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Aircraft Trivia Quiz

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  • Member since
    December 2005
Posted by hudskit on Tuesday, January 3, 2006 8:03 PM

well done RemcoGrob- the dinah's performance was well ahead of the curve when it was built in 1940 but it was never really developed/improved during the wartime.

Great answer, Keith

 

As for England losing it's world power status after WW I, I'd have to disagree (politely, of course). Britain had, of course, lost none of it's colonies/territories and with the dissolution of Germany's short lived empire, had increased it's possesions substantially after the war- there was no vacuum to be "filled"-much less by a (then) second rate power such as the U.S.

 

Things are much clearer in hindsight,

Keith

This whole workin' for a living thing does get in the way of so many things....
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Posted by hudskit on Tuesday, January 3, 2006 8:12 PM

Another question for the propellor crowd- please name the 2 high altitude experimental aircraft developed from the Lockheed 10 Electra (pre-war twin engine transport)- bonus points if you can tell of the "alledged" link between the 2 aircraft- it's a conspiracy theroy right up there with that Joe kennedy jr. story earlier....

Have fun!

Keith

This whole workin' for a living thing does get in the way of so many things....
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by wdolson2 on Tuesday, January 3, 2006 8:17 PM
 T_Terrific wrote:
 hudskit wrote:

Wow- where did all the aircraft go?

As I understand from some friends of mine in the UK, England literally dumped them into the ocean to avoid paying for them



I once talked to a former USAAF pilot who went in late enough he never got sent over seas.  Instead, his job at the end of the war was flying newly finished P-40s from the factory to the boneyard in Kingman, Arizona.  He'd taxi up the plane, and they would come out and cut the nose off.

There were so many nearly completed planes on the production lines at the end of the war that it was easier to make them airworthy and then fly them to a recycling plant.

Bill
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by wdolson2 on Tuesday, January 3, 2006 8:21 PM
 rudy_102 wrote:
 wdolson2 wrote:

After WW II every country who was involved, winner or loser had a decade or more of hard times, except the US.  The US was the only major combattant that came out of the war with a stronger economy than when the war started.

Bill

wdolson, sweden provided bofors guns to germany and the allies, so they also gained from the war because their netrality allowed them to buy and sell from both sides



Note I said "major combatant".  Sweden wasn't even a minor combatant.

Bill
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by wdolson2 on Tuesday, January 3, 2006 8:52 PM
 rudy_102 wrote:

 Bgrigg wrote:
I personally believe Lindbergh would have been one of the best aces (he actually shot down an enemy plane while flying as a "civilian" observor) but I don't think he would have willingly fought in the European theatre. Shame, really, his accomplishments were almost eclipsed by his personal short-comings.

 

Actually, Lindbergh flew Corsairs on bombing missions in the Pacific, according to the December 2005 issue of Flight Journal, flying with VMF 331, Group 31, off Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands.



Lindbergh did the majority of his flying in P-38s.  Though he did fly with the Marines a bit before going to New Guinea.  http://www.charleslindbergh.com/wwii/

Bill
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, January 3, 2006 10:50 PM
What is so amusing about a "trivia quiz" like this is that with the Internet available to all, we might as well be contesting factoids about nude-coed table tennis rather than aviation.  Anybody can go look up anything and come up with the same non-answers.  I have never seen such a raft of misinformation promulgated by people probabably none of whom have ever flown or even seen any of the aircraft they're talking about.  (Yes, before I get flamed, I have flown a few of them...)

There was a time when we relied on personal knowledge.  Today, you simply type in "P-51 Mustang" and find that it was a herd of 51 horses in Mexico that belonged to some North American.  Hey, I heard it on the Internet, it must be true...

Stephan
  • Member since
    March 2003
Posted by rangerj on Tuesday, January 3, 2006 10:51 PM

Hudskit,

I believe you are referring to the Lockheed Electre 10-E (NR16020) ordered by Purdue University and flown by Amelia earhart. It had uprated engines and additional fuel and oil tanks for her "around the world" attempt. The conspiracy theory is that she was sent by the U.S. Govt. to spy on the Japanese fortifications in the South Pacific. She was, according to the conspiracy theary, shot down by the Japanese, taken prisoner, and executed. The theary has little if any credibility. AE and the navigator Fred Noonan, had reserve commissions in the Navy. At that time most experienced pilots were given reserve commissions in the Navy or Army. 

