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Aircraft Trivia Quiz

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  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, January 7, 2006 5:10 PM
By the way, reading back up the thread a few posts...Douglas "Wrong-Way" Corrigan  <never> made a navigational error.  He knew perfectly well  where he was going (Ireland), and it was purely  a PR stunt (and a good one) that resulted in his telling a New York World reporter that he'd meant to fly to California but got things backward.

Stephan
  • Member since
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  • From: New Jersey
Posted by Matt90 on Sunday, January 8, 2006 9:14 AM
lol, yep  Edward Vernon Rickenbacher is correct.
''Do your damndest in an ostentatious manner all the time.'' -General George S. Patton
  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 8, 2006 9:24 AM
Okay, here's my question, and it's a three-parter:

1/Who died in the fiery crash of an airplane named after a hit song?

2/What was the <other> aviation feat that this poor unfortunate was noted for?

3/Who wrote the song?

Stephan
  • Member since
    June 2005
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by Matt90 on Sunday, January 8, 2006 8:02 PM
we need a hint
''Do your damndest in an ostentatious manner all the time.'' -General George S. Patton
  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 8, 2006 9:15 PM
"Hints" are difficult, because if you get at all specific ("Schneider Cup." "Convair," "ace" or whatever), anybody who knows how to do a Google search can easily find the answer, so I specifically tried to phrase the question(s) to avoid that.

This was a fairly spectacular event--especially if you were there--that happened within the lifetime of many members of this forum, judging by the comparative decrepitude of modelers, and short of telling you the answer, that's my hint.

Hey, you guys are supposed to be more knowledgeable than simply reciting which was the first jet to land on a carrier, the first 10-engine airplane, who the Enola Gay's bombardier was, or which piston-engine airplane holds this or that speed record, right?  My daughter knows the answers to those things, and she doesn't even build models...

C'mon, people, rise to the challenge.

Stephan
  • Member since
    December 2005
Posted by hudskit on Sunday, January 8, 2006 9:45 PM

I'd have to go with the 1949 Thompson trophy race and the fatal crash of the "Beguine" racer into a house bordering the racecourse- killing pilot, mother and child inhabiting the course. The "beguine" was named after a (then) popular sing- the pilot was Bendix trophy winner Bill Odom -who also had made several semi- famous long distance flights in a modified p-47.

If not this was it John Denver in the ultralight "Rocky Mountain High'?- don't think there was a great deal of fire but otherwise it seems to fufill your requirements.

Cheers, Keith

This whole workin' for a living thing does get in the way of so many things....
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Posted by hudskit on Sunday, January 8, 2006 9:58 PM

Ooops- by the way the song was Begin the Beguine- done by Artie Shaw but I believe written by Cole Porter.

A big hurrah for the decrepit modeling masses.....

Cheers, keith

This whole workin' for a living thing does get in the way of so many things....
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 8, 2006 10:52 PM
You guessed 'er, chester, and the floor is yours. 

To my embarrassment, I must admit that I was sure it was Hoagie Carmichael, whose son I knew when he was building the world's finest bamboo flyrods (true factoid), but Artie Shaw it is, improving on a Cole Porter piece.

Live and learn...

Stephan
  • Member since
    June 2005
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by Matt90 on Monday, January 9, 2006 6:17 AM
Was that plane you guys are talking about a forest green Mustang with wingtip air scoops? I have a book that has it in it and it was built around that time, then crashed before the race into a house killing two people. It also has musical notes and a few measures on the side.
''Do your damndest in an ostentatious manner all the time.'' -General George S. Patton
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, January 9, 2006 6:33 AM
Yes, that's the one.  The "wingtip air scoops" were in fact oil coolers.

Stephan
  • Member since
    December 2005
Posted by hudskit on Monday, January 9, 2006 6:55 AM

Actually they were the replacement radiators -the Beguine removed the large radiator belly scoop to clean up the airframe for racing- one of 2 P-51's to do it- the other being #45 (never being named)- which ended up being one of the fastest postwar racers.

These older racers are truly cool- but then so are today's Reno racers as well!

