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Special Hobby Heinkel He115 B-1 COMPLETE

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  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Special Hobby Heinkel He115 B-1 COMPLETE
Posted by Aggieman on Friday, May 18, 2018 3:14 PM

Howdy!

Starting work on what should be the fifth entry in my Year of the Axis Build with a really neat looking seaplane, the Heinkel He115 B-1.  This warbird was noteworthy in its role against shipping in the North Atlantic along the convoy routes from the US/UK to Russia, and the particular aircraft that I am modeling reportedly was involved in the attack on PQ-17 in 1942 (a disastrous convoy for the Allies).

The kit is by Special Hobby in 1/48th scale.

I did not hesitate to pick this one up when I first saw it a few years back.  The box art was very appealing even though I was not that familiar with the 115.  

I have built a couple of Special Hobby kits in the past, and know full well the challenges that these can present.  These are not cookie-cutter kits.  They are certainly not Tamiyas, or even Monogram.  They typically do not include things like locator pins or any kind of attachment stubs for things like wings or, in this case, pontoon pylons.

Well, to be fair, there were tiny protrubances on each of the pylons, but no way would those have provided near the support necessary to keep the pontoons in place on this model, as it is quite large and likely will be pretty heavy, as models go.

I've had a construction plan in the back of my mind for this one since I first inspected the plastic several years ago.  Now I am embarking on it.  This entails reinforcing the wings with plastic tubing and the pylons with brass rod, and drilling many, many holes in otherwise perfectly good plastic.

So to this point in the build I have managed to get all those holes drilled and cut out lengths of both plastic tubing and brass rod.  I also have taken an unusual build approach by attaching the lower wing parts to the fuselage parts sans any other work being done in the fuselage and without the upper wing parts.  This is to accomodate structural support work that I expect to have to do to keep the wings in place.

Here are all the pylons with the brass rod inserted.

I've done a lot of test-fitting of pylons and pontoons, nothing glued into place yet.

Here are a couple of shots of what I envision for the wing support plastic rod.

That's it for now.  Not a drop of primer or paint yet.  Nothing done with the interior.  Really just trying to get the engineering done of reinforcing these pylons and wings.

This probably won't be a traditional WIP with lots of photos of things that we see on builds every day.  I'm not detailing anything within the cockpit or fuselage, as the greenhouse will be closed up and prevent any of that kind of extra work from being visible.  This may also turn into a slow build for me, given that temperatures have reached into the 90s this week and it is just too dad-gummed hot to be in the workshop for too many hours.

Finally, I'm researching the hairspray method for painting the white camo on this bird.  The white was field applied and subject to pretty heavy wear and tear, so should not look factory fresh.  I'm going to attempt to capture that look.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Friday, May 18, 2018 3:40 PM

Nice, never seen this kit before, i thought the Matchbox and Revell 72nd ones were the only kits of the subject. Looking forward to seeing more. Interesting idea for the wing supports, i have been trying to think of somthing for my SH Me 264.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Phantom FG.1

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Friday, May 18, 2018 3:47 PM

I built that 264, no photos of what I did but I did install some plastic tubing to support those long wings.  That one had even less molded support for the wings, as in none at all, whereas the 115 has a couple of buttresses that don't act in a support capacity but provide for proper alignment.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Friday, May 18, 2018 4:31 PM

I had noticed there was little to hold the wings, and with wings that long it needs somthing. Thanks for the tip, i will have to remember that one.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Phantom FG.1

  • Member since
    April, 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Friday, May 18, 2018 4:35 PM

Looking forward to this one.  I literally just got the Swedish version of this kit in the mail today. Same kit but comes with Swedish, Norwegian Navy, and Finish markings. It’s a big impressive kit for sure!

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/48 GWH Fw 189 A-1 Nachtjager

On deck: 1/48 Bronco IF-17

In the hole: Who knows!  

  • Member since
    November, 2004
Posted by snapdragonxxx on Saturday, May 19, 2018 5:49 PM

What would you guys think to a 1/32 kit if this?

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Saturday, May 19, 2018 6:06 PM

snapdragonxxx

What would you guys think to a 1/32 kit if this?

 

I'd go for it, as long as its injection molded.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Phantom FG.1

  • Member since
    April, 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Saturday, May 19, 2018 9:04 PM

I’d buy one, escpecially if it was a Revell of Germany offering.  Although, I’d have nowhere to put it once it was assembled!

