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Painting F-14 Exhaust

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  • Member since
    November 2020
Painting F-14 Exhaust
Posted by NewModelerMike on Monday, November 23, 2020 3:05 PM

I am a relative newbie and I probably bit off more than I can chew with my first real model build.

I am working on the Tamiya1/48 F14 A and have been trying to get a good look for the exhaust.

I started with a base of Mr Finishing Surface Black. That was followed by a layer of Ak Extreme Metal Stainless Steel. On the nozzles I then added model Master Titanium buffing.

From here I am stuck. I've seen various makers do the the light blue highlights but I am not being successful with this at all.

Is there anything I am missing? Any advice or tips to advance the look?

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Between LA and OC, SoCal
Posted by oortiz10 on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 12:32 PM

Hey NMM, welcome to the hobby! Nice to "meet" you.

If I'm correct, I'm guessing you're talking about the blue dicoloration caused by heating? I did a little heat discoloring on my F-16 using my airbrush and making very light passes with very thin(ned) Tamiya Clear Blue. Sorry, but I don't remember the ration. I sprayed it a low pressure and slowly built up the color.

I think that's the look you're going for, right?

Hopefully this helped a little. Feel free to ask any questions, and I'll see if I can help.

Cheers!

-O

-It's Omar, but they call me "O".

  • Member since
    November 2020
Posted by NewModelerMike on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 12:41 PM

O - 

Thanks for the reply. This is exactly what I am talking about. Now if I remember correctly the discoloration should go around the circumfrance right?

I think the mix I was going to try was 2:1 thinner/blue. Would that work?

And thanks for the welcome.

Michael

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Between LA and OC, SoCal
Posted by oortiz10 on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 2:25 PM

Hey Michael,

I'm not an expert on...well...anything, actually, but especially the F-14. I don't know if the discoloration goes all the way around. I bet if you Google F-14 exhausts you'll be able to find some good reference pictures. Just try to copy what you see in the pictures. Don't beat yourself up if you don't nail it the first time. I've been modeling a long time, and it still takes me several attempts to get things right. Even the simple things! 

As far as the ratio goes, I would start with something "thinner" and practice. Shoot some spare sprue or even a plastic utensil. Try different ratios. Remember, it's better to start thin and build up. If memory serves me, my ratio was probably thinner than 5:1. That just gave me more margin for error. I could slowly spray and monitor the color's density more easily that way. 

Good luck! I hear the Tamiya Tomcat is a great kit. Maybe Santa will bring me one. Anyway, be sure to post your pictures. I'd love to see the finished product.

Cheers!

-O

-It's Omar, but they call me "O".

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 3:02 PM

Alclad makes a transparent blue that works really well for exhausts, and you don't have to worry about the correct paint/thinner ratio.  You just dust it on, straight out of the bottle.  

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Between LA and OC, SoCal
Posted by oortiz10 on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 3:43 PM

Eaglecash867
 

Alclad makes a transparent blue that works really well for exhausts, and you don't have to worry about the correct paint/thinner ratio.  You just dust it on, straight out of the bottle.  

Hey! Good to know! Alclad is my go-to stuff for NMF. I'll have to check out their transparent stuff. Thanks Michael for your original post, Eaglecash 867 taught me something. 

Cheers!

-O

-It's Omar, but they call me "O".

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 3:59 PM

I've used Tamiya clear smoke/orange/blue to achieve heat staining on other applications like motorcycles.   I'll have to check the Alclad stuff as well as I am a big fan. 

Thanks,

John

Ain't no reason to hang my head, I could wake up in the mornin' dead 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 4:49 PM

Glad I could help a little bit.  They also have Transparent Yellow and Hot Metal Sepia.  Used a combo of those on the engine for my F-16.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 7:00 AM

I use alclad products for tailpipes and exhausts.  I stsrt with a base color representing the unburned taipipe material.  Alclad has a burned metal color that I put on with a very, very thin blotchy coating.  Then I put on even thinner blotches of transparent blue and red (any of several brands).  I sometimes put these on drybrush if I want thinner blotches than my airbrush can do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August 2015
  • From: the redlands Fl
Posted by crown r n7 on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 7:18 AM

I use tamiya gloss clear and work with oil paints then when desired effect is reached I'll seal it with tamiya clear flat.