This whole workin' for a living thing does get in the way of so many things....
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, January 9, 2006 8:59 AM
You're absolutely right; I forgot they held the glycol radiators as well as oil coolers.

Stephan
  • Member since
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  • From: Baton Rouge, LA
Posted by T_Terrific on Monday, January 9, 2006 2:35 PM

OK-So what is the next question?

Tom TCowboy

“Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.”-Henry Ford

"Except in the fundamentals, think and let think"- J. Wesley

"I am impatient with stupidity, my people have learned to live without it"-Klaatu: "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

"All my men believe in God, they are ordered to"-Adolph Hitler

  • Member since
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Posted by hudskit on Monday, January 9, 2006 6:20 PM

okay...to keep in the Cleveland / reno theme- Please name the 2 prototype aircraft that ALMOST made it to the 1946 Thompson trophy race final- and the one that kinda...sorta...did...make the final but definately took the last place- and officially less than last place.

as a hint- one was a R-2800 powered airframe and one was a R-4360 powered aircraft.

 

 

This one's kinda tough.... Good luck to all!

This whole workin' for a living thing does get in the way of so many things....
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Posted by rdxpress on Monday, January 9, 2006 9:24 PM

I'm at work w/no resource info BUT my guess would be F8F Bearcat and F2G super corsair

Good Hunting, G.W.

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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, January 9, 2006 10:50 PM
I'm guessing the R-2800 airplane was Cook Cleland's original stock Corsair, which performed so badly that in '47 he went to the excellent F2G with the modified carburetor air scoop, but I don't know of anybody who ran an R-4360 in 1947.  I'm all ears.

Stephan
  • Member since
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  • From: Patuxent River, MD
Posted by Joe Hegedus on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 2:15 PM

There were 4 F2Gs that raced in '47, 3 were owned by Cleland (he flew one, Tony Janazzo flew another that crashed and killed him, and I don't recall offhand flew the 3rd, they were race numbers 74, 84 (crashed) and 94) and the 4th was owned and flown by Ron Puckett (race number 18).  No idea who might have had an R-4360-powered plane there in '46.

 

Cleland also had a pair of F2G's (the two survivors from '47) in the '48 races but didn't do so well, but in '49 he did very well with the same 2 planes from '48 with more mods and a third (race number 57) which was essentially box-stock except for removing the guns and gunsight.

  • Member since
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Posted by hudskit on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 8:06 PM

Time for hints- the key word is almost- the Super Corsairs were actually R-4360 aircarft that were released from navy Storage by intervention of Admiral William Halsey on behalf of Cook Cleland- war hero.

One prototype aircraft -the R-2800 one- made it to the prelim heat races during the pre-race week "warm-ups- was definately a "back-of the pack" aircraft demonstrating clearly the reasons for it's lack of success as a fighter design -had engine failure during a race and then fulfilled it's destiny as scrap metal immediately thereafter. 2nd hint- made it to the YP status- ....

 

the second aircraft was actually designed as a R-4360 aircraft -but not as a fighter- but the purchase of tone of the 2 prototype aircraft was stalled due to it's re-emrgence asa possible torpedo plane....(think dark blue) and was to be raced by it's company test pilot.

 

Good liuck guys!

 

This whole workin' for a living thing does get in the way of so many things....
  • Member since
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Posted by hudskit on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 8:09 PM

Oh- and the third of Cook's pilots was Dick Becker- very much still with us and still Cook's friend- I see them every year at the Society of Air Racing's symposium.

Cheers!

This whole workin' for a living thing does get in the way of so many things....
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Patuxent River, MD
Posted by Joe Hegedus on Wednesday, January 11, 2006 6:55 AM
 hudskit wrote:

Oh- and the third of Cook's pilots was Dick Becker- very much still with us and still Cook's friend- I see them every year at the Society of Air Racing's symposium.

Cheers!

 

Yes!  That's the guy!  Thanks.

  • Member since
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Posted by hudskit on Wednesday, January 11, 2006 9:27 PM

Well- I don't want to stall the thread any more than I have- the  prototype aircraft that almost made the Thompson are as follows:

The Curtiss YP-60E- R-2800 powered "successor" to the P-40 kinda looked like P-47- if you squinted enough. It lasted long enough to get a registration number and ( I think ) race number #79 - engine stopped in the middle of a heat race- gravity took over and no more YP_60E.

