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PUTTY HELP!!!

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  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, March 20, 2003 11:06 PM
just rescribe them, its easeir and looks better
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Everett
Posted by markuz226 on Thursday, March 20, 2003 8:33 PM
I tried the acetone approach and it did well EXCEPT that it erased raised panel lines. i guess ill just try to rescribe the lines or try to replace them with stretched sprue. hmmm.... any suggestions? Is it ok to continue the raised lines with scribed segments? I think this would be easier to do but im not sure if that will tuirn out right.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, March 20, 2003 8:32 PM
markuz,
I use Cutex brand nail polish remover that is labeled as being acetone free. I have not had any problem with it damaging the styrene and it will disolve the putty fairly well. Just put some npr on a q-tip and start rubbing away at the dried putty. You'll go through quite a few q-tips, but it will take the putty off.
If you're concerned about the npr and the plastic, just try it out on a small section and see if it does any damage. Just don't *dunk* the part in the npr and let it sit there for several days.

I use laquer thinner to clean my brushes after using Mr. Surfacer.

Murray
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, March 20, 2003 3:07 PM
disolve spruces in lacquor thinner or liquid glue and apply and sand
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by senojrn on Thursday, March 20, 2003 2:13 PM
Don't know of how to remove dried putty, other than scraping with an Xacto blade and/or sanding....sorry.


When I fill gaps, I use the Testor's putty. It is not a very good putty, but gets the job done when used with a dab or three of Super Glue (and when you hold your tongue right.) The fact that it separates in the tube and dries too quickly in the tip of the tube is frustrating, but I stick a straight pin in the end and then, when ready to apply, use the straight pin to stir/agitate the putty inside (in an attempt to mix it), then squeeze it out, move it to where I need it with an Xacto blade--usually No. 11--and pat it down. Once I have the putty in there, I immediately "seal it" with a bead of Super Glue. I smooth the Super Glue (if needed) with a toothpick, then once dry, sand, prime, and refill as necessary. Lots of steps and can be frustrating at times, but it works for me.

  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Everett
Posted by markuz226 on Thursday, March 20, 2003 12:29 PM
Thnx for all the replies! Does anyone know any other 'chemicals' that can dissolve hardened putty without (or minimal) damage to the plastic?
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Panama City, Florida, Hurricane Alley
Posted by berny13 on Thursday, March 20, 2003 11:34 AM
Leave the masking tape on while sanding. It will protect the area and require less panel line repair.

Berny

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Tamiya F-4D Phantom II, 13th TFS, 66-8711, 1/32 scale.  F-4 Phantom Group Build. 

 

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Salina, Kansas USA
Posted by arnie on Thursday, March 20, 2003 10:23 AM
Be sure you don't try to fill a large gap with putty alone. Some kits have gaps at the wing roots that are large enough to fall into. Use thin strips of sheet plastic or even stretched sprue to fill most of the gap and then use putty or gap filling super glue to finish.

"There is a fine line between 'hobby' and 'mental illness'."---- Dave Barry

"Giggity"      -------------------------------------------------------------       Glenn Quagmire

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: plopped down in front of this computer.
Posted by eagle334 on Thursday, March 20, 2003 9:12 AM
You can use masking tape to block off areas where you don't want putty to go. Wing roots are tough. I use a broken tipped number 11 blade. Get off as much of the putty as you can and try and clean up the panel ines while the putty is still soft. The putty has what I believe to be a lacquer in it that melts the plastic some, thats how it bonds to the plastic.

I use straight lacquer thinner for cleaning Mr. Surfacer from my brushes.

Hope this helps.
Wayners Go Eagles! 334th Fighter Squadron Me and my F-4E <script language="javascript" src="http://www.airfighters.com/phgid_183.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Iowa- USA
Posted by toadwbg on Thursday, March 20, 2003 7:12 AM
Try using Elmers White glue for small gaps. It's easy to apply and whipe away.
"I love modeling- it keeps me in the cool, dark, and damp basement where I belong" Current Projects: 1/48th Hasegawa F-14D- 25% 1/48th Tamiya Spitfire- 25%
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by James Mark on Thursday, March 20, 2003 1:31 AM
How do you guys keep the putty where it supposed to go....I find the wing root really nasty to fill all the time!

Do you just stuff it in there and sand it off later?
I tried laying masking tape as a shield on either side of the wing root...then used a toothpick to jam it in the joint...left it built up by about 1 mm then peeled the tape while it was wet.....this left the area clean, but sanding later made a mess!

ANy tips on using puddy would be great. I use Squadron white but don't like it...I would like a putty that is a little more liquid and doesn't set so fast!

any ideas?

thanks

James
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Everett
Posted by markuz226 on Thursday, March 20, 2003 12:42 AM
umm... thnx.. that sure is comforting... lol.
  • Member since
    February 2016
Posted by eaglecentral on Thursday, March 20, 2003 12:32 AM
I found Squadron Green to be too powerful for me.....hard to sand, dries hard like a rock. Only way to get it off is to sand it or scrape it and hope you don't do too much damage. Rescribe any panel lines gently. Nail polish remover is acetone based and, yes, will damage plastic. Good luck on this one.
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Everett
Posted by markuz226 on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 10:55 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by tknight

Try using nail polish remover with a small tooth brush or Q tip for the putty.


Acetone? Will not that harm the plastic? Thanx for the immediate response.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada
Posted by tknight on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 9:45 PM
Try using nail polish remover with a small tooth brush or Q tip for the putty.
Can't help with the Mr. Surfacer problem, sory.
Regards, Tim
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Everett
PUTTY HELP!!!
Posted by markuz226 on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 9:21 PM
As I was "experimenting" with my squadron green putty, (see my other posted topic "Putty putty putty"), I accidentally puttied areas that aren't supposed to be. Is there anything I can do besides scrapping the whole model for my careless mistake? Also, how can I remove Gunze Sangyo Mr. Surfacer 500 on my brush? Your replies will be very highly appreciated!
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