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Building Models at School

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  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: Michigan
Building Models at School
Posted by silentbob33 on Monday, April 17, 2017 5:44 PM

I inadvertantly hijacked Mike Brindos' P-47 thread with this, and he wanted to see more pictures, so I thought I'd just make a separate thread here.  This is a new class I'm teaching this year where I assign the kids a model kit to build and research.  They do the research together and create a presentation for the rest of the class.  I gave the kids the basics on how to assemble and paint a model, and a few tips for some of the students that were excelling.  It was great to be able to share something I love doing with my students (though they were astounded by the concept of a stash) and they are genuinely enjoying building the models.  Despite the frustrations of losing parts and ripping decals, they are really taking to it.  One of them has already taken up the hobby.

I was inspired by an episode of James May's Toy Stories where he got a class of 8th graders to build a 1/1 Spitfire based off of the old Airfix molds.  As awesome as that would be, I don't have a budget like that to work with.  I proposed building conventional kits to the school administration and they loved the idea.  

I feel like I need to give a lot of thanks to Squadron for their help in making this idea an affordable reality.  These are all 1/72 Hobby Boss Easy Assembly kits.  First are some group pictures, then the best plane of each type.  Wednesday we'll start assembling some German aircraft, and I'll post those pics after we finish.

The colors may not be right (have to work with what's available) but they look good for some first timers.

On my bench: AMT X-Wing (1/48ish?) rebuild

  • Member since
    November, 2016
Posted by elation on Monday, April 17, 2017 5:54 PM

That is awesome!!

when i was in fifth grade, we had a "science after class" and we just brought models to class to build. 

I rememer building the 1/48 Academy F-14 kit. I think I was the only one who painted Kits. 

Did  school supply the kits and paint? how much are those planes?

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: Michigan
Posted by silentbob33 on Monday, April 17, 2017 6:02 PM

The school paid for the kits and reimbursed me for the tools and paints.  Squadron gave me a discount for the kits, which normally retail for around $10 give or take.  The paints and tools I picked up from Hobby Lobby or Michaels and are Testor's or Model Master enamels.  

On my bench: AMT X-Wing (1/48ish?) rebuild

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Monday, April 17, 2017 6:05 PM

Is this an after school thing or in classroom thing? ie: Technology class

While I think is awesome but not sure how it fits into the curriculum or your state education standards. I guess each state is different when it comes to education requirements/needs.

I'm not trying to put a damper on things just so you know. I work in the education sector.

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: Michigan
Posted by silentbob33 on Monday, April 17, 2017 6:09 PM

This is an actual class I titled "History in Scale."  It counts as a social studies credit and a visual/performing/applied arts credit.  The class is all juniors and seniors.

On my bench: AMT X-Wing (1/48ish?) rebuild

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Northern New Jersey
Posted by Tojo72 on Monday, April 17, 2017 6:10 PM

Very good idea on expanding the hobby,and some nice work also. It make history cone alive and teaches hand skills.

Somewhat surprised that the PC Police haven't put a stop to it.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Monday, April 17, 2017 6:10 PM

silentbob33

This is an actual class I titled "History in Scale."  It counts as a social studies credit and a visual/performing/applied arts credit.  The class is all juniors and seniors.

 

 

Nice!

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: Michigan
Posted by silentbob33 on Monday, April 17, 2017 6:14 PM

Tojo72

Very good idea on expanding the hobby,and some nice work also. It make history cone alive and teaches hand skills.

Somewhat surprised that the PC Police haven't put a stop to it.

 

I'm surprised I haven't had any complaints about it.  I've spoken to a few parents about it at conferences and they all think it's awesome.  I've got the president of the school board on my side too which also helps.  I just think it's awesome I get to help kids build models at school. Propeller

On my bench: AMT X-Wing (1/48ish?) rebuild

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Monday, April 17, 2017 6:17 PM

For first timers they put me to shame.....  Way to go!!

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Monday, April 17, 2017 7:44 PM

Bob, Good work! Model building is all positive with history, developing skills, accepting challenges, interaction, stimulating the brain and instilling pride. What could be better? Oh, I forgot fun which should be incorporated in all learning. I'm sure I've missed other benefits but thumbs up on your concept! I'm impressed! Wow!

Max

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by steve5 on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 1:10 AM

where were you when I was at school bob , that is just so awesome .