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/48 GWH Fw 189 A-1 Nachtjager

On deck: 1/48 Bronco IF-17

In the hole: Who knows!  

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • From: Streetsboro, Ohio
Posted by Toshi on Monday, May 21, 2018 8:46 AM

You sir, are a inspireration and are in my top ten number one modelers of all time as far as I’m concerned.  Thank you for posting and keep up the fantastic work!

Your friend, Toshi

On The Bench: Revell 1/48 B-25 Mitchell

 

Married to the most caring, loving, understanding, and beautiful wife in the world.  Mrs. Toshi

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Monday, May 21, 2018 10:51 AM

Toshi

You sir, are a inspireration and are in my top ten number one modelers of all time as far as I’m concerned.  Thank you for posting and keep up the fantastic work!

Your friend, Toshi

 

Top 10?  Wow, I'm honored.  Smile

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Monday, May 21, 2018 11:03 AM

I've made a small amount of progress.  I've installed the internal wing support rods and began attaching the upper wing part on each side of the aircraft.  Test fitting showed quite clearly that there is not enough support, even with my rods, to keep the upper curvature of the wing in place along the wing root.  Special Hobby provides a little lip that sticks out about 2-3 mm, not enough to keep it in place.  But I determined that by attaching the wing from the outer edge in, I'd be able to force it to stay where it needs to be.

To that end, I have glued both wing tops at the outer curved edge.

I have also begun installing the interior structural pieces - sidewalls, a bulkhead and the cockpit floor.  There will be another portion of the floor, above what would have been the torpedo/bomb bay on some of these 115s.  Taking my time getting to that part.  I have installed the other sidewall since I took this photo.

As I said in my initial post, I have had experience building kits like this, from Special Hobby and Classic Airframes.  I know what I'm getting into with this build.  In the next set of photographs, you'll see another area that is going to cause a problem, potentially. I had noticed it right away when I was inspecting the parts, but left it alone at the time. Now I'm going to have to start dealing with it.

Based on the shape of the canopy covering the rear gunner's station, and the box illustrations, I believe the shaping of the area indicated by the lightning bolt graphic is correct in the first photo, the aircraft's port side.  The starboard side is squared off. I'll need to look at photos of the actual 115 to determine which is correct rather than going by what I see in this kit or its box top.  If the port side is indeed correct, then I will need to fashion an angled part like that out of sheet styrene, not a difficult process, but getting it into place to match the exterior curvature of the fuselage does seem problematic.  If the starboard side is correct, then I'll simply cut away the angled part on the port side.

I had intended to pose the gunner station's canopy in the closed position, given that I saw some reviews indicating the clear part is too thick to display open.  Not sure now how I will display that canopy.

  • Member since
    April, 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Monday, May 21, 2018 7:52 PM

Well shoot.  The momentum to build mine is slowly ebbing.  Truthfully, I don’t think I have a Special Hobby kit in my stash that isn’t going to have some kind of issue like that to deal with.  Looks like you’re on the right track though.

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/48 GWH Fw 189 A-1 Nachtjager

On deck: 1/48 Bronco IF-17

In the hole: Who knows!  

  • Member since
    February, 2006
  • From: Cincinnati Ohio
Posted by DantheMan85 on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 9:17 AM

Off to a great start on the He 115, don't see to many kits about this aircraft. 

On my Work Bench: Academy 1/48 F-15E Eagle.

Up Coming: ?

           

 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Thursday, May 24, 2018 3:40 PM

I've managed quite a lot of work the last few days finishing out the interior.  There is a lot of detail crammed in there, and there are more than a few complaints as well.  Namely, the lack of positive connection points for many of the parts.  Also, instructions that are not always real clear as to where something should go.

Here are shots of the starboard side of the fuselage showing off the RLM 02 (gray) with some Flory black wash in there to give it some depth.  Much of this will likely be quite invisible once everything is closed up.

Port side photos.

This final photo shows the bombardier/forward gunner's mat.  I'm convinced with the lack of positioning guides in this kit that if I attempt to put it in before closing up the fuselage, I'll inevitably put it in mis-aligned to the point that closing the nose up will either be overly difficult or even impossible.  I test fitted everything by closing up the fuselage and determining that I can slide this part in through the nose opening, and the alignment will be more or less accurate.

