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Aircraft Photography

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  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Friday, September 02, 2016 7:22 AM

Well, If nothing else, this shows how images are subjective and can be manipulated. As the imagemaker you can change contrast, color, brightness and so on to get the look that you desire. Even in film days methods were employed to change or enhance images. This is certainly a major factor in being a photographer.

If this image was going to publication or to a gallery print, the sky could also be blue or even clouds added for that matter. There is a gray line to be crossed between photography and art in this case.

Photography is the tool for capturing moments in time, Art is an expression, and the viewer has their own reality (for example being color blind). It also depends on your audience and what appeals to them.

I'm getting somewhat philisophical with all of this, but I think our discussion does demonstrate on a larger scale that there are a multitude of ways to appeal to "the eye of the beholder," and it only starts with the taking of the picture.

Fun disscussion, at least for me. LOL. Smile

Max

And we should get the two on the same page for viewing.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Friday, September 02, 2016 8:48 AM

Say Max, interesting topic indeed. Here is a new topic for you. What do you think about the new mirrorless cameras? Some say they will replace our behemoth DSLRs. 

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Friday, September 02, 2016 11:26 AM

Hmmm, mirrorless cameras. Just a different approach on viewing with basiclly the same size sensor. Most have not yet developed an extensive lens system to match Canon and Nikon DSLRs. Power consumption is one of the problems on mirrorless in that the sensor must be on for viewing. Mirrorless cameras will get better as technology moves forward and getting rid of mechanical devices is the trend. (Think about your cars heater controls, more/less, heat/cool with two knobs being replaced with a touch screen that you have to pull over to operate to avoid crashing--Hardly progress.)

I guess the bottom line for me is does it shoot better pictures? Answer--No. I think our real danger to our DSLRs today is the phone/computer/camera thing in our pocket. Some already meet the requirements for monitor viewing (low res) and are getting better with each generation. In a world where everyone is viewing everything on computer screens and the attitude is "good enough", the smartphone will fill the bill. We'll still be shooting our incredible hi-res pictures with no market or need. Not complaining, its just how progress works.

Later  Smile

Max 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Friday, September 02, 2016 11:35 AM

Max, well said. I think that you nailed it.

 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Friday, September 02, 2016 11:58 AM

Thanks Bakster, since I'm basicly unemployed as a photographer, I'm practicing a new writing career. LOL! Seriously, my wife retired from a teaching career which included teaching English, Journalism, and Photoshop. How could you get a better instructor? Meanwhile I hope everone can put up with my ramblings as you guys are fun to practice on. Also this is not the only Forum that has to put up with me! Thanks Guys!

Max

PS--my instructor will be analyzing the last three posts later today with a printout and a big mean red pen. No slack from her!  Indifferent

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Friday, September 02, 2016 6:17 PM

You are a lucky man, Max. I wish that I had an editor. Geeked

Here is one to kick off the weekend.  Taken at EAA.

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Saturday, September 03, 2016 7:41 AM

Here's the last one I've been saving on the desktop after partially digging through the archives. I'll search further soon. Again Nikon D7000, Nikkor 200-400 f4 lens which is also what I used on the P-51.

A little side line news; As I was typing another message at 7:03 am local time, about 30 minutes ago, I was flushed from the computer by a Kansas earthquake. All is well (I think) but what an exciting start for the day!  Surprise

Later,

Max

Update: Magnitude 5.6 at Pawnee OK. Felt over several states, biggest ever for me. Yikes!

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, September 03, 2016 9:57 AM

Max, nothing felt here in WI. At least not here where I live. I recently read an article that hurricanes may help trigger earthquakes. An interesting idea in light of the tropical storm out east. 

Cool Pic btw.

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Saturday, September 03, 2016 10:25 AM

An earthquake? In Kansas? My goodness, what a way to start a morning indeed.

BTW, this is a fun thread to follow.

A half-decent aircraft in flight shot is one thing I never really attempted, so I'm just happily following along and enjoying the pics and discussion. There have been some real nice ones posted.

-Greg

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, September 03, 2016 10:54 AM

Say Greg, great to hear from you. Get your morning coffee down yet? Mine is brewing.

Speaking of earthquakes, here is a little story.

A few years back I was in bed trying to sleep. It was one of those sleepless nights. My cat was leaning against my legs and she seemed quite content with her sleep. I was envious. All of a sudden her head jerked up and she was staring out the window. After a few seconds of that she jumped to her feet and tore out of bed like she was running for dear life. There I remain wondering what the heck was that all about. About ten seconds later my bed begins to shake. Uh oh. Yes, it was an earthquake. My tv and stand is swaying and I was just hoping the thing wouldn't come crashing down. Fortunately, it was a short lived earthquake. 

So there you go. Another case in the books of animals sensing quakes before they happen.

THE END

PS: My cat could have at least said, Run for it Steve! Instead, she left me to fend for myself. Nice!