 .Nick

  • Member since
    April 2010
Posted by Theuns on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 7:32 AM

On my F4 I used a basecoat of stainless steel metal master and then used oi paints to give some tonal difference between the pannels and the "feathers" on the cans

Then I used a graphite artist pencle to go over it and this gives a really nice metal look

 

Basically the same on my f15 but not quite as dark.

 

Theuns

  • Member since
    November 2020
Posted by NewModelerMike on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 9:10 AM

My progress so far. Comments are more than welcome. I won't get any better without feedback

 

  • Member since
    April 2010
Posted by Theuns on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 9:44 AM

You could do a pinwash with water colour paints highly thinned that will make the recceced detail pop

 

Theuns

  • Member since
    November 2020
Posted by NewModelerMike on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 10:03 AM

Theuns

You could do a pinwash with water colour paints highly thinned that will make the recceced detail pop

 

Theuns

 

Not familiar with the technique - can you explain?

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 10:24 AM

Flory Wash is another water-based way to do a good wash.  For that, you just slop the stuff all over the part with a large brush, let dry for 20-30 minutes, and then wipe off the excess with a damp sponge.  Tried it for the first time a week or two ago, and I'll never go back to the old way of dabbing thinned paint into each and every engraved line and mopping it all up with what seemed like a whole box of q-tips later.  The stuff is amazing and makes quick work of a job I used to dread.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 10:25 AM

I was curious about the burned effect too, and I recently tried it on a pair of F-4 exhausts. here is one of them....

Many folks have mentioned Alcad. I used Alclad Hot Metal Sepia, Violet, and Blue for this test. Being my first time and as you can see, I got a bit heavy-handed and should have stopped adding thin layers before I thought it was enough!

Started with gloss black base, I don't recall if I used Alclad or Vallejo Metal colors for the metal base.

Again, I think I overdid it but it will probably be barely visible if at all after I hit is with some exhaust or soot spray later, but it was fun to do and IMO it looks better in person than in the photo.

 

-Greg

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 4:50 PM

Mike,

Speaking of the Tamiya F-14A, here's how my burner cans turned out.  I used Alclad Dark Aluminum and their Transparent Blue and Hot Metal Sepia paints.  The inside is flat black, which I dry-brushed with flat white.  Turned out OK for my first try at doing a burner can that way I guess. 

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 6:24 PM

First time trying this too.  I have no idea if this F16 nozzle is accurate.  MRP super silver then burnt iron and burnt blue added.  Soot inside is ABT 502 oils-industrial earth and black.  I had fun painting it so I'm calling that a win.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, November 26, 2020 7:31 AM

Greg

I was curious about the burned effect too, and I recently tried it on a pair of F-4 exhausts. here is one of them....

Many folks have mentioned Alcad. I used Alclad Hot Metal Sepia, Violet, and Blue for this test. Being my first time and as you can see, I got a bit heavy-handed and should have stopped adding thin layers before I thought it was enough!

Started with gloss black base, I don't recall if I used Alclad or Vallejo Metal colors for the metal base.

Again, I think I overdid it but it will probably be barely visible if at all after I hit is with some exhaust or soot spray later, but it was fun to do and IMO it looks better in person than in the photo.

 

 

Agreed that it is a bit too heavy, but beyond that it is great.  Good blending of colors.  Just a little less color, or a light overcoat of burned exhaust color and it would be perfect.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Thursday, November 26, 2020 9:01 AM

Thanks for commenting, Don.

I'm pleased that you like the effect, even though I went too heavy. Hope you're right about the soot or exhaust.

-Greg

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: North East of England
Posted by Hutch6390 on Thursday, November 26, 2020 12:21 PM

I like the colour graduation, it doesn't really look too heavily done to me - I think maybe some Tamiya smoke would be enough to adjust the tone?  This isn't something I've tried yet, myself, but when I do I'll be happy if it looks like yours.

Vell, Zaphod's just zis guy, you know?

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Thursday, November 26, 2020 1:32 PM

Thank you, Hutch. I think Tamiya smoke is a great idea. I have a jar and just don't reach for it often enough. Thanks.

-Greg

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, November 27, 2020 2:26 PM

here is an old Revell Allison turboprop engine (just repopped by Atlantis) that I recently completed, using the Alclad plus blue and red washes I mentioned above.  Blue wash was Tamiya Transparent Blue lacquer, red wash was Testors Red.  Airbrushed both washes with minimum flow rate I could get.  Took a couple of minutes of build up for the red and blue areas.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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