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OT: Useless trivia.

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  • Member since
    November 2005
OT: Useless trivia.
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 9, 2003 12:53 PM
On this date, Sept. 9, in 1943 the allies kicked-off Operation Avalanche with the amphibious landings at Salerno, Italy.
A hearty "thank you" to the courageous men who took part in this endevour.
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by cnstrwkr on Tuesday, September 9, 2003 4:14 PM
My father-in-law was part of that invasion as a sergeant in a communication unit. He was captured a few days afterwards and escaped. He was 84 in May.
Tommy difficult things take time...the impossible, a little longer!
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Dahlonega, Georgia
Posted by lizardqing on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 3:17 PM
I agree, but I think it is anything but useless trivia, it would be nice if they started everyday in our schools with something like that just to remind kids these days what has been done before for them today.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Harrisburg, PA
Posted by Lufbery on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 3:30 PM
Hardly useless trivia. For what it's worth, V-J day (Sept. 2) was just last week and hardly got any notice. That's pretty sad. :(

Regards,

-Drew

-Drew

Build what you like; like what you build.

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 4:44 PM
I apologize for my choice of words. I realized after I posted that they were not right but because there had already been a post I chose not to edit to prevent any confusion. I will continue to post these as long as there is no complaint.
Maybe a history forum?
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Dahlonega, Georgia
Posted by lizardqing on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 9:33 PM
No complaints from me, I love to learn about all the stuff that somehow never made it in the history books we had in school.
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: NE Georgia
Posted by Keyworth on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 10:56 PM
Derek, you're spot on as usual. - Ed
"There's no problem that can't be solved with a suitable application of high explosives"
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 11:05 PM
Guys, if you read nothing else this year, get hold of a copy of D Day,
by Stephen E Ambrose (Yes, the Band of Brothers man)
It's chock full of facts, figures and humanity. And if it doesn't stir your
emotions, then there is something wrong with you!
I'm looking forward to tracking down the next one,
'Citizen Soldiers' The US Army from Normandy to Berlin
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 11, 2003 9:54 AM
Currently reading "Citizen Soldiers" and enjoying it, "D-Day" is next. Anothe good one by Mr. ambrose is "The Wild Blue".
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: NE Georgia
Posted by Keyworth on Thursday, September 11, 2003 8:23 PM
If you've read Dr. Ambrose's four volumes mentioned so far, you must read "The Victors", the third volume in ETO Army trilogy, as well as "Pegasus Bridge". And while you're at it, read "Comrades". It's full of insight about fighting men,as well as family. Good reading.
"There's no problem that can't be solved with a suitable application of high explosives"
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Thursday, September 11, 2003 8:52 PM
Hardly a useless piece of trivia there.

I have a friend in Australia, one day I was looking at my wall calendar and saw an occaision called "ANZAC Day" I knew it had military origins in the combined military forces of Australia and New Zealand during the World Wars, but I didn't know fully what.

I asked my friend about it, and she sent me some newspaper clippings about how it is a memorial, more that anything else, for the Australian and New Zealand soldiers that fell in the battle at Gallipoli in WWI.

As I read about it, it struck familliar ground and ran almost paralel with the Canadian experience at Dieppe in WWII.

Both ill planned campaigns based on poor intelligence reports resulting in a much higher casualty count than necessary.

According to the article my friend sent me, Gallipoli was Australia and New Zealand's single greatest wartime loss, just as Dieppe was Canada's.

Sad, but hardly useless trivia.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, September 12, 2003 12:55 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by lizardqing2

No complaints from me, I love to learn about all the stuff that somehow never made it in the history books we had in school.


What?? What school doesn't teach kids proper history? Its not like this is stuff like which farmer grew the largest watermelon in 1857! No offence, but I'm kinda shocked about that..
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, September 12, 2003 6:34 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Michaelvk
.... which farmer grew the largest watermelon in 1857!


I believe that honor went to Yoder Miller of Ottumwa, Iowa..
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