 

  • Member since
    October, 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Saturday, September 03, 2016 12:27 PM

  • Member since
    March, 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Saturday, September 03, 2016 1:14 PM

I remember a time when I was in high school and experienced an earthquake.  I had just finished working outside all day and had fallen on my bed under the fan trying tocool off.  I felt the bed start to shake and was yelling at my little sister to leave me alone.  When she didin't respond, I got up and there was no sister shaking the bed, but the airforce I had hanging from my ceiling was swaying.  That was in Peoria, IL.  Earthquakes are weird things.  Adds a little excitement to the day.  Glad everything is ok. 

Here are a couple more pictures.

Both taken at the Rockfor Airfest 2015.  Nikon D5300, 55-200mm lens

Happy Saturday All!

John

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: The NYC.
Posted by Ish47guy on Saturday, September 03, 2016 10:44 PM

Earthquakes and airplanes aren’t normally associated with one another, but I digress...

 

October 2008, I was in Kandahar, Afghanistan when Pakistan experienced a 6.4 level earthquake.  I was on a 12-hour overnight shift, and was doing some computer work at an enclosed office/workstation inside the hanger.  It felt like someone took my chair and just moved from side to side, kind of like when a roller coaster starts moving when it leaves the station.  Dust and sand were shaken off the beams, just like in the movies.  It didn’t last for more than 3 seconds.  Given how close it was to Halloween and the fact it happened at 3 in the morning, I just brushed it off as the hijinks of the young army guys I was working with.  I didn’t know what really happened till the day shift guys arrived a few hours later and told us.  Turns out the epicenter was only 115 miles away.

 

C-32 that flew in Sec of State Condoleeza Rice and her group:

This was a very typical delivery mission.  Fly to a spot on the map, overfly and verify with the ground folks and to let the masses know to move the hell out of the way, and set down.  Note the collapsed buildings in the forground.

The relief effort was no joke, beleive me.  Even the worlds biggest airplane got into the act:

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, September 05, 2016 11:29 AM

Interesting earthquake stories.

-Greg

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Wednesday, September 07, 2016 12:39 PM

Here's just a fun one!  Big Smile

Max

And being a photographer, I like the guy in the foreground missing the shot!

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Thursday, September 08, 2016 7:25 AM

Here's a few from the AT-6 files. A small air show in Bartlesville Oklahoma a few years back. I had a good position, good lighting, big lens and lots of opportunities that day. A good shoot for sure.

Max

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Thursday, September 08, 2016 8:55 AM

This is fun going through these files. I doubt these AT-6s (oops, I see one's an SNJ) would have ever been seen again without this thread. Anyway, the last two. (I think).  Wink

Max

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Thursday, September 08, 2016 11:19 AM

wolfhammer1

I remember a time when I was in high school and experienced an earthquake.  I had just finished working outside all day and had fallen on my bed under the fan trying tocool off.  I felt the bed start to shake and was yelling at my little sister to leave me alone.  When she didin't respond, I got up and there was no sister shaking the bed, but the airforce I had hanging from my ceiling was swaying.  That was in Peoria, IL.  Earthquakes are weird things.  Adds a little excitement to the day.  Glad everything is ok. 

Here are a couple more pictures.

Both taken at the Rockfor Airfest 2015.  Nikon D5300, 55-200mm lens

Happy Saturday All!

John

 

Good timing on this one John! Mighty fast closing speed on these guys. Perfect.

Max

  • Member since
    March, 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Thursday, September 08, 2016 3:17 PM

All,  Wanted to share a picture that I was fortunate enough to find.  When I was growing up, I had a guitar teacher named Bill Barker.  He was a bombadier on a B-17 named "No Comment Needed" and spent time as a POW in Germany during WWII.  He passed away several years ago.  I got inspired one day, and went looking to see if I could find out anything about his plane, with the intention of building a model of it sometime.  I found the picture below.

I am not sure which on is Mr. Barker, but there is a great image of his nose art.  The website for the 381st bomb group had info on the plane also, and I was able to track down enough info that I could build a model when I get a chance.  Mr. Barker was an interesting gentleman, who had some great stories.  He also built hand made guitars, one of which I found out years later was used on an recording of a singer named Elvis on a song called "Love Me Tender" 

Here is a picture I discovered just today looking to verify the Elvis reference.

Max, you talk about pictures telling a stroy and that is what makes them special.  This is a story I was part of, and while I took neither of the pictures, I thought that it would be interesting to share them. 

John

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Friday, September 09, 2016 11:03 AM

Ikar01 posted a picture of a Bee Dee 5 under a C-5 wing a while back. The BD5 was a kit plane manufactured in Kansas in the 1970s . Many were built but a crash and a lawsuit caused the French manufacturer of the jet engine to stop supplying engines. Few are left flying due to the lack of an engine. A few were used by the military to simulate cruise missles and detection research. I photographed this one at an air show several years ago. The pilot was well over six feet and I was amazed that he could get in the BD5. My link to this craft is that in the 70s I ordered the sales brochure after seeing it in a flying magazine. 

Short story on an amazing aircraft!