Secondly there was a high altitude Electra Model 10, pressurized if I remember right, that has been thearorized to have been built for Earhart and the spy mission. No connection has ever been made between the aircraft and Earhart. In fact the aircraft was built after AE left on her flight into history! I'm not sure of the designation but U-36 comes to mind.

  • Member since
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  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Wednesday, January 4, 2006 1:58 AM
 yardbird78 wrote:
 RemcoGrob wrote:

So then I can ask a question: Name two types fighter planes that where used by the french airforce in 1940 and where made by a foreign (a non-french) manufacturer?  Please note the the types, at least, must have been delivered before the fall of France, so no p-38's or p-39's etc. (which where on order but never deliverd)

Gentlemen, please, let's leave out the discussions of politics about Lindbergh, Hitler, Roosevelt, Churchill, etc and concentrate on the original theme of this thread, ie, aircraft trivia questions.

In reference to the above question by RemcoGrob,

France operated 98 of the US made Curtis 75 Hawk and 50 of the Dutch made Koolhaven FK.58.

Darwin, O.F. Alien [alien]

Koolhaven FK-58                                                                                                                           

Curtis Hawk 75

Your anwser is totaly correct (just a slight misspelling, it's "Koolhoven")

So, according to the rules, you are allowed to ask a new question........

  • Member since
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  • From: 40 klicks east of the Gateway
Posted by yardbird78 on Wednesday, January 4, 2006 2:41 AM

A certain gentleman was the first to fly the B-36, the first to fly the YB-60, the first to fly the B-58 and the first to log 100 hours supersonic time.  What was his name? 

I had the pleasure of meeting this man during a tour of the Paul E Garber Storage and Restoration Facility in Silver Hill, Maryland in 1999 and then to listen to his presentation later that evening on his life as chief test pilot for Convair.

Darwin, O.F. Alien [alien]

 ,,

The B-52 and me, we have grown old, gray and overweight together.

  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, January 4, 2006 3:20 AM
Was it James Edmundson or  Curtis LeMay?
  • Member since
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  • From: 40 klicks east of the Gateway
Posted by yardbird78 on Wednesday, January 4, 2006 3:32 AM

 Nick wrote:
Was it James Edmundson or  Curtis LeMay?

Neither.

Darwin, O.F. Alien [alien]

 ,,

The B-52 and me, we have grown old, gray and overweight together.

  • Member since
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  • From: Ontario, Canada
Posted by rudy_102 on Wednesday, January 4, 2006 11:23 AM
Was he Beryl Erikson?
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  • From: 40 klicks east of the Gateway
Posted by yardbird78 on Wednesday, January 4, 2006 12:16 PM

 rudy_102 wrote:
Was he Beryl Erikson?

That is correct.  Your turn to ask a question.

Darwin, O.F. Alien [alien]

 ,,

The B-52 and me, we have grown old, gray and overweight together.

  • Member since
    December 2005
Posted by hudskit on Wednesday, January 4, 2006 7:22 PM

Rangerj- very well done- the actual experimental high altitude version of the 10-e was the XC-35- and this was the airplane that Amelia was rumoured to have used on her last flight- with the ability to fly higher/faster than her "standard" 10-E she would have been able to overfly the mandated islands and land at Howland Island in the same amount of time as a straight line trip in her standard aircraft.

That was the easy one of the 2- now how about the other high altitude/pressurized version of the Lockheed electra and the connection between the 2 aircraft?