I believe that I've already said that I don't consider this to be a cookie-cutter kit.  On the Revell difficulty scale I'd probably put this one at a 4 (of 5).  The fit can be maddening.  The lack of placement points for things like the rudder pedals is irritating, especially when you see that they did put in a crude placement point for the control stick.  Very inconsistent, but then, it is a limited run kit.  As such, it's not bad at all; I've built far worse than this one.

Next up is to close up the fuselage.  All of the test fitting I've done indicates that this may be an act of frustration, but I've always been able to test fit it together correctly despite how the parts don't want to meet properly.  

 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Saturday, May 26, 2018 11:10 AM

So yesterday I was able to get the fuselage halves mated together.  I started slowly, attaching the rudder only and allowing that to dry over a few hours.  Then I moved on incrementally over the next couple of hours.  Despite all of that, the lack of locator pins still hosed me, with a couple of areas that were clearly mis-aligned.  But I figured a bit of surgery would fix that up by either scraping away some plastic or shoring up with some strip styrene.

Today I got back out to the bench and inspected everything.  The Heinkel was looking good.  I scraped away all the seams then puttied everything with a good layer of Perfect Plastic Putty.  Still looking good.  

Now I decided was as good a time as any to attach the stabilizers.  These parts are among the worst I have ever seen.  They actually have decent sized attachment prongs, but they do not fit into the slot in the fuselage.  I had to scrape and sand away a bunch of plastic to get them to even consider sliding into the slot.  And then, I'm wondering if the person who carved the molds for these parts was inebriated, as there is no way whatsoever to ever get the parts to mount flush against the fuselage.

I had some resistance in getting the first of the stabilizers attached, and exerted just a bit more pressure than normal to get it into place.  Then ... SNAP!

There went the starboard wing.  Broke completely off.  The upper half of the forward fuselage also came apart (this is the area where the clear mis-alignment exists). And the instrument panel dropped out.

So now I am recalling the scenes in The Avengers when Captain America says to Hulk ... "SMASH" ... then Hulk and Thor standing there and Hulk punches Thor right off the screen, followed a little bit later when Hulk encounters Loki and proceeds to smash him on the floor repeately like a rag doll.  I am seriously considering the HULK SMASH treatment for this dog of a kit.  But I stepped away for a few minutes and considered that I really do like this warbird, and I really do want to build it in this scale, and I really don't want to smash an $80 kit.

After all of that reasoning, I set back to fixing everything up.  First I reset the fuselage joints, then put the stablizers on.  Those little [censored] fought me tooth and nail even now, but I got them into place.  The wing was actually easy to re-attach given all the tubing that I had in place there.

No photos of all of this, but I am now stepping away from the bench for the remainder of the day while this turkey sits out there and dries.  Hopefully much stronger than previously.

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Far Northern CA
Posted by mrmike on Saturday, May 26, 2018 1:36 PM

Ouch! No wonder the brand is called Special Hobby, LOL. Your decision to press on is admirable. I have a couple limited run kits on the Shelf of Doom for similar issues - at some point I just ran out of patience and motivation.

That's a very interesting aircraft, but I think I'll wait for one of the mainstream makers to kit it. Looking forward to your next installment!

Mike

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Wednesday, May 30, 2018 8:54 PM

Four days later, and I feel like I am making progress again.  I managed to get both stabilizers and the port wing re-attached without incident, but the forward upper fuselage fought a determined battle against all known solvents.  First I used CA, followed by several hours curing time with clamps applied.  When I removed the clamps, SNAP!  Then I used Tamiya liquid cement with a similar drying time under the clamps, followed again by another SNAP!  By this time I was beginning to wonder if Thanos is lurking in my workshop with his Infinity Gauntlet.  I dug through some hidden away modeling supplies my wife brought me from a friend of her's who's husband had given up his hobby due to his age, and voila!  I found a tube of Testor's cement.  I was amazed that the old tube was still in good shape, and it oozed right out of the nozzle.  So I put some of that in place, and again, out came the clamps and several hours of waiting time.

When I finally returned to my workbench, I took a deep breath and ... nothing.  The old glue did the job.  Of course, the area looked bad, but that's nothing that a little scraping and sanding won't be able to fix right up.