The second aircraft was the Boeing XF8B-1- after the program stalled at the end of the war one of the original program test pilots wanted to take one of the 2 prototypes racing- but the navy later reviewed that project  in light of their need to replace the Avenger with something a bit more "strike" fighterish-but it never came about. Having personally seen the F7F Tigercat lumber around the pylons at Reno (altho in a sprightly fashion)the thought of that huge aircraft pulling tight turns at the original cleveland course boggles the mind(kinda like a very very fast cargo van racing at daytona).

The third and final prototype actually raced - kinda- the XP-40 Q was also sold off as a racer postwar-it ran the elimination heats but only managed to become the alternate (in case someone did not start)- got confused -took off anyway at the start of the race- made it about 2 laps -blew the engine and belly landed it on some train tracks-end of  the coolest P-40 of them all.

These planes are cool-

Cheers, Keith

 

This whole workin' for a living thing does get in the way of so many things....
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Posted by rangerj on Wednesday, January 11, 2006 11:17 PM

hudskit,

Wasn't there a North American XAT-6E, an experimental inline engined AT-6 at the 1946 Cleveland air races. For you AT-6 fans, google the N A XAT-6E and you will find a very interesting conversion project!

While we are waiting for the next "official" question heres an easy one. Who was the first woman to fly through the sound barrier 1. in the U.S. and name the type of aircraft, and name the chase pilot. 2. name the other country and the pilot if you can. As to who was "first" is disputed and debated, or has been for a long time.

 

  • Member since
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  • From: 40 klicks east of the Gateway
Posted by yardbird78 on Wednesday, January 11, 2006 11:41 PM

1. Jackie Cochran

2. Canadair, F-86 Sabre

3. Chuck Yeager

May 18, 1953, over Rogers dry lake, Edwards AFB, CA

 ,,

The B-52 and me, we have grown old, gray and overweight together.

  • Member since
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  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Thursday, January 12, 2006 7:46 AM
 rangerj wrote:

hudskit,

Wasn't there a North American XAT-6E, an experimental inline engined AT-6 at the 1946 Cleveland air races. For you AT-6 fans, google the N A XAT-6E and you will find a very interesting conversion project!

While we are waiting for the next "official" question heres an easy one. Who was the first woman to fly through the sound barrier 1. in the U.S. and name the type of aircraft, and name the chase pilot. 2. name the other country and the pilot if you can. As to who was "first" is disputed and debated, or has been for a long time.

 

I found this short "how to"on that converzion:

 

http://www.geocities.com/t6modeling/xat6e.html

  • Member since
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Posted by rangerj on Thursday, January 12, 2006 2:43 PM

Right on YB. A little know fact is that the F-86 could be taken through the sound barrier in a dive. JC repeated the sound breaking flight with Yeager in an F-104 as well as a T-38. If I remember correctly she did double the speed of sound and was also the first woman to do so. The other claimed first woman to go through the sound barrier was a Russian woman pilot whos name escapes me at the moment.  YB. do you remember hearing about any control problems with the F-86, like aileron reverse, in high speed dives?

 

  • Member since
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  • From: 40 klicks east of the Gateway
Posted by yardbird78 on Thursday, January 12, 2006 4:09 PM
 rangerj wrote:

Right on YB. A little know fact is that the F-86 could be taken through the sound barrier in a dive. JC repeated the sound breaking flight with Yeager in an F-104 as well as a T-38. If I remember correctly she did double the speed of sound and was also the first woman to do so. The other claimed first woman to go through the sound barrier was a Russian woman pilot whos name escapes me at the moment.  YB. do you remember hearing about any control problems with the F-86, like aileron reverse, in high speed dives?

Jackie Cochran set several speed records in 1963 and 1964 flying an F-104 as a Lockheed test pilot.  On May 11, 1964, she hit Mach 2 in the Starfighter, the first woman to do so.