This whole workin' for a living thing does get in the way of so many things....
  • Member since
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  • From: New Jersey
Posted by Matt90 on Wednesday, January 4, 2006 8:31 PM
Are you trying to get at the L-188 Electra turboprop that was named after Amelia Earhart's plane? Oh, and Amelia used a 10-E, no controversy there, not an XC-35. As far as I know, there were no production pressurized versions of the Electra. However, I think there were aftermarket companies that pressurized and turbopropped the little planes to turn them into executive aircraft.
''Do your damndest in an ostentatious manner all the time.'' -General George S. Patton
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  • From: Ontario, Canada
Posted by rudy_102 on Wednesday, January 4, 2006 8:46 PM
k guys, my question: what was the very first operational all metal monoplane in service in europe?
  • Member since
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  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Thursday, January 5, 2006 2:31 AM

 rudy_102 wrote:
k guys, my question: what was the very first operational all metal monoplane in service in europe?

If you mean a fighter, I think it's the Junkers D.1

If you mean a passenger aircraft, I think it's the Junker F.13

  • Member since
    March 2003
Posted by rangerj on Thursday, January 5, 2006 9:48 AM

Hudskit,

The XC-35 was the pressurized, turbosupercharged, "Electra".  The fuselage was not an Electra fusuelage, but was rounded. The wings and epinage were the same as the Electra. This one-off aircraft is now at the National Air and Space Museum and will be restored and displayed. Lockheed started the production numbers of the model 10 at 1001 and ended them at 1145. AEs Electra was number 1055. The XC-35 had its unique production number because it was a one-off experimental aircraft built for the USAAC (no.3501). The USAAC received the Collier Trophy for its experimental work with the XC-35.

The rest of the Model 10s that were military are as follows (taken from Lockheed production records and U.S Government records);

XR-20-1(no.1052) was built for the Navy.

XR30-1 was built for the Coast Gaurd (no.1053)

Y1C-36 - 3 of these model 10s were built for the USAAC (no.s 1071, 1073, and 1074)

C-36A (UC-36-LO) 15 commercial model 10s were "impressed" into military service (drafted!) during WWII and surviving aircraft were returned to civilian service.

C-36B (UC-36B LO) 5 model 10Es were also "impressed" into military service during WWII

C-36C and (UC-36C-LO) 7 model Bs were impressed into service

Y1C-37  (C-37 and UC-37-LO) was ordered by the War Department but instead of going to the AAC it went to the National Gaurd Bureau to serve as a transport for its chief.

Would the XC-35 have helped AE  IF her flight was a spy mission? It would have been an advantage to fly at higher altitudes in order to conserve fuel, as well as take advantage of tail winds, but the photographic equipment at the time would have been nearly useless at high altitude. Plus the sky in the South Pacific are almost always cloudy. It would be pure chance to get a clear sky upon arrival over the Japaneese mandated islands the Navy was interested in. The Navy had intelegence that the Japaneese were fortifying (military fortifications) their mandated islands, in violation of the Treaty entered into at the end of WWI. Again the XC-35, the one and only one XC-35, is at the NASM and no connection to AE has ever been made.

  • Member since
    December 2005
  • From: Ontario, Canada
Posted by rudy_102 on Thursday, January 5, 2006 11:13 AM
 RemcoGrob wrote:

 rudy_102 wrote:
k guys, my question: what was the very first operational all metal monoplane in service in europe?

If you mean a fighter, I think it's the Junkers D.1

If you mean a passenger aircraft, I think it's the Junker F.13

It's a fighter. Let me correct myself: what was the first mass-produced all-metal monoplane in Europe. Hint: It's a Polish design

  • Member since
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  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Thursday, January 5, 2006 1:14 PM
 rudy_102 wrote:
 RemcoGrob wrote:

 rudy_102 wrote:
k guys, my question: what was the very first operational all metal monoplane in service in europe?

If you mean a fighter, I think it's the Junkers D.1

If you mean a passenger aircraft, I think it's the Junker F.13

It's a fighter. Let me correct myself: what was the first mass-produced all-metal monoplane in Europe. Hint: It's a Polish design

The Junkers was a production aircraft, but since you are after a polish design I'm just going the say the first aircraft that's on my mind: the PZL-7

  • Member since
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Posted by rangerj on Thursday, January 5, 2006 2:20 PM

Hudskit,

I'm not sure what "2nd" aircraft you're referring to, but the experiments with the XC-35 did lead to turbosupercharging that allowed higher altitudes of most of the U.S. aircraft e.g. P-38, P-47, P-51 and the bombers. The work on the pressurized cabin led to the pressurized B-29. While the XC-35 was not solely responsible for the advances it certainly contributed.

