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Aircraft Trivia Quiz

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  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Land of Oz
Posted by MilitaryAircraft101 on Thursday, August 11, 2011 4:57 AM

WAIIIIIIIIIIIIIT!!!!! The Boomerang was based on the Wirraway which in turn was based on the Texan RIGHT... It shared the same engine as the famous naval fighter Wildcat... It was an emergency fighter that had a retractable undercarriage as well. Aah, it evaded me at first...

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Thursday, August 11, 2011 4:58 AM

Yep, you got it, the Boomerang!  Over to you.

  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Land of Oz
Posted by MilitaryAircraft101 on Thursday, August 11, 2011 5:08 AM

My first flight was on the 7th September 1942 and I was designed as a fallback for one of the most well known bombers of all time. I share my engines with A-1 Skyraiders. What am I?

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Thursday, August 11, 2011 5:12 AM

B-32 Dominator

  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Land of Oz
Posted by MilitaryAircraft101 on Thursday, August 11, 2011 3:43 PM

Speedy! You got it

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Thursday, August 11, 2011 3:49 PM

This six-engined aircraft was designed around a specific 22,400 Ib bomb.  One of the reasons it never went into production was that it was so singular in purpose.  However, the bomb did go into production, and a rival company's aircraft was developed to the point it could carry it.  What was the name of the unbuilt aircraft, and for a bonus, the bomb it would have carried?

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Thursday, August 11, 2011 4:21 PM

The Victory Bomber & the Earthquake Bomb, the bomb would later become the Tallboy & Grand Slam, both of which were carried by the Lanc.?

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Friday, August 12, 2011 3:09 AM

Spot on!  The Grand Slam was the 22,400 Ib bomb which later versions of the Lancaster could carry, obviating the need for a special bomber, in this case, the Victory bomber.  Over to you old bean!

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Friday, August 12, 2011 4:00 AM

osher

 Over to you old bean!

I didn't think I was that over the hill!

This aircraft was responsible for the first jet engined landing at sea (at sea, not into the sea)?

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Friday, August 12, 2011 4:19 AM

I knew this one, took me few mins to work it out!  It was a Ryan Fireball by accident, when it's piston engine failed.  According to Wiki, it was the 6th November 1945.

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Friday, August 12, 2011 5:03 AM

Yes, indeed the Ryan Fireball.

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Friday, August 12, 2011 5:07 AM

Which aircraft used an elephant's foot to help loading?

  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Land of Oz
Posted by MilitaryAircraft101 on Friday, August 12, 2011 5:27 AM

Blackburn beverl

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Friday, August 12, 2011 5:31 AM

Well, it's the Blackburn Beverly but you're there! Cool Over to you...

  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Land of Oz
Posted by MilitaryAircraft101 on Friday, August 12, 2011 5:43 AM

Date of the first victory for piston fighters over jets. Bonus: Pilots names

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Friday, August 12, 2011 8:37 AM

05/10/44, Davenport, Smith, Everard, Sinclair & MacKay, 401 RCAF in Spitfire IX's

Or

28/08/44, Myers & Croy, USAAF 78th FG, P-47's

 

The USAAF victory was over a 262 which had intentionally belly landed in a field to evade the P-47's, but the P-47's didn't shoot until the 262 was on the deck or almost there..................................

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Rothesay, NB Canada
Posted by VanceCrozier on Friday, August 12, 2011 8:45 AM

Milairjunkie

05/10/44, Davenport, Smith, Everard, Sinclair & MacKay, 401 RCAF in Spitfire IX's

.....

Yes Yes Wink

On the bench: Airfix 1/72 Wildcat; Airfix 1/72 Vampire T11; Airfix 1/72 Fouga Magister

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Friday, August 12, 2011 9:17 AM

VanceCrozier

 Milairjunkie:

05/10/44, Davenport, Smith, Everard, Sinclair & MacKay, 401 RCAF in Spitfire IX's

.....