The F-86A orginally had a conventional horizontal stab, ie, fixed position with only the trailing edge being moveable for pitch control.  When the speed approached Mach 1, usually in a dive, the elevator became totally ineffective or even reversed at this "compressability" point.  Someone came up with the idea of the all moving stab and this cured the control problem.  All high speed fighters since then have had the all moving stab for this reason.

Darwin, O.F. Alien [alien]

 ,,

The B-52 and me, we have grown old, gray and overweight together.

  • Member since
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  • From: 40 klicks east of the Gateway
Posted by yardbird78 on Thursday, January 12, 2006 4:15 PM

New Question:

SR-71 tail number 17972 set a New York to London speed record on September 4, 1974, of 1 hr 54 min, 56.4 seconds.  A few days later on September 13, this same aircraft established a initial record for London to Los Angeles at 3 hrs, 47 minutes, 35.8 seconds.

1. The easy question: Name the pilots and RSOs for these two flights.

2. The hard question: At the end of the second record flight, a very unusual event occured.  Describe that event, to include the people involved, the incident and the aftermath.  I bet that you won't find the answer to this question on any Google search.

Darwin, O.F. Alien [alien]

 ,,

The B-52 and me, we have grown old, gray and overweight together.

  • Member since
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Posted by rangerj on Thursday, January 12, 2006 9:58 PM

1st. Flight Beale to Farnborough:

Pilot Maj. James V. Sullivan

RSO Maj. Noel F. Widdifield

Return flight:

Pilot Capt. Harold B. Adams

RSO Maj. William C. Machurek

While decending and decellerating the Blackbird suffered a compressor stall and did not get subsonic as far away from LA as planned. The sonic boom caused substantial damage to LA suburbs.

I was in Oxnard CA at the time and remember thinking "what the @#%& was that". It was different than the usual tremmors they get in CA. I never did get used to the earth moving on a regular basis.

  • Member since
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  • From: 40 klicks east of the Gateway
Posted by yardbird78 on Thursday, January 12, 2006 10:25 PM
 rangerj wrote:

1st. Flight Beale to Farnborough:

Pilot Maj. James V. Sullivan

RSO Maj. Noel F. Widdifield

Return flight:

Pilot Capt. Harold B. Adams

RSO Maj. William C. Machurek

While decending and decellerating the Blackbird suffered a compressor stall and did not get subsonic as far away from LA as planned. The sonic boom caused substantial damage to LA suburbs. I was in Oxnard CA at the time and remember thinking "what the @#%& was that". It was different than the usual tremmors they get in CA. I never did get used to the earth moving on a regular basis.

You are 100% correct as to the four crew members and partially correct as to the unusual event.

What I had in mind was that the unplanned sonic boom caused several windows to be broken in Zsa Zsa Gabor's house.  She raised a big stink about it with the USAF and demanded that "those responsible" personally apologize to her and reimburse her for her losses.  Obviously, the monetary portion of the event was of little consequence to her.  She wanted the two record setters to be her personal overnight guests so that she could brag to her friends about it.  TDY orders were cut,along with a check for the amount of damages and the two "heroes" dutifully traveled to her home, made their official apologies and spent the night at her house.  In those days, wives were not allowed to accompany sponsors on TDY trips, so the two guys suffered through their "patriotic duty" while the two wives fussed and fumed back at Beale.

Darwin, O.F. Alien [alien]

Your turn for a question.

 

 ,,

The B-52 and me, we have grown old, gray and overweight together.

  • Member since
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Posted by rangerj on Friday, January 13, 2006 12:33 PM

YB,

Now that's funny. It give a whole to meaning to the phrase "come to attention". Orders are orders! Was "Green Acres" a big TV show at that time?

A drill sgt. told this story while we were having a few cold glasses of milk at the NCO club. He was ordered to assist in teaching a company of brand new WAC recruits close order drill. He forgot just how new they were and while getting them "formed up" gave the order "ladies pick up your dress". They all did exactly as ordered.

In July of 1957 an new transcontinental (CA to NY) flight record was set. Who was the pilot and what was the aircraft type? The publicity landed the pilot on a very popular "game show" (at that time). What was the name of the game show? Bonus points if you can name the wingman.

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