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Aftermarket Parts Shopping

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  • Member since
    September, 2017
  • From: San Antonio, TX
Aftermarket Parts Shopping
Posted by SkyCopJC on Monday, September 11, 2017 4:44 PM

I might be beating a dead horse and, if so, apologies.

im just getting started with "serious" modeling and started into looking at aftermarket upgrades to a couple projects in my queue.  Turns out aftermarket is an odd duck, at least to me.

For those that buy resin/PE/whatever, how do you shop?  Buy the kit first and hope there's aftermarket available?  Research the aftermarket first, buy the matching kits?  Does it even matter if an upgrade says it's "made for ___ brand"?  I've shipped Squadron and Sprue Bros among a few others, where's the best place to finding the most inventory/availability?  I know scratch building is an entirely different option but I'm not there yet.

-Jay

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Monday, September 11, 2017 5:06 PM

Well, for someone just starting out, I recommend doing what you've done here, and ask in this and other forums.  Look in those forums and see if they have a subforum for new products (most do).

Finescale publishes a section on new products, too, including aftermarket sets of various kinds.

Do you have a modeling club near you?  Visit it, then, and talk to the members.  You'll get some good suggestions from them, too.

You'll get to recognize makers' names, then, too.  Eduard is one manufacturer that has a pretty wide range of sets, for a lot of different makers' kits, and different subjects.

You can order from vendors like Squadron and Sprue Brothers, but also look to see whether a particular aftermarket maker sells its products through its website.  You might get a better deal, than buying from a retailer.  Shop around, too.  Amazon.com might be useful, too.

eBay is another place to look.  I would search by the subject you're building, first, and then weed out results as you go.

Hope that helps!

Best regards,

Brad

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: Michigan
Posted by silentbob33 on Monday, September 11, 2017 5:24 PM
I have dabbled with aftermarket stuff, but not too seriously. I've used resin a few times with kits they weren't designed for and didn't have too many problems, just make sure you do a lot of dry fitting. I have less experience with photoetch, but I've heard it can be used with kits it's not designed for but you'd probably have to do more modifications to get it to fit. As far as where to get it, I think Baron covered all that I plus some more. Good luck!

On my bench: AMT X-Wing (1/48ish?) rebuild

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: MN
Posted by Nathan T on Monday, September 11, 2017 9:17 PM

Hannants in the U.K and EBay 

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Monday, September 11, 2017 9:40 PM

There are plenty of online stores to find AM parts. Compare prices before buying. There are others besides Sprue Brothers and Squadron.....

It all depends on what you want to do, be it cockpit upgrades, wheels. engines, seatbelts, etc...

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 12:31 AM

I build ships mostly so I know the market except...

wow, 3D is constantly changing everything.

otherwise I go for a kit and then look for AM

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 2:00 AM

I used to buys a kit and get every piece of AM i could for it. After after building a couple of Dragon panther kits i realised i was just throwing away good money.

My advice would be to get the kit, have a look at it, see what AM there is and then decide what you need. Also check any reviews, that way you can find out any errors in the kit that might need correcting.

AM sets can be used on kits they were not designed for. I recently bult a Fujimi Ju 87D and Academy Ju 87G, both 72nd, and addedan Aires resin pit designed for the Academy kit to both. It fit the Fujimi kit better than the Academy one. But somtimes it might not fit as well. And the AM instructions will indicate kit parts which will be different to the kit you have,

And just because you have an AM set, doesn't mean you have to use all of it. This is especially true with PE. Some things in PEsets area waste of time, such as brake lines.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

  

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/32nd Fw 190D-9    

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 6:17 AM

I agree with Bish. Almost half the AM stuff out there, you'll end up not seeing it once the kit is complete.

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 7:52 AM

Bish for the win!

Also, you may find an a/m item that says "for XYZ kit"...but was actually designed for a completey different kit, they just changed the name, to be able to sell the product.

For example...a while back, I built 3 A-7 Corsair II's...Fujimi, Italeri and HobbyBoss. I bought an Aires cockpit that said it was for the HobbyBoss kit. For one, it would have taken a LOT of modification to make it fit said kit. The other thing, the instruction clearly showed the "breakdown" of the Fujimi kit, which it did fit, with just slight modification to the kit parts. This particular a/m item could be found specifically for the Fujimi kit, as well...but there was absolutely no difference, no matter what kit it said it was for.

That has been my experience with Aires on several occasions.

