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Wood cabin

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  • Member since
    April, 2007
Wood cabin
Posted by Leddy on Sunday, October 29, 2017 10:12 PM

I am building Custom Dioramica Russian Hut and it is made of wooden logs with a thatched roof. I primed in grey and need some suggestions on which color to use as a base. I work in acrylics and have Tamiya, Acril, and Vallejo Model Air available. Any suggestions? I will use enamel washes from Mig or AK. All suggestions are appreciated!

thanks, Leddy

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Monday, October 30, 2017 4:39 AM

Hello!

This link might give you some ideas:

search results

Good luck with your build and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    April, 2007
Posted by Leddy on Monday, October 30, 2017 9:38 AM

Thank you! Great pictures!  Any suggestions for color base, shadows or highlights?

Leddy

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Monday, October 30, 2017 12:04 PM

I don't really know - basically what looks right! It'd probably be best to start with dark gray and lighten it gradually, with a shade of brown and sand. But unless you do a painted variant, which is unlikely in poor neighbourhoods, those things get discoloured pretty soon in the rough continental climate. Good luck with your build and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 3:20 AM

For wood finish I like oils.  Combinations of burnt, raw umber and sienna with a dark wash.  Depends what you're trying to do, dark or aged wood

 

 Here I used tans and greys with a wash to depict a damaged tree

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 4:25 AM

For work structures i stand with a light sand acrylic base coat and then use oils. As pawel said, for what you doing, what ever looks right.

keavdog, really like that tree stump.Great colour and texture on that.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

  

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/32nd Fw 190D-9    

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, November 05, 2017 4:40 PM

Probably largely up to your taste and the palette you are comfortable with.

When you build with logs, there are two basic strategies.  One is rough finished, the other is close finished.
With rough finish, you leave the logs generally round, only notching the ends and for openings.  The only work along the length of the log is to debark it (bark is not a good finish, interior or exterior--it peels off in the weather).

The other way is close finished, which is seen usually only where the trees are quite huge.  The classic example of this are Scandanavian log homes, which are often not but three "logs" tall (the logs being more than 1m in diameter).  So, slabs are taken off the felled logs which are turned into other building parts, leaving a 30-50cm thick center.

Close fininshed logs will show their interior look, and will weather to similar colors as milled lumber--pale grays and hints of silver, over a tan sort of base color.

Rough finished logs retain their outer sapwoor, which has more of an umber base with highlights of red and amber.

In either case, the meeting surfaces of the logs, one to another, has a circular shape which leaves a gap.  That gap is filled with "chinking" (also known as "daubing"), which is a mud and straw and clay mix (modern mixes use portland cement and flexible epoxies)

The chinking will have a pale gray clay color or it might be a mud-dark color (it will usually match the local "dirt" color to some etent).  A touch of moss/mildew will crust the top curve of the logs, and up on the bottom edge of the chinking.  Black-green is a good base for this, with additional greens to get to a comfortable mossy look.

For thatch roofing, I'd probably start with a base of khaki-drab, or whatever tan I had that had a greenish hue.  I'd build up lighter tan colors over that, and finish with a drybroush of Radome Tan or Unbleached Linen.

  • Member since
    April, 2007
Posted by Leddy on Monday, November 06, 2017 4:01 PM
Nice analysis! I will do a rough finish on the logs and use a number base. Should it be a raw umber and then darken it with an enamel wash or a burnt umber and try to lighten with a enamel wash or dry brushing? Thanks, Leddy
  • Member since
    April, 2007
Posted by Leddy on Monday, November 06, 2017 4:04 PM

Nice finishing! Is your wash acrylic over the oil paint in the top photo?

thanks, Leddy

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