SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

How simulate snow on dioramas?

6536 views
21 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    November, 2005
How simulate snow on dioramas?
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, August 17, 2003 4:52 PM
Hello!
I would like have some tricks for making snow on dioramas.

Thanks
Happyhunter
  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Niagara Falls NY
Posted by Butz on Sunday, August 17, 2003 5:05 PM
Hey Happy,
You could use baking soda to represent snow. You could also try your local hobby shop because I know theres an aftermarket company that does "snow".
Right at the moment I want to say Verlinden but I know its not!!. It'll come to me.
To apply the the snow you could do one of two methods. One spray a coat of gloss or flat then as you go along lay down the snow.
The other way is to use white glue(Elmers glue) mixed w/ water. Same thing as you go along apply the snow.
Once the snow has glued to the base, shack it to see if any access snow comes off then reapply as necessary.
I am sure this in amoung many ways to apply snow to a dio.
Flaps up, Mike

  If you would listen to everybody about the inaccuracies, most of the kits on your shelf would not have been built Too Close For Guns, Switching To Finger

  • Member since
    May, 2003
  • From: USA, GA
Posted by erush on Sunday, August 17, 2003 7:28 PM
Woodland Scenics is who Butz was thinking of I believe.

http://www.woodlandscenics.com/

go to their landscaping link, then ground cover.

Eric
Hi, I'm Eric and I'm a Modelholic too. I think I have PE poisioning.     "Friendly fire...isn't"
  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Niagara Falls NY
Posted by Butz on Sunday, August 17, 2003 7:48 PM
Hey erush,
Woodland Scenics.... thats it. I knew I would remember itTongue [:P]Tongue [:P].
Wasn't there another company that did "snow" which came in a small to medium size clear bag that had a greenish cardboard like material that was stapled at the top w/ the name in white I believe? or could that be Verlinden? As you could tell, I have not checked my supplies for my bases in a whileSad [:(]Tongue [:P]
Flaps up, Mike

  If you would listen to everybody about the inaccuracies, most of the kits on your shelf would not have been built Too Close For Guns, Switching To Finger

  • Member since
    May, 2003
  • From: USA, GA
Posted by erush on Sunday, August 17, 2003 9:28 PM
Hey Butz Big Smile [:D]

I think you're right, again I'm thinking it's Hudson & Allan Studio you're thinking of again. I know they make mud and dirt and leaves and stuff so they probably make snow too. Actually I think they have white cardboard on their packaging Tongue [:P] Anyway Happyhunter there are a few options out there. I'm pretty sure Verlinden doesn't sell any materials like that though.

ERic
Hi, I'm Eric and I'm a Modelholic too. I think I have PE poisioning.     "Friendly fire...isn't"
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, August 17, 2003 10:23 PM
Mix elmers type (white) glue with some water to a milky consistency.

Apply glue to object with a stiff brush (works best for me)

Sprinkle BABY POWDER over object.

Send a tuft of air over object to remove excess (you may need to cover eyes) :P


its easy. heck try it on a piece of cardboard!

good luck, have fun,

  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, August 17, 2003 11:18 PM
You can also use Talc powder to. The good stuff, like used for casting pewter figures.
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, August 18, 2003 3:21 PM
Hey! Big Smile [:D]

Thank you everybody for all tips! Wink [;)]

Happyhunter

  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 21, 2003 1:19 PM
What I used to use-

Plaster of Paris, sprinkled through a sieve, then gently misted with a water bottle. Worked great.

To make craters, use old bottle caps, turned upside down, and dusted with the Plaster of Paris, until suitably covered.
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: Sunny Florida
Posted by renarts on Thursday, August 21, 2003 10:20 PM
Baking powder works great. Just don't get it wet after the fact. Talc works great or ground gypsum. There have been a few comments recently that baking powder may yellow after a while or dependent on environment. I haven't seen this yet. What I have seen after an extended period of time though is that it seems to go flat and not have that fluffy look like it has after it is just applied. This may be a result of air humidity. But who knows. I live in Florida so it is a constant problem here. Talc or gypsum is a good substitute and may not have the same adverse effects. Long ago I used to just paint a good coat of white over the celuclay which seemed pretty aestheticly pleasing so I think it comes to preference.