Max

  • Member since
    October, 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Friday, September 09, 2016 9:29 PM

I took my shot in 1973 at a air show at Cleveland's Burke Lakefront Airport.  The Air Craft Commander granted his request to park under our wing for protection.  He brought it in a C-47.

I notice your aircraft has a Canadian emblem on its side, and Ilike the design on his helmet.

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Saturday, September 10, 2016 6:01 AM

I almost missed this AERO L-39 on its single pass but I did get a side shot. Cool aircraft that can be owned by civilians wanting a jet fighter/trainer.

Max

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Sunday, September 11, 2016 4:44 PM

One I really like. Check out how serious the Stearman pilot is on the final.

 

Max

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, September 11, 2016 5:26 PM

I like it. 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Tuesday, September 13, 2016 11:12 AM

And a nice Sunday ride. What is that plane?

Max

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Tuesday, September 13, 2016 9:34 PM

Looks like a slightly duded up Stearman to me.

John

To see build logs of my models, go here: http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.htm

  

  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Copley, Ohio
Posted by wayne baker on Wednesday, September 14, 2016 2:27 PM

 I may get so drunk, I have to crawl home. But dammit, I'll crawl like a Marine.

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by Keyda81 on Saturday, September 17, 2016 9:49 AM

Got some more shots of my favorite plane.  This particular plane is the one my 1/48 model represents.  I scoured the internet for pictures of her before doing the model.  I have a small time line from 2002 to 2016.  She was with the Tennesee air guard, looks like she was transferred to us either in 2008 or 2009.  This was the first time I've had a chance to catch her on film doing touch and go's. 

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Saturday, September 17, 2016 11:00 AM

Great Herc pics!

Man, what a great plane!!! It was my 2nd choice (after the A-10), back when I had dreams of joining the Air Force to fly. I remember my 1st experience with the C-130. We were stationed at Ft. Ord Cali (Dad was a Huey pilot)...we went out to Edwards AFB (IIRC) to take a MAC flight to Hawaii for vacation. As we walked out on the ramp, towards the awaiting C-130, I thought "WOW....that plane is so ugly, it's beautiful!". My brothers and I were the only kids on the flight, the crew gave us headsets to listen in....I don't remember what was being said...but the crew chief had to run up to the cockpit to remind the crew that whatever it was they were talking about was a bit too "colorful" for us kids! They took us up to the pit...I got to sit in the pilots seat and put hands on the yoke. This 8 year old kid was in control of this lumbering beast...what an experience!!!

 It was many years later, that I finally became a pilot...and some years after that, that I got back to it and earned my instrument, commercial, multi-engine ratings. No joy in finding work as a pilot. This was 2008, when the bottom dropped out. I couldn't even find any kind of work. Depressing...broke...I got back into building models, to keep my mind out of the negative...I'd say it saved me.

Anyway...my last flight was on Sept 25th 2009. It was a return trip for Manistee MI. We have a camp up there on the Manistee River (salmon fishing!!!). Camp is directly below the approach to 28. Here's a pic from that flight...

It was beautiful...nice and calm...above the clouds. As we appoached home, the scattered clouds got tighter and tighter. I was just about to call up for an instrument approach, but a hole openned up...just over 2 miles wide...yeah, that's it, just over 2 miles wide!Whistling I slowed way down, rolled over and dove down through the hole.

One month shy of 7 years since my last flight (at the controls), I got to fly again! I did some work for my old instructor, in exchange for some air time. We flew a Diamond Eclipse. New to me...and my first time with a stick (aside from a few minutes in a Stearman and T-6). The stick feels so much more natural that a yoke, and I must say...that is the way a plane is meant to be controlled!

My instructor snuck in this pic and sent it to me after I got home. I had no idea he even took a pic! He said that goofy grin was on my face from the time we took off until we landed...I hadn't realized that either!

 

...and...one more pic that I really like. This was on my 1st solo, after earning my commercial/multi-engine rating...

Was a 1963 Twin Comanche. It was great for "real world" training. Had to manually lower the gears a few times, had one flap get stuck in the full down position, had a main blowout on landing, even an engine failure....good times!!!

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Saturday, September 17, 2016 11:22 AM

Some more flying fun, I dug up while looking for others...

As I mentioned above...Dad was a Huey pilot. His last flight was in 1991, while in command of 5/9th AirCav at Schoffield Bks HI. As a surprise, I took Dad to "Thunder Over Michigan" airshow, and bought us a ride.

We had the gunners seat and flew with doors open, toes hanging over the edge!

It was great, and a little heartbreaking. Ya could see in Dads face(not so much in this pic though) that he very much missed "HIS seat".

 

My boss at the airport is a balloonist....

That is a very different flying experience. You feel no sense of motion. You are just standing there...then ground moves down away from you and moves slowly along beneath you....until you land...you definitely feel motion when the ground stops but you are still moving and the basket tips over and you go tumbling out, and you gotta scramble like a m0f0 to get weight back on it!!!

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