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Aircraft Trivia Quiz

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  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Saturday, August 27, 2011 3:05 AM

 

The Folland Fo.108 is the right answer! I think it is the ugliest aircraft ever build!

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  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Saturday, August 27, 2011 4:39 AM

Cool!  It had been bugging me that one!

OK, what aircraft shared the same name (not designation) as the name of it's engine (not engine manufacturer)?  There may be more than one, so, I'll accept the first one.  

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Posted by F-8fanatic on Saturday, August 27, 2011 4:02 PM

The Miles M.9 Kestrel was powered by the Rolls Royce Kestrel engine.  The plane went into production and the name was changed to Miles Master.

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  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Saturday, August 27, 2011 4:26 PM

Indubitably! Over to you sir!

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  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Friday, September 9, 2011 10:10 AM

Well, since it has been over a week or so and we have no takers, I guess I get to posit another of my favorite points of trivia.

As we know, in the early development of aircraft the seaplane was a serious candidate due to the lack of adequate airfields, landing strips, etc. Also they had the aspect of surviving over water if the plane had engine failure.

A feature that is taken for granted on all seaplanes since WWI was innovated by a famous aircraft designer whose designs continues to soldier on throughout  WWII.

Who was this famous designer and what was the innovation?

Tom T Cowboy

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

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  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Friday, September 9, 2011 10:24 AM

Was it John Porte & the "Felixstowe Notch", which would later become the stepped hull?

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  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Friday, September 9, 2011 10:31 AM

No, but he was European, though, and designed one of the world’s largest seaplanes between the wars as well as being his country's premier seaplane designer during WWII.

 

Tom T Cowboy

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
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Posted by gmat on Saturday, September 10, 2011 11:30 AM

No movement. I'm sure he's not British, Russian, French or Italian.

Grant

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  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Sunday, September 11, 2011 12:52 AM

gmat

No movement. I'm sure he's not British, Russian, French or Italian.

Grant

Claude (Claudius) Honoré Desiré Dornier?

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

  • Member since
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  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Monday, September 12, 2011 11:35 AM

You got it Tom Z.

Care to share with us his innovation for saeplanes?

Hint:

Up to this point, the main disadvantage a seaplane had was its hull breaking free of the water's surface tension. This led to exetnsive and diffecult take-offs.

His simple fix essentially to the bottom hull design enabled the seaplane to break-free of the water sooner.

Tom T Cowboy

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Monday, September 12, 2011 2:49 PM

T_Terrific
wrote the following post on Monday, September 12, 2011
You got it Tom Z.
Care to share with us his innovation for seaplanes?
Hint:
Up to this point, the main disadvantage a seaplane had was its hull breaking free of the water's surface tension. This led to extensive and difficult take-offs.
His simple fix essentially to the bottom hull design enabled the seaplane to break-free of the water sooner.
Tom T Cowboy

I always did, back in April!

TomZ2
wrote the following post on Saturday, April 16, 2011

I think you're referring to the hull step and I was taught that we should credit Archimedes. Or did you mean Glenn Curtiss?

In otherwise, you're repeating yourself. Do you want me to reply my chestnut on the Sausage again? (Someone remember? Anyone?) Anybody want to pose a Aircraft Trivia question?

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

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  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Monday, September 12, 2011 4:28 PM

Ill post one.

This aircraft never existed, yet it was release as a model.

(Hint, its a missing number)

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

Recite the litanies, fire up the Gellar field, a poo storm is coming Hmm 

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  • From: Toledo Area OH
Posted by Sparrowhyperion on Monday, September 12, 2011 4:34 PM

F107 Ultra Sabre?

In the Hangar: 1/48 Hobby Boss F/A-18D RAAF Hornet,

On the Tarmac:  F4U-1D RNZAF Corsair 1/48 Scale.

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  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Monday, September 12, 2011 4:50 PM

F-19

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Posted by Scorpiomikey on Monday, September 12, 2011 5:24 PM

Osher got it. The F-107 ultra sabre had a prototype built, but as far as i understand there was never any aircraft designated F-19.