Mike
Mike "Imagination is the dye that colors our lives" Marcus Aurellius A good friend will come and bail you out of jail...but, a true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn...that was fun!"
  • Member since
    January, 2003
  • From: United Kingdom
Posted by scotty on Monday, August 25, 2003 5:34 AM
You could also use Artex (finishing material for walls, a bit like plaster), dunno what its called over your way, I've used it on a couple of dio's and it looks good, even cracks like snow and ice.
  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by gar26 on Monday, August 25, 2003 1:32 PM
I recently did a diorama of a winter scene and I used baby powder and it worked great. Plus it's probably the cheapest way also
gpebernat
  • Member since
    November, 2015
Posted by STOVK on Friday, October 20, 2017 7:53 PM

I recall watching a behind-the-scenes documentary for "The Empire Strikes Back" and Dennis Muren said they used Corn Starch for snow in the Hoth scenes.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, October 22, 2017 9:50 AM

But they only had a short lifespan in days.

Theres much in that story that's retry fun, including little pop up holes to move the models in stop action.

Zombie thread too but never out of timliness.

  • Member since
    February, 2012
Posted by Liegghio on Sunday, October 22, 2017 9:43 PM

I've never made big billowy snowbanks in dioramas, only small scattered snowdrifts but I found that cornstarch looks realistic. It has a very fine scale texture and a slightly transparent surface that makes it look like it is actually frozen water crystals.

  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by MrStecks on Monday, October 23, 2017 1:26 PM

Disclaimer:  I have never built a diorama, and really know nothing about the subject.  But, I do spend a lot of time watching youtube videos about modeling, and a couple weeks ago came across this one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNVUHeUR0Fo

I just enjoyed watching it and thought the snow effect on the vehicle was amazing, so I thought I'd share the link.   Smile

Cheers, Mark


On the bench: Eduard 1/32 P-47 Dottie Mae

In the queue: Eduard 1/48 F6F-3 Weekend Edition;  Tamiya 1/32 P-51 Mustang;  Eduard F2 190A-9 ProfiPACK Edition;  WNW 1/32 Fokker D.VII (Fok.) "Early";  Revell 1/48 B-25J;  AMT 1/48 Lockheed Vega;  AMT 1/48 Stinson Reliant SR-9;  Revell 1/48 TBF Avenger;  Hasegawa 1/48 Nakajima E8N1 Type 95 Reconnaissance Seaplane (DAVE) Model 1

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Monday, October 23, 2017 2:07 PM

Mark, thats what i have started useing for snow and its brilliant stuff. Only used the fine, but going to do a 35th dio next year and will be useing the larger grade.

I am sure if Karl Logan sees this he will jump in with why its not a good idea to use food stuffs for snow. If i remember right, over time, it can damage the plastic on a model. But he knows more about it than me, all i know is i moved away from that method.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

  

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/32nd Fw 190D-9    

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Meridian, ID
Posted by modelcrazy on Monday, October 23, 2017 2:21 PM

Yes zombie thread but thanks Mark.

I'll look into Krycell, great looking stuff.

ON THE BENCH

1/25 Monogram 57 Chevy Bel Air
1/144 Trumpeter Kawanishi H6K5-L Mavis

Completing a kit is like cutting the head off a Hydra. Two more replace it in the stash.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, October 23, 2017 2:37 PM

Karls experience is that it turns yellow. I've exoerienced that with baking soda.

My own caution is that it'll attract vermin.

 

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Monday, October 23, 2017 6:03 PM

I've used microballoons in the past

 

  • Member since
    June, 2004
  • From: East Stroudsburg, PA
Posted by TigerII on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 2:03 PM

I'm with you Keavdog, I use microballoons or Woodland Scenics snow. 

They don't fade or turn yellow with time.

Achtung Panzer! Colonel General Heinz Guderian
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 10:39 PM

Yep - that figure is from 2007 or so

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

SUBSCRIBER-ONLY CONTENT
FREE NEWSLETTER