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Squadron Green and White putty, difference?

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  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Thousand Oaks CA
Squadron Green and White putty, difference?
Posted by PaperPanzer on Wednesday, June 27, 2012 4:05 PM

So I recently popped down to the hobby shop, and stopped by the filler puttys. This is the first time I've seriously pondered this, but the title says it all, what the heck is the difference between the two puttys?Huh? The guy at the store said they were the same except for color (okay, that's pretty obvious Stick out tongue)

Both say "fast drying" on them...

Ideas?

Auctung! Panzer!

- "And now for something completely different..."- Monty Python's Flying Circus


  • Member since
    October, 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Wednesday, June 27, 2012 4:30 PM

As far as I know the only difference is the color - the white being easier to cover with lighter coloured paints.

Dre
  • Member since
    June, 2007
  • From: here, not over there
Posted by Dre on Wednesday, June 27, 2012 5:19 PM

The white formula seems to be a finer grit than the green stuff.  

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Thousand Oaks CA
Posted by PaperPanzer on Wednesday, June 27, 2012 7:42 PM

Dre

The white formula seems to be a finer grit than the green stuff.  

Does that mean it sands better than the green? (I only use the white putty.)

Milairjunkie- I was told by a different guy at the store that the green putty was better for dark colors.

Auctung! Panzer!

- "And now for something completely different..."- Monty Python's Flying Circus


Dre
  • Member since
    June, 2007
  • From: here, not over there
Posted by Dre on Wednesday, June 27, 2012 8:25 PM

PaperPanzer, it depends.  

When used as a filler, I've found the white putty to be very tractable to work with, but once cured it is oftentimes much more brittle than the green putty.  Used straight from the tube and fully dried, either one can be sanded and shaped easily; neither one polishes to a very high luster as they both retain that gritty character.  You have to look out as both types will melt the plastic if you use too much.  

I use them mixed very thin with Testor's cement and finely shaved sprue (mix all ingredients to a runny goop, shake or stir often and enjoy!) when gluing stuff together that has either small gaps or seam blemishes.   This mix can be polished to a very high luster with no visible seam or gap remaining, more so than using the putties as intended.  

hope that helps

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: State of Mississippi. State motto: Virtute et armis (By valor and arms)
Posted by mississippivol on Wednesday, June 27, 2012 8:45 PM

I switched to the white putty to make it easier to paint over. They both worked the same for me. If I'm going to have to rescribe lines, though, I use super glue.

Glenn

  • Member since
    February, 2007
Posted by mitsdude on Thursday, June 28, 2012 12:31 AM

I've read this white vs green many times over the years in many different forums. Has anyone ever asked Squadron what the difference is?

  • Member since
    August, 2004
  • From: UK
Posted by four-star on Thursday, June 28, 2012 3:13 AM

Used both for the first time a few weeks ago.  My immediate reaction without having read anything on it before (i.e. no bias) was that white was a finer grit/grade.  I started with the green and found that it was hard to work with as it was very gritty, and thought I may as well try the white instead as I had both.  It was much easier to work with.

  • Member since
    May, 2004
  • From: Dallas
Posted by KINGTHAD on Thursday, June 28, 2012 8:31 AM

This is what Squadron says about the putty. I have talked to one of the old owners and he said the formula for the  white is finer.

Thad

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Thousand Oaks CA
Posted by PaperPanzer on Thursday, June 28, 2012 5:25 PM

Dre

PaperPanzer, it depends.  

When used as a filler, I've found the white putty to be very tractable to work with, but once cured it is oftentimes much more brittle than the green putty.  Used straight from the tube and fully dried, either one can be sanded and shaped easily; neither one polishes to a very high luster as they both retain that gritty character.  You have to look out as both types will melt the plastic if you use too much.  

I use them mixed very thin with Testor's cement and finely shaved sprue (mix all ingredients to a runny goop, shake or stir often and enjoy!) when gluing stuff together that has either small gaps or seam blemishes.   This mix can be polished to a very high luster with no visible seam or gap remaining, more so than using the putties as intended.  

hope that helps

Thanks, I usually don't polish my models, though I didn't know about the melting plastic, I thought that was liquid or gel cement. My experiences with Testor's putty was a nightmare when I started the hobby some years ago, now Squadron's stuff is much more appealing. So far I have never seen any Tamiya Putty in my hobby shop, but I'll keep a sharp lookout. I have read in FSM that super glue filled areas polish cleaner than puttied ones. Hmmm... Hmm

Auctung! Panzer!

- "And now for something completely different..."- Monty Python's Flying Circus


  • Member since
    June, 2012
Posted by Compressorman on Thursday, June 28, 2012 7:24 PM

Not to change the direction of this post but since we are on the subject of putty. Does anyone use the bondo spot putty that is available in auto parts stores? I have never used it but have heard that a lot of people love it.