 

Yes Yes Wink

So Maple boy is an ATQ lurker?

When I was typing it in I figured that you would have something to say if you saw it................................

  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Land of Oz
Posted by MilitaryAircraft101 on Thursday, August 18, 2011 5:38 AM

Well milairjunkie's right with his RCAF Spitfire IXs... I spose it's over to him! Vance = LOL Wink

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Thursday, August 18, 2011 6:16 AM

The first production jet aircraft to refuel in the air?

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by F-8fanatic on Thursday, August 18, 2011 9:59 AM

I have found a reference to a Gloster Meteor III hooking up to a Lancaster that was fitted with refueling gear in April 1949, but no fuel was passed.  In August 1949, a Meteor III was kept in the air for more than 12 hours by use of aerial refueling.  But this was an aircraft that was obviously modified for the purpose.  The first production jet I can find that was built with the capability to refuel was the B-45C Tornado....this first flew in May 1949.  I'm going to go with the B-45C as my answer, as it was the first I could find that was originally built with the capability.

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Thursday, August 18, 2011 10:19 AM

F-8fanatic

 I'm going to go with the B-45C as my answer, as it was the first I could find that was originally built with the capability.

Close enough for me, the RB-45C was the bird, refuelled in 1950 by a flying boom Superfortress.

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by F-8fanatic on Saturday, August 20, 2011 12:25 PM

Ok, here goes...

 

This aircraft served during wartime, and was actually deployed to the combat theatre.  Out of all that were built, only 2 examples did not go to war.  This plane had a crew of 2 and saw combat duty for less than 2 years....and they never received as much as a single bullet hit.  After their combat duty they were returned to their home country, where their very unique capabilities were put to use by a civilian law enforcement agency.  Currently, there is only one still flying in the world, with a second one actually owned by a museum but not restored yet. 

 

What is the plane, and for bonus points, there were two very unique properties that this aircraft had.  Name both of them.

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by F-8fanatic on Saturday, August 20, 2011 12:48 PM

Ok, here goes...

 

This aircraft served during wartime, and was actually deployed to the combat theatre.  Out of all that were built, only 2 examples did not go to war.  This plane had a crew of 2 and saw combat duty for less than 2 years....and they never received as much as a single bullet hit.  After their combat duty they were returned to their home country, where their very unique capabilities were put to use by a civilian law enforcement agency.  Currently, there is only one still flying in the world, with a second one actually owned by a museum but not restored yet. 

 

What is the plane, and for bonus points, there were two very unique properties that this aircraft had.  Name both of them.

  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Land of Oz
Posted by MilitaryAircraft101 on Saturday, August 20, 2011 5:44 PM

Wow, a toughie, any clues Whistling

  • Member since
    April 2009
Posted by gmat on Sunday, August 21, 2011 1:44 AM

It was used in the Viet Nam War. Only a few were made.

Grant

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Sunday, August 21, 2011 2:20 AM

I think it is the Lockheed YO-3 Quiet Star:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_YO-3

 

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by F-8fanatic on Sunday, August 21, 2011 12:01 PM

yep, its the YO-3A.  Interesting little bird, this one was so quiet that at 1000 feet AGL it was silent.  Also, it used radar-absorbing paint.....when the pilot turned off the transponder, the control tower couldnt see it on radar.  NASA still flies one today and there is one being restored out west.

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Friday, August 26, 2011 9:16 AM

Here is the next question;

Which aircraft was the first (and maybe only) aircraft to be specifically desinged and build as an engine test bed? It was used to test both redial and inline engines.

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Friday, August 26, 2011 11:05 AM

This question was driving me nuts, because  I'd read about this aircraft before, and I remembered it was from a small British manufacturer.  I thought Glosters, but, I was only half right, it was in the Folland F.108 (with some help from Google).

However, there was the flying bedstead from Rolls Royce, which was also a pure testbed.

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