If this is not what you're are referring to how about a hint? 

  • Member since
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  • From: Ontario, Canada
Posted by rudy_102 on Thursday, January 5, 2006 2:35 PM
 RemcoGrob wrote:
 rudy_102 wrote:
 RemcoGrob wrote:

 rudy_102 wrote:
k guys, my question: what was the very first operational all metal monoplane in service in europe?

If you mean a fighter, I think it's the Junkers D.1

If you mean a passenger aircraft, I think it's the Junker F.13

It's a fighter. Let me correct myself: what was the first mass-produced all-metal monoplane in Europe. Hint: It's a Polish design

The Junkers was a production aircraft, but since you are after a polish design I'm just going the say the first aircraft that's on my mind: the PZL-7

The P.7 was a prototype (as far as i know), but it is a PZL craft(the one im thinking about)

  • Member since
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  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Thursday, January 5, 2006 3:33 PM

As far as I know the world's first mass-produced all-metal combat aircraft was the Topolev ANT 3 (R-3).

See this link: http://www.aeronautics.ru/archive/vvs/tupolev/tupolev_design_bureau_aircraft.htm

The PZL aircraft that the P.7 was the forerunner of was the PZL P11.

See this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PZL_P.11

As far as I know, this answers both questions.

  Tom Cowboy [C):-)]

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
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Posted by hudskit on Thursday, January 5, 2006 5:31 PM
 rangerj wrote:

Hudskit,

I'm not sure what "2nd" aircraft you're referring to, but the experiments with the XC-35 did lead to turbosupercharging that allowed higher altitudes of most of the U.S. aircraft e.g. P-38, P-47, P-51 and the bombers. The work on the pressurized cabin led to the pressurized B-29. While the XC-35 was not solely responsible for the advances it certainly contributed.

If this is not what you're are referring to how about a hint? 

Absolutely-

The source for this is "the Search for Amelia Earhart"-Joe Gervais -so please take into account this is a bit "tongue in cheek" circa 1965ish.

The story goes like this....

If...you buy the possibility that Amelia was flying the 2nd XC-35(there are missing serial numbers in the chain at that point in Lockheed history)

If you buy the thought that she was brought down over the Marianas in a controlled crash (possibly shot down)

The technology  in this improved Lockheed 10 (which they had purchased a licensing fee for production) led to the design of the ......(you fill in the blank)

Andif you enjoyed this thee is the story of how the Japanes got the technology for the Emily.....

Gotta love those old books....and the old dudes that wrote them.

Cheers, keith

 

This whole workin' for a living thing does get in the way of so many things....
  • Member since
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  • From: Ontario, Canada
Posted by rudy_102 on Thursday, January 5, 2006 8:10 PM
 T_Terrific wrote:

As far as I know the world's first mass-produced all-metal combat aircraft was the Topolev ANT 3 (R-3).

See this link: http://www.aeronautics.ru/archive/vvs/tupolev/tupolev_design_bureau_aircraft.htm

The PZL aircraft that the P.7 was the forerunner of was the PZL P11.

See this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PZL_P.11

As far as I know, this answers both questions.

  Tom Cowboy [C):-)]

thanks for the correction then. P.7 it is. O, and the ANT-3's a bipe. I asked for a monoplane.