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 2:00 AM

Thats a really great idea. Not only are they doing somthing other than looking at a phone, but doing the research into the subject as well. And some very nice models there.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

  

On the bench: Trumpeter 1/35th AS90   

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • From: Streetsboro, Ohio
Posted by Toshi on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 2:31 AM

As I mentioned, in M.Brindos's P-40 thread, As a teacher you're doing a fantastic job and I commend you for your hard work and teaching the next generation the art of modeling.  Eespecially having these young adults research work.  We need more teachers like you!

Toshi

 

Retired due to work related injury

Married to the most caring, loving, understanding, and beautiful wife in the world.  Mrs. Toshi

 

ON THE BENCH:

Revell B-17G Flying Fortress 

NEXT BUILD:

Mrs. Toshi just purchased for me a Tamiya 1/48 Ki-61 via eBay, when it arrives, as always, I’ll do a WIP.  Thanks to M.Brindos and Model Maniac for the heads up and the inspiration in obtaining this kit for my next build.

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: Michigan
Posted by silentbob33 on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 6:46 AM

Thanks guys, it's been a blast this year.  Hopefully I'll be able to keep going with it over the years.  I'll need to look into branching out into other genres as well (armor, ships, etc.).  It's been very hard not to open up a box for myself though, or to bring in one of my own projects...

On my bench: AMT X-Wing (1/48ish?) rebuild

  • Member since
    September, 2011
  • From: Milaca, Minnesota
Posted by falconmod on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 7:45 AM

My kids are home schooled/public schooled.  And every month we have a co-op class where all the family's come  in and have classes,   we've had Doctors come in a teach cellular structure also geography classes, etc etc.

At least once a year for a semester sometimes 2 to have a modeling class where I teach the kids how to assemble and finish plastic models.  i've gone from 8 kids to now 15!

I'll have to start adding some history to the class aswell.

John

On the Bench: 1/72 Amodel I-270, 1/72 Heller Lansen J.32

Italeri 1/72 Mirage 2000C

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 9:23 AM

I remember, I think it was about fourth grade, where we had a craft class, and could bring in any craft project and work on it.  Plastic models were quite new- I brought in a stick and tissue flying model.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 10:27 AM

In the seventh grade, 1956 I think, we had a school activity period and one of my favorite teachers of all time organized a model airplane club and each of us was to build a Guillows stick P-51. What fun! I was already a plastic builder but I think he was the guy that really started me down the path. I kept in touch with him for most of my life even driving 70 miles one way to see him and his basement collection occasionally.

The moral of the story is that kids are influenced by teachers. Encounters can have lifetime effects whether guidence or support and sparking interests in life. All good!

Keep up the good work Bob!

Max

  • Member since
    October, 2016
  • From: Somewhere in Ohio...
Posted by DasBeav on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 11:25 AM

"History in Scale" would be a class I would love to take. Like the idea of branching out...Maybe "Evolution of Flight or Automobile". Your students did a great job, looking foward to next years batch.

Sooner Born...Buckeye Bred.

 

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: Michigan
Posted by silentbob33 on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 1:40 PM

Thanks for the comments guys.  A lot of the underclassmen have been asking about when they will get to build something so the anticipation is there.  Hopefully I'll be able to continue this class for many years.

On my bench: AMT X-Wing (1/48ish?) rebuild

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Lacey, WA.
Posted by M. Brindos on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 3:57 PM

I am in love with this concept, Bob. Absolutely love it!! This needs to spread all over.  :D

I would love to have such an opportunity as this. Very hard in this State.

- Mike Brindos

Figure Painting Moderator -- Genessis-Models

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 4:56 PM

Hi There Silentbob33;

    I have to tell you something that may burst your bubble . In 1954 we had shop class for the first time .The Boys got to build solid wood models and the Girls ( all three of them ) got to build birdhouses .

 The teacher chose the models based on the previous first week .That's when he saw how familiar we were with the tools needed . You know , the usual . Saws of different sizes , Hammers , clamps etc .

    I guess I was the luckiest , having a Tool and Diemaking Foster father , I was very familiar with the tools and adhesives needed . He chose for me a solid wood model of the Dornier D-OX Seaplane . It had all of twenty parts . The rest I had to come up with as the model progressed .

   We were graded on the class by how well our project was done and if we finished it in the time allowed . I built four for the year , the Dornier , A Speed Boat , A Small House and a Car . The next year I was moved to the sophomore class with a 4.0 grade point average for constructive endeavors .

    I guess you could say I got bit by the model bug and built many REVELL kits as allowances allowed and each was a test to myself on how to do it better . Today I still use Photo-etch Box car walkways in 1/87 to create " Budget " ship rails . This I teach to beginners .

