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Base Construction help.

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  • Member since
    February, 2018
Base Construction help.
Posted by Sgt.HoundDog on Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:42 AM

Hi all!,

So I'm in need of some advice..

The other day I bought some oak boards, had them cut and milled. (all myself)

Now i'm trying to come up with a way to finish them to use them as base's for a display.

I'm having difficulty coming up with a solution. 
I bought stain and it turned out quite dark...but i'm looking for that nice "dresser" finish making it shiny etc...

Any advice?

Perfect example of a base I want to make from scratch would be from this link.

http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/m/online/1581021.aspx

 

V/R

-Hound

First model in 10 years! I'm happy with it!

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:45 AM

I make similar ones out of pine shelf board.

I simply stain and then use a clear gloss varnish. I normally add 2 coats of varnish, sand and then 1 or 2 more depending how glossy i want it.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Phantom FG.1

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by Sgt.HoundDog on Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:49 AM

So you sand after the 2nd coat?

What grit paper do you use?
What kinda Varnish?

I'm thinking 1000 grit and Johnsons clear coat.Big Smile

First model in 10 years! I'm happy with it!

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:56 AM

I use a Ronseal interiour wood varnish and a very smooth grit sandpaper, so proabably around the 1000 mark, would have to check tonight.

By Johnsons clear coat, i take it your talking about the floor polish. Not sure how that would sand, personally i prefer one for wood, but would probably work.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Phantom FG.1

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by Sgt.HoundDog on Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:58 AM

Bish

I use a Ronseal interiour wood varnish and a very smooth grit sandpaper, so proabably around the 1000 mark, would have to check tonight.

By Johnsons clear coat, i take it your talking about the floor polish. Not sure how that would sand, personally i prefer one for wood, but would probably work.

 

 

Thanks for the advice i'll give it a try.

V/R

-Hound

First model in 10 years! I'm happy with it!

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, April 19, 2018 8:07 AM

Hi ;

 When I am doing a  "furniture grade " Plate base I always thin my stain .That way I can get the tones I want instead of it being to dark . I use oak mostly (Cut-offs ) or close grained Pine .  

 I stain to the shade I want . Then I sand it with 1500 grit , ( with the grain only !) Till it is glass smooth . I restain with a wash of the stain then let dry for about a week . I lightly sand again . Extra Fine steel wool this time . Now for the tricky part.

 Spar varnish . I don't know if any are just for boats anymore . That is a better coating than regular furniture varnish . Thin and wipe it on just like a thin wash of stain . Let dry and use the Extra Fine steel wool on the surface .

 Now come back with an extra fine bristle brush for varnishing . Apply wet following the grain . No Runs please . Put a dust cover over it that can breathe without touching the surface of the item .

 After about a week come back and rub it down with a fine cloth infused with Bees-Wax! DONE !!! 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by Sgt.HoundDog on Thursday, April 19, 2018 8:16 AM

Tanker - Builder

Hi ;

 When I am doing a  "furniture grade " Plate base I always thin my stain .That way I can get the tones I want instead of it being to dark . I use oak mostly (Cut-offs ) or close grained Pine .  

 I stain to the shade I want . Then I sand it with 1500 grit , ( with the grain only !) Till it is glass smooth . I restain with a wash of the stain then let dry for about a week . I lightly sand again . Extra Fine steel wool this time . Now for the tricky part.

 Spar varnish . I don't know if any are just for boats anymore . That is a better coating than regular furniture varnish . Thin and wipe it on just like a thin wash of stain . Let dry and use the Extra Fine steel wool on the surface .

 Now come back with an extra fine bristle brush for varnishing . Apply wet following the grain . No Runs please . Put a dust cover over it that can breathe without touching the surface of the item .

 After about a week come back and rub it down with a fine cloth infused with Bees-Wax! DONE !!! 

 

 

 

Got any pictures? I'm kinda curious to see the end results; For two weeks of work. Big Smile

V/R 

-Hound

First model in 10 years! I'm happy with it!

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, April 19, 2018 8:37 AM

Does seem a lot of work TB. Mine take 2 or 3 days, depending if its a weekend and i end up with a nicely stained gloss piece of wood.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Phantom FG.1

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, April 22, 2018 3:32 PM

If you are in the States, probably the easiest thing is to go down to the home store and check out the Minwax line.

https://www.minwax.com/wood-products/stains-color-guide/

These are designed around small batch projects, and for ease of use as well.

If we presume decent White Oak sanded to somewhere in the 600 to 800 grit range, then you are probably wanting to use Golden Oak as a stain.
As a top coat you need a clear finish

https://www.minwax.com/wood-products/clear-protective-finishes/

(Wipe-on poly is probably your best friend for this--simple and easy.)

For furniture, full gloss is often used, but a semi-gloss is often better.  The semi in the wipe-on is called "satin" in the minwax line.

Now, if you really want to get neck-deep in fine furniture/casework finish, that's some deep water.  There's an entire ocean of lacquer finishes, and most of those take years to learn well.  Some of the shellac finishes are similar.

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by Sgt.HoundDog on Monday, April 23, 2018 7:26 PM

CapnMac82

If you are in the States, probably the easiest thing is to go down to the home store and check out the Minwax line.

https://www.minwax.com/wood-products/stains-color-guide/

These are designed around small batch projects, and for ease of use as well.

If we presume decent White Oak sanded to somewhere in the 600 to 800 grit range, then you are probably wanting to use Golden Oak as a stain.
As a top coat you need a clear finish

https://www.minwax.com/wood-products/clear-protective-finishes/

(Wipe-on poly is probably your best friend for this--simple and easy.)

For furniture, full gloss is often used, but a semi-gloss is often better.  The semi in the wipe-on is called "satin" in the minwax line.

Now, if you really want to get neck-deep in fine furniture/casework finish, that's some deep water.  There's an entire ocean of lacquer finishes, and most of those take years to learn well.  Some of the shellac finishes are similar.

 

 

Yup that's what I was looking for, thank you very much!!

First model in 10 years! I'm happy with it!

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