But listed at 50 here.

http://acepilots.com/planes/soviet_p39_airacobra.html

And listed as 44 here, but it has the most detailed accounting of his claims.

http://surfcity.kund.dalnet.se/soviet_rechkalov.htm

 

If the last one is correct, then he falls behind Aleksandr I. Porkryshkin who is listed with 48 claims.

Here, link also provided above.

http://acepilots.com/planes/soviet_p39_airacobra.html

Not clear, but perhaps 55 in mostly in 1943, all in P-39s,  according to Wiki.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Pokryshkin

 

He flew these P-39s, P-39K-1 BuNo 42-4421 "White 13", P-39N BuNo 42-9004, "White 100",  "white 17", 41-38520, and P-39Q-15 "white 50".

 

An article of his service here, doesn't detail his claims completely, though.

http://mig3.sovietwarplanes.com/mig3/pokryshkin.html

Best wishes,

Grant

  • Member since
    April 2011
  • From: Auckland, New Zealand
Posted by Jafa on Saturday, July 30, 2011 5:15 PM

And the winner is... The P39 Aircobra in the hands of a Soviet pilot.

 

Well done Grant over to you...

Kia Kaha

Jafa

 

  • Member since
    April 2009
Posted by gmat on Tuesday, August 2, 2011 3:26 PM

Sorry for the delay in answering. Here goes.

This popular family of US WWII fighters never served in this rather large area nor with its regional Air Force during its long service history although all of its Air Force contemporaries (fighters) did so at some time in their service lives. What family of aircraft and where did they never appear or serve in at least squadron service?

 

Best wishes,

Grant

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Tuesday, August 2, 2011 3:52 PM

The F4U Corsair never served in US hands in Europe?

  • Member since
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  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Tuesday, August 2, 2011 4:03 PM

That sounds more like the P-40 in western Europe, although it was used in north Africa (where the RAF painted the shark teeth on it that the Flying Tigers later copied), and in eastern Europe by the Russians.  However, the P-38 was used.  As far as I know the P-39 was only used in a restricted capacity (although, I think the same is true of the P-40, so I could be the wrong-way-around!).

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by F-8fanatic on Tuesday, August 2, 2011 4:44 PM

I'm going to say the P-47 thunderbolt in the Aleutians.  I know that the 38, 39 and 40 were there, and the 51 was there later.  But I havent found anything on the Jug being there

 

  • Member since
    April 2009
Posted by gmat on Tuesday, August 2, 2011 7:26 PM

F8fanatic is right. Not only the P-47 but the P-35 and P-43 also never served in Alaska. The P-47 served pretty much everywhere else but some cases that would be stretching the point. P-47s missed North Africa but served with the 12th and 15th AF in the Mediterranean. The 13th AF never had P-47s during the war, so they missed the Solomons including Guadalcanal, but the 18th FG, part of the post war 13th AF had some at Clark. The 43rd FS, part of the 6th AF in Panama had some in 1946. When the 36th FG moved there, the 53rd FS replaced the 43rd. The P-26 and P-63 round out the list of WWII USAAF fighters never serving in Alaska.

 

Over to you. Glad the right answer came up so quickly.

Best wishes,

Grant

  • Member since
    April 2009
Posted by gmat on Tuesday, August 2, 2011 7:28 PM

The P-36 also served in Alaska.

Grant

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by F-8fanatic on Wednesday, August 3, 2011 7:18 AM

OK, this is a fighter aircraft.....not a very good one, either.  If you were flying one of these, you could be killed just by routinely landing the plane, even when you did everything right.  In just over three years of service, this plane killed more than two dozen of its own pilots, but not a single one of the enemy.  This plane had such bad luck that the original engine it carried would cut out in a slight rain!  Worse, firing your guns often resulted in the same problem--the engine would sputter and stall.....Imagine being ordered to go to war in such a plane? 

Name the plane....

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Wednesday, August 3, 2011 8:48 AM

The gutless Cutlass?

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by F-8fanatic on Wednesday, August 3, 2011 10:22 PM

wow, that didnt take long!  Over to you, milair....

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Thursday, August 4, 2011 4:23 AM

F-8fanatic

wow, that didnt take long!  Over to you, milair....

No, problem - I often think Navy bird when you post.............

Anyway, any ally of this country once said "Only the (insert nationality) could put (insert power) of thrust into an aircraft & keep it subsonic", the last serving example had a very unusual feature for an aircraft &  It was also the last aircraft to be produced by this prestigious manufacturer.

Name the plane?

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Thursday, August 4, 2011 4:36 AM

The VC-10?  I believe it was the last aircraft produced by Vickers, and it had huge power reserves, whilst remaining (just) subsonic.

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Thursday, August 4, 2011 5:39 AM

osher

VC-10? 

Sorry, not the VC-10, "the last serving example" rules it out.

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