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

Recite the litanies, fire up the Gellar field, a poo storm is coming Hmm 

My signature

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  • Member since
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  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Monday, September 12, 2011 5:35 PM

Sometimes described as the most beautiful aircraft ever built, this wooden passenger airliner was developed from a mail-plane, before that a racer, and was developed into another aircraft, which ironically also included an (uncomfortable and cramped) passenger variant..  Only 7 (2 prototypes and 5 production) aircraft were built.  4 crashed on landing, 1 was destroyed on the ground, the remaining 2 were scrapped.

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  • From: Toledo Area OH
Posted by Sparrowhyperion on Monday, September 12, 2011 9:39 PM

I didn't even realize they made an F107 Prototype.  The F19 kit was just a best guess at what the F17 was supposed to look like.  There is also the MIG 37 Ferret kit which is the Russian equivalent.  I don't think either were ever really built.

In the Hangar: 1/48 Hobby Boss F/A-18D RAAF Hornet,

On the Tarmac:  F4U-1D RNZAF Corsair 1/48 Scale.

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  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Monday, September 12, 2011 10:44 PM

I think you mean F-117 as the F-17 was a miniature F-18.

This is the F-107.

I would have actually accepted Mig 37, at the time i didnt even think of it.

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

Recite the litanies, fire up the Gellar field, a poo storm is coming Hmm 

My signature

Check out my blog here.

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  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 1:43 AM

Mikey, at a stretch, you could also put the F-108 in that category. Never built, only existed in mock-up form and there have been models released of this subject.

 

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 1:57 AM

This is true. However, Osher posted a question above lol.

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

Recite the litanies, fire up the Gellar field, a poo storm is coming Hmm 

My signature

Check out my blog here.

  • Member since
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  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 9:08 AM

Just for a couple more clues, this was a 4 engined aircraft, and the airframe manufacturer also built their own engines - which is one reason they used 4 engines, as they only built small engines!

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  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 9:52 AM

De Havilland D.H.91 Albatross?

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  • From: Edgware, London
Posted by osher on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 5:46 PM

Indeed so!  The Albatross.  Of course, as we know now, it had it's problems, but, if allowed into full production I'm sure those would have been ironed out (as per the Mosquito that was developed from it).

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  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 3:20 AM

One of this aircrafts selling points was the use of carbon fiber in a certain area, this would eventually result in the bankruptcy of of one of the companies involved?

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Posted by gmat on Thursday, September 15, 2011 7:35 PM

No movement, the sum of the four digit number of the aircraft model number was three.

 

Best wishes,

Grant

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  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Thursday, September 15, 2011 8:44 PM

F-102 Delta Dagger. But your meant to wait a week, not 2 days lol.

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

Recite the litanies, fire up the Gellar field, a poo storm is coming Hmm 

My signature

Check out my blog here.

  • Member since
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Posted by gmat on Thursday, September 15, 2011 9:06 PM

Sorry. It was more info to the previous question.

Grant

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by F-8fanatic on Friday, September 16, 2011 12:25 AM

Milairjunkie

One of this aircrafts selling points was the use of carbon fiber in a certain area, this would eventually result in the bankruptcy of of one of the companies involved?

The aircraft was the Lockheed L-1011 Tristar.  The certain area was the jet engines--more specifically, one of the fan stages was made from a carbon fiber material called "hyfil".  The engine was the Rolls Royce RB211, and the costs involved with the carbon fiber design were a factor in Rolls Royce Limited's impending bankruptcy....

Side note, I flew on a Tristar once.  And only once.  And thanks to that flight,  I know what a sardine feels like.

  • Member since
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  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Friday, September 16, 2011 3:31 AM

Correct with the TriStar F-8.

The TriStar, although ultimately unsuccessfully due to it's sales figures, carried some advanced avionics for its day. The RB211, which was also quite advanced at the time would eventually be developed into a successfully engine...

F-8 - spare a thought for the British personnel who often have to fly by TriStar - when they aren't tanking!

  • Member since
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  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Friday, September 16, 2011 12:39 PM

F-8fanatic

(...)

Side note, I flew on a Tristar once.  And only once.  And thanks to that flight,  I know what a sardine feels like.

Mhhh, I flew with a Delta Tristar from amsterdam to atlanta and do not remember feeling like a sardine.... but I was 11, so leg room was not an issue.

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