  • Member since
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  • From: Ontario, Canada
Posted by rudy_102 on Thursday, January 5, 2006 8:15 PM
Guys, I NEED HELP!!!!! I just finished Tamiya's 1/48 scale Mossie NF. Mk. XII, and built it with the bomb and gun bays doors opened. It came with the bombs, but I realized to late they don't have the colours for the bombs, nor do they have THE CANNONS!!!!!! Can anyone tell me how to paint the bombs and where I can get an inexpensive quad of Hispanos??? Pwetty pwease???
  • Member since
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Posted by rangerj on Thursday, January 5, 2006 11:18 PM

Keith,

The Gervais book is in my opinion the least credible of all the AE theary books. Anyway, the take off from Lae New Guinea is well documented, including film of the take off. The aircraft was the Lockheed Electra model 10-E as modified for AE. The aircraft was serviced and the service records are still in exsistance. The witnesses at Lae were interviewed many times and their story has remained consistant. Add to this the fact that the aircraft was serviced numerous times before Lae and that adds up to a lot of witnesses and a lot of records regarding a model 10-E Electra. Some of the original service records from the last flight are at Purdue University. The records, and many of AEs personal effects, were donated to the University by her husband G.P. Putnam. If that airplane was a special variation of the Electra, such as the XC-35, I would thing one of the hundreds of people who serviced it and/or saw it would have said something by now. The model 10 Electras were in service all over the world and the folks that serviced AEs aircraft were very familiar with the aircraft. They would have noticed if she were flying an XC-35.

The Lockheed company production records indicate that one and only one XC-35 was ever produced and it is right now, as we "speak", in the NASM in storage (I do not think it has been restored or displayed yet). It was in their Silver Hills MD storage facility the last time I personally saw it. Could there have been more than one XC-35? Yes, it is possible, but there is no evedence to date to support that assumption.

The Gervais book is just as bad as the news reporter from CA, Fred Goerner. Goerner's book also came out in the 60s and proposes the "spy-on-the-Japaneese" theory.

If you consider the question answered I get to ask a question, right? OK, since you brought up Amelia Earhart, a famed pioneer of aviation, what kind of aircraft did she learn to fly in? Historical Fact:: Orville Wright signed her pilots license, at that time issued by the Civil Aeronautics Adninistration (CAA). Cheers j

  • Member since
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  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Friday, January 6, 2006 3:53 AM

 rudy_102 wrote:
Guys, I NEED HELP!!!!! I just finished Tamiya's 1/48 scale Mossie NF. Mk. XII, and built it with the bomb and gun bays doors opened. It came with the bombs, but I realized to late they don't have the colours for the bombs, nor do they have THE CANNONS!!!!!! Can anyone tell me how to paint the bombs and where I can get an inexpensive quad of Hispanos??? Pwetty pwease???

 

please stop shouting and open your own topic!Sign - Off Topic!! [#offtopic]Disapprove [V]

  • Member since
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  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Friday, January 6, 2006 8:36 AM
 RemcoGrob wrote:

please stop shouting and open your own topic!Sign - Off Topic!! [#offtopic]Disapprove [V]

I agree. This is not the "Aircraft help forum", and your obtrusive manner is only going to aggrivate others more then getting you the help you are seeking.

As Remco suggests, it is very simple to start your own "string", and then you will not have to pick through other posts to see if you get your answer. Also, until it is answered, it will have the special catagory of "Unanswered topics", and that will get you more of the attention you need then your oversize lettering.

OK? Cowboy [C):-)]

 

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
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  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Friday, January 6, 2006 8:45 AM
 rangerj wrote:

If you consider the question answered I get to ask a question, right? OK, since you brought up Amelia Earhart, a famed pioneer of aviation, what kind of aircraft did she learn to fly in? Historical Fact:: Orville Wright signed her pilots license, at that time issued by the Civil Aeronautics Adninistration (CAA). Cheers j

Hi ranger!

Thanks for asking more of a "normal" question!Smile [:)]

As I understand, Amelia had heard of a woman pilot who gave flying instructions and shortly afterwards began lessons with pioneer aviatrix Anita "Neta" Snook at Kinner Field near Long Beach. Neta had restored a "Canuck", an old Canadian training plane.

However, in six months she managed to save enough money to buy her first plane. The second-hand Kinner Airster was a two-seater biplane painted bright yellow. Earhart named the plane “Canary,” and used it to set her first women's record by rising to an altitude of 14,000 feet.

So, are either one of those the one you were thinking of?

Tom T Cowboy [C):-)]

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

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