  I admire what you are doing and would ask you  , please keep it up .You are a shining light in this world of overwhelming dependency on electronics for entertainment . Tanker - Builder      P.S.   The planes look great . A testament to your leadership and patience . Model On ! !

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: Michigan
Posted by silentbob33 on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 7:03 PM

It's awesome to hear about other's experiences with building models at school in their youth.  I would have loved the opportunity to build when I was in school.  It is a shame that there's less of a focus on skills in education these days.  There's too much focus on sending every kid to college, when not every kid will be successful in college.  College and Army have a few things in common, one of which is they are both not for everyone.  We're a very small school, about 120 students in the high school, so we have limits to what we can do.  My thinking outside the box seems to have done some good with these kids.  With any luck, I'll be teaching this class every year.  

A couple of years ago I had a student for independent study and I tested the concept of building models on her and gave her a 1/72 Airfix Spitfire.  Her dad built model cars so she could borrow his tools and supplies. She loved it.  The next semester she wanted to build something else and she ordered the 1/72 Academy B-29.  Over the summer she bought some more kits and they're sitting in my classroom.  I'll post some pictures of those too.

Tomorrow's the big day for the last batch of kits.  We'll be building Fw190-A, Bf109-G, Ju87D, and one student will be building a Me262 (limited selection, oh well...he's happy about it).  Maybe just for fun I'll bring in a complex kit from the stash just to show them how intricate they can get Whistling

On my bench: AMT X-Wing (1/48ish?) rebuild

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Lacey, WA.
Posted by M. Brindos on Friday, April 21, 2017 1:51 AM

Well how is it going?? Did you bring in a more advanced kit for them to see? If so, what did they think??

Have you shown them what loads of practice can accomplish??

I need more of this story.  :D

- Mike Brindos

Figure Painting Moderator -- Genessis-Models

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: Michigan
Posted by silentbob33 on Friday, April 21, 2017 10:00 AM
I haven't brought in a more advanced kit yet, I'll try to remember to bring one in on Monday, only problem is which one? There are so many to choose from... I've thought about bringing some of my finished kits in to show what can they can do with time and practice. Maybe the Me262 I finished a few months ago or the F-4 I built awhile ago. This also reminds me that I need to take pictures of those other models I was talking about.

On my bench: AMT X-Wing (1/48ish?) rebuild

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Friday, April 21, 2017 3:05 PM

Great job Bob with getting model building into your curriculum and past all the bureaucracy.  Any more, if it cannot be measured by some standard test or taught on an Ipad, its not worthy.  I have taught model aviation and rocketry afterschool programs and it got complicated with the many requirements needed to be met just to have a tube of glue and an exacto blade in the class.   

Its like there is an attitude that heaven forbid, we let anyone under the age of 18 have a tube of glue and a sharp object. They will sniff the glue and then cut on themselves.  Kinda sad how some school districts view themselves.

All of those models look fantasitic, those kids did really well and again, compliments to the instuctor.  

So Bob, non of the girls in your class wanted to skip out to go see Beyonce?Big Smile

  • Member since
    February, 2003
Posted by Jim Barton on Friday, April 21, 2017 3:54 PM

Way to go! I like this!

"Whaddya mean 'Who's flying the plane?!' Nobody's flying the plane!"

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: Michigan
Posted by silentbob33 on Friday, April 21, 2017 4:44 PM

scottrc

So Bob, non of the girls in your class wanted to skip out to go see Beyonce?Big Smile

 

 

So far none of them have.  But at least I know what they're talking about. Wink

On my bench: AMT X-Wing (1/48ish?) rebuild

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: Michigan
Posted by silentbob33 on Friday, April 28, 2017 5:57 PM

On my bench: AMT X-Wing (1/48ish?) rebuild

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Monday, May 01, 2017 5:14 PM

Hi!

 The mention of the M.E.262 made me think of my Tamiya clear one . Now there's a neat challenge . Lightly emphasize the inner frame and detail out the rest with paint .

    Of course I had to wire and plumb mine . I had a class once where all the planes were the LINDBERG F--4D-1-Skyray . With the engine of course ! So I had the class build a cradle for the engine . Build the plane O.O.B. without the engine , and detail the bustin blazes out of it , outside the plane ! Lotsa fun , that class .

 Plus I sneaked in a bit of " Found Parts" ideas with them . Oh What fun that was ! .  T.B.

  • Member since
    March, 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Monday, May 01, 2017 8:41 PM

Bob, I love this concept.  The best way to teach history.  I could only wish my teachers were as inventive and creative as this.  Good job. 

John

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