Chris

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: State of Mississippi. State motto: Virtute et armis (By valor and arms)
Posted by mississippivol on Thursday, June 28, 2012 7:49 PM

I used Bondo a long time ago, when my dad bought it to try it out. I didn't have any problems with it, thought it to be about the same as Squadron putty, and it is easier to get hold of than some of the hobby stuff.

Glenn

  • Member since
    February, 2007
Posted by mitsdude on Friday, June 29, 2012 12:39 AM

The main problem I have with the putty's mentioned is that they do not have a very long shelf life once they are opened.

I've made sure the caps and threads on the metal neck were clean. No air pockets in the tube. I've stored them in one of those food storage bags that sucks out all the air when you attach them to a special pump.

It hasn't made much of a difference.

They are stored inside my house and are not exposed to temperature extremes.

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Thousand Oaks CA
Posted by PaperPanzer on Friday, June 29, 2012 2:13 AM

MITSDUDE: Really? How long do they last for you? I am still using putty my dad had from the 80's, and it works fine.Confused

Auctung! Panzer!

- "And now for something completely different..."- Monty Python's Flying Circus


  • Member since
    March, 2006
  • From: Right Side of a Left State
Posted by Shellback on Friday, June 29, 2012 11:35 PM

I've got a tube of Bondo i use thats 30+ yrs old .

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Saturday, June 30, 2012 9:00 AM

I have only used the green Squadron Putty.

Of those who have used both white and green, do you have a preference?

  • Member since
    January, 2007
  • From: Charlotte, North Carolina
Posted by the doog on Saturday, June 30, 2012 9:24 AM

I've used both, and find no appreciable difference between them. I usually use the white just so it's easier to paint over and I can use it on cars.

My FOTKI model gallery with most of my best models can be found HERE

My real name is "Karl" Smile

Dre
  • Member since
    June, 2007
  • From: here, not over there
Posted by Dre on Saturday, June 30, 2012 9:26 PM

I prefer the green over the white, but just barely.  

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Sunday, July 01, 2012 9:46 AM

I've used the Bondo and it works fine and comes out cheaper than the Squadron tube in the long run. I've had issues with older tubes separating into a liquid and the red filler being more akin to Playdough when this happens.

  • Member since
    March, 2006
  • From: Right Side of a Left State
Posted by Shellback on Sunday, July 01, 2012 12:09 PM

Now that you mention it Rob i've had that issue also . I put a glob of it in an empty Tamiya paint jar and thin it with lacquer thinner .

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Edmonton, Alberta
Posted by Griffin on Sunday, July 01, 2012 3:51 PM

I've had my tube of green putty for about 8 years now - no problems.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Sunday, July 01, 2012 4:45 PM

Griffin

I've had my tube of green putty for about 8 years now - no problems.

How on earth do you get it to last that long. I am lucky if i get to use a quarter of the tube. My current has split and the bottom half thats left has gone rock hard and the stuff at the top isn't easy to use. I never get full use out of it.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Amusing Hobby 1/35th Lowe

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Thousand Oaks CA
Posted by PaperPanzer on Sunday, July 01, 2012 9:46 PM

Perhaps it's the climate, how you store the tube, or if you abuse it in any way (cracks, ect.)

Auctung! Panzer!

- "And now for something completely different..."- Monty Python's Flying Circus


  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by cadillac on Saturday, April 28, 2018 11:36 PM

Does it have an expiration or best used by date?                                                  (Similar to the two packages of Cheese I found in my Fridge that expired last September? I was about to make myself a Grilled Cheese Sandwich when I got the feeling I should check).   
I'm down to 1/2 Tube and I have to squeeze out a 1/4 inch or more to get to a soft enough part that's viable. I never ever leave it open and I bought this Tube three years ago.

Insanity, It's not just for the insane, it's fun too.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, April 29, 2018 12:38 AM

It's six years older now. I prefer Bondo Glazing Putty. Buy a fresh tube every year.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, April 29, 2018 7:11 AM

Hi ;

 I read this with interest . I have used 3-M Spot glazing putty in red  , now for over fifty five years . It's mainly for getting fine blemishes out of a car finish in primer befor the final coats of paint .

 I have used both Testors and Tamiya putties as well . The tube of Squadron I have now is about five years old . If I have to use hobby brand fillers I will usually use Squadron .The others seem a little soft and brittle when re-creating panel lines .

 I always make sure the tubes are stored top up in a rack made to accomodate the various sized tubes . Also , I definitely make sure I don't get those soft plastic tops cross-threaded ! You can accidently do this and air will sneak in there and the putty will also off gas through the fine opening you've created . rRsult , one tube shaped block of hardened filler !

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