Eduard seems to be quite good with there kit specific items, and are designed to fit the kit that is specified. You can use a set designed for XYZ kit on PYT kit, but you'll likely have to do some modification.

 

Only once, have I bought a/m before having the kit. I got a GREAT deal on a fairly extensive set for a 1/48 F-4. It was a $30 set, I got for $4. Took a while, but I finally found a decent deal on that F-4! Otherwise, like Bish said...get the kit, check it out, then decide what it might need.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 9:50 AM

SkyCop ;

 I see your'e from San Antonio . I am just up the road in New Braunfels . I go to Gary Emery at Hill Country Hobby on Bandera road at Ford's Landing . Gary has the books that will help , The knowledge and the Stuff for you to look at firsthand .

Plus there's always Hobby - Town On Vance Jackson off 410 .What do you like to build most ? Start from there . I have always bought the kit and books ( one or two ) then the P.E. . I do not by resin stuff .

 I got jimmied into that on the U.S.S. Alabama in 1/350 .Oh Just had to have the resin stuff . I bought it . 60.00$ worth . Guess what ? The Alabama Museum said the Kit right out of the box was correct as built . Now , No resin stuff for me .tried a car .(Not built yet , Beautifully molded parts , But only three of the four correct wheel covers )

 As I said , No More resin . Now I have my favorites of course , everyone does . I like Gold Medal For P.E. Tom's , the same . Eduard , Well them , because of awesome customer service and neat stuff . Consistent quality too .   T.B.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 10:02 AM

I usually buy the kit first, and either know what aftermarket stuff is available when I buy the kit, or I research it later.  I have sometimes seen some aftermarket stuff that makes me consider a particular model and kit, though I have yet to buy a kit just because of the aftermarket stuff, but I am close to that in a few cases.  These would be for a model I like, in any case.

Note that there are about three types of aftermarket stuff.  First is the optional package offered by the maker of the original fit.  You can be quite sure in that case that the aftermarket stuff will meld with the kit easily.  Second, there are things made for a particular kit, but by an independent mfg.  Less certainty here of good fit.  Third, you have a package or item for a kit in a certain scale, for a given prototype/subject.  In this case, depending on the kit you use, it may be an easy addition, or require a lot of adaption.  You may find some reviews online about the pairing, but you do need to do your homework, or be prepared for a job that may be even harder than scratch building.

Some mail order houses, in their catalog, will recommend particular aftermarket items for kits they sell- this is a nice way to see what is available.

Many experienced modelers recommend that a novice become proficient with basics, like seam filling, painting, etc.  before trying aftermarket.  Others say it is okay to introduce aftermarket at any experience level.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 11:17 AM

SkyCopJC

For those that buy resin/PE/whatever, how do you shop?  Buy the kit first and hope there's aftermarket available?  Research the aftermarket first, buy the matching kits?  Does it even matter if an upgrade says it's "made for ___ brand"?  I've shipped Squadron and Sprue Bros among a few others, where's the best place to finding the most inventory/availability?  I know scratch building is an entirely different option but I'm not there yet.

Not all aftermarket is created equal. Many PE sets like to include pieces parts for everything molded in place. Many times the flat metal does not replicate parts as well as the kit plastic. They seem to think more is better. There are often parts like grill screens and fender braces that are superior in metal. Eduard does "zoom sets" that provide just a token amount of useful items.

And yes, if a PE set is for Brand X, 99% of the time the set will only work for that brand kit due to variations in the different makers. But sometimes some items will work, and many times Brand X is the same kit in a different box than Brand Y.

About the only aftermarket item I tend to buy almost automatically is the tank gun tube. But sometimes the kit includes the barrel or the barrel is molded in a way that the kit one is just fine.

  • Member since
    September, 2017
  • From: San Antonio, TX
Posted by SkyCopJC on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 12:23 PM

Thanks, everyone, for the tips.  Good to know the little voice in my head wasn't entirely off the mark!

TB- I usually shop Hobbytown on VJ but their selection is limited lately, and their supplies are starting to get a bit scarce too for some reason.  I like to build 1:48 post WWII military aircraft, specifically targeting the ones in my to-do list.  I'll have to check out the other store you mentioned, didn't even know it was there.  

-Jay

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:30 PM

GMorrison

I build ships mostly so I know the market except...

wow, 3D is constantly changing everything.

otherwise I go for a kit and then look for AM

 

 
Excellent item to point out, GM!  I hadn't thought about 3D printing, but absolutely for ship models, and more and more for other subjects, too.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

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