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Aircraft Trivia Quiz

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  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 3:11 PM

Thats what Google turned up. Unless he is asking as a crewmember or passenger.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 3:22 PM

Second part of the question Stik, was to name the aircraft. Which you know since you searched Google. Thats almost the best part.

About the only "modern" thing about a 180 is that it's all metal. Ribs and stringers, and a tail dragger to boot.

  • Member since
    October, 2016
  • From: Somewhere in Ohio...
Posted by DasBeav on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 4:41 PM

Sorry, been away for awhile. Your answers have all been incorrect. This Lady or Dame did not pilot the aircraft around the world. She just "wrote" around in it on a "Stairway to Heaven"Wink

Sooner Born...Buckeye Bred.

 

  • Member since
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Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 5:14 PM

Now THAT is an easy google search...

  • Member since
    October, 2016
  • From: Somewhere in Ohio...
Posted by DasBeav on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 5:21 PM

Too many subtle clues....?

Sooner Born...Buckeye Bred.

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 5:27 PM

Sure, I'll say that when I get the answer...

  • Member since
    October, 2016
  • From: Somewhere in Ohio...
Posted by DasBeav on Wednesday, December 07, 2016 8:11 PM

Sorry, I'll be busy for the next month, so here's the answer. Lady Grace Marguerite Hay Drummond-Hay. She flew on the Graf Zeppelin when it flew around the world in 1928. Somebody else feel free to ask  question.  thank you.Balloons

Sooner Born...Buckeye Bred.

 

  • Member since
    October, 2016
  • From: Lincoln, NE
Posted by Daniel Ficke on Friday, December 09, 2016 10:24 PM

Ok then, which aircraft did this:After the attack, it might dive to a lower altitude and flatten out into level flight. The pilot would then proceed with a well-practised escape sequence. He would open the cockpit canopy latch; the canopy flicking backwards on its hinge in the airstream; he would undo his seat belt and remove his feet from the rudder pedal stirrups. By squeezing a lever mounted on the control column, he would release a lock at the base of the column, which would allow him to tilt the column forwards where it could engage in and undo a safety latch for the nose release mechanism. He would then lean a little further forward and pull a lever hinged near the floor at the front of the cockpit. This action frees the nose section, which self-jettisoned as a result of the reduced aerodynamic pressure at the front of the fuselage. As the nose section separates, it was intended to briefly pull on two cables that release a small ribbon parachute stored on the starboard side of the rear fuselage. The parachute subsequently opens and decelerates the plane. The pilot would be ejected from the cockpit by his own inertia and as soon as he was clear of the fuselage, he would open his personal parachute and descend to the ground.

Daniel J. Ficke

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, December 09, 2016 11:53 PM

Sounds like the Natter

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, December 10, 2016 12:32 AM

Its not Daniels turn.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, December 10, 2016 12:48 AM

Beav opened it up since nobody answered his question.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, December 10, 2016 1:28 AM

I'll roger that.

  • Member since
    October, 2016
  • From: Lincoln, NE
Posted by Daniel Ficke on Saturday, December 10, 2016 11:52 AM

Stikpusher got it.

Daniel J. Ficke

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, August 10, 2017 11:36 PM

80 air crew flew in Special Aviation Project #1, the "Doolittle Raid".

But only one was a West Point grad.

Who was he?

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Saturday, August 12, 2017 3:31 PM

GMorrison

80 air crew flew in Special Aviation Project #1, the "Doolittle Raid".

But only one was a West Point grad.

Who was he?

 

 
Edward "Ski" York
 

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: 1/48th Academy Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion; 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II; 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet; 1/48th Eduard Fokker Dr. 1 Triplane; 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings; 1/48th Monogram Douglas TBD-1 Devastator; 1/48th Monogram Pro-Modeler A-26B Invader

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
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Posted by GMorrison on Monday, August 14, 2017 11:37 AM

You are right!

"Ski" was the pilot of aircraft #8, B-25B, 40-2242, '3', Pilot Capt. Edward York.

The impetus of the question is that in addition to the immediate assumption it would be Doolittle, it's remarkable this thing was run on the efforts of enlisted men. Doolittle went through ROTC.

Compare to the Battle of the Coral Sea, where many of the pilots were Academy grads.

If you wish, your turn.

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, August 14, 2017 1:58 PM

Identify this aircraft (maker and designation):

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: 1/48th Academy Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion; 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II; 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet; 1/48th Eduard Fokker Dr. 1 Triplane; 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings; 1/48th Monogram Douglas TBD-1 Devastator; 1/48th Monogram Pro-Modeler A-26B Invader

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    May, 2016
Posted by jacobrivers on Monday, August 14, 2017 6:22 PM

Devil Dawg

Identify this aircraft (maker and designation):

 

Vought VE-7F. 


Almost anything written above this line is subject to every sort of inaccuracy.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, August 14, 2017 9:10 PM

jacobrivers

 

 
Devil Dawg

Identify this aircraft (maker and designation):

 

 

 

Vought VE-7F.  

Dang!! I thought there'd be a couple of guesses before anybody got it. You're it!!

 

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: 1/48th Academy Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion; 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II; 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet; 1/48th Eduard Fokker Dr. 1 Triplane; 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings; 1/48th Monogram Douglas TBD-1 Devastator; 1/48th Monogram Pro-Modeler A-26B Invader

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    May, 2016
Posted by jacobrivers on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 6:42 PM

Running late! Sorry about that. I'm not that great with my aircraft trivia, but here goes:

Jumo 004b

In 1943, the Jumo 004b jet engine was having problems, the turbine blades were developing cracks in them (partly due to a wartime material shortage.) Due to a sound coming from deep in the engine, they realized that the issue was a difference in the RPM's of the turbine and compressor blades. They resolved this issue using a very skilled professional. What did they do?


Almost anything written above this line is subject to every sort of inaccuracy.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 7:05 PM

A SWAG says they used a musician of some sort to identify the problem then somehow identify when they corrected the two to the same RPMs.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 8:04 PM

I have a slightly different take on the frequency problem. I think the various sections were coaxial, so they rotated at the same speed. But, there was a vibration frequency of the blades that matched the engine running rpm and created a nasty harmonic. This was solved by shotening the blade length, increasing it's natural frequency. And they lowered the engine speed, both to get the vibration ranges uncoupled.

I find axial compressor engines to be a pretty cool invention.

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