This kit is a putty monster, as the following set of photos show.  I had putty in the normal areas, along gaps in the fuselage, along the wing and stabilizer joints, and even along the leading/trailing edges of the wings.  The only area I left without putty was along the underside of the fuselage where there are a pair of bomb-bay doors (the 115 was capable of carrying a torpedo against enemy shipping).

Here is one of the leading wing edges.  It also shows another area of frustration for this kit, the landing light.  Note how the upper and lower halves are so misaligned even though the wing itself is aligned just fine.

Here is the area that put up such a prolonged battle against all of my glues.

One final photo - the huge greenhouse fully masked with the Montex Masks I bought for this kit.  I've been using these mask sets for a few builds now, and cannot recommend them more.  Even though not all of these masks fit exactly.  Many do but some are clearly wrongly cut, or perhaps it's the plastic that is somehow incorrect in its placement of the non-glass areas.

I'll likely augment the masks with some additional masking that I'll cut out.  The curved nose piece is particularly troubling, even though the masks for that part come with little cuts in the masking material that should have allowed those masks to lay down properly around all those curves.

Next up is the engines.  The engines are resin that look to be well detailed, although the instructions do indicate a need for added push rods.  I'll be scrounging my materials box for something to do those rods with.  Once I get the engines fully detailed and painted, I will install them into the cowling pieces, expecting that there will be more gaps requiring filler.  There are some PE pieces to affix to the floats, and then I will be moving on to primer and painting.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Saturday, June 02, 2018 9:40 PM

Today's update - two completed engines and a beginning to "glass" installation.

I spent the last couple of days with the engines.  These are resin jobs that came with the kit (there are no plastic engines included in this kit).  The detail is pretty good but does not include push rods.  No bother, I simply scoured my supplies drawer and found some fine gauge wire.  Thirty-six tedious cuts later, I had the push rods ready for installation.  Here is where I think I made my one and only mistake on the engines - I installed the push rods at that time.

I should have painted the engines prior to installing the push rods, as not doing so made it very nearly impossible to get a paint brush into the tight areas that I really needed to get to.  Oh well, live and learn.  As they are, I think the engines look pretty good, and for the most part are not going to be real visible once the props are in place.

While working on the engines, I put down a coat of RLM 02 gray on the masked "glass" to represent the interior of the framing.

Here are the engines after push rod installation but prior to painting:

After painting and weathering (photos show me that I need to come back to the weathering, clean up what I've done and start over, re, the black squigglys on the gear case is not what I was going for):

Temporarily installed into their cowlings (which themselves need some putty work):

I finished my work tonight by beginning to put into place the "glass" on much of the nose.  Some of these pieces don't fit worth a flip.  

This is a slow building kit.  Too many distractions and stumbling blocks, and way too much heat here in SE Texas, but I'm nevertheless plugging ahead with a vision of what this bird will hopefully turn out looking like.  

  • Member since
    April, 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Sunday, June 03, 2018 6:14 PM

Yeah, it got up to 101 hear in Dallas yesterday.  The engines and canopy glass look good.  Sounds like this one deserves a little extra time and patience but I'm certain it'll look great when finished. Whoop! Yes

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/48 GWH Fw 189 A-1 Nachtjager

On deck: 1/48 Bronco IF-17

In the hole: Who knows!  

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Sunday, June 03, 2018 6:26 PM

Mopar Madness

Yeah, it got up to 101 hear in Dallas yesterday.  

 

This summer is beginning to remind me of the Summer of 1980 when we went for more than a month with > 100 temperatures and no rain.

  • Member since
    April, 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Sunday, June 03, 2018 7:16 PM

Aggieman

 

 
Mopar Madness

Yeah, it got up to 101 hear in Dallas yesterday.  

 

 

 

This summer is beginning to remind me of the Summer of 1980 when we went for more than a month with > 100 temperatures and no rain.

 

 

Yes, and the heat went well in to October!  

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/48 GWH Fw 189 A-1 Nachtjager

On deck: 1/48 Bronco IF-17

In the hole: Who knows!  

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Tuesday, June 05, 2018 11:00 AM

I've made some progress but don't have any additional pictures to post.

There are rails along both sides of the floats that I presume were used for people on shore to grab for helping to maneuver this big bird into a berth, or perhaps for a downed airman to grab hold of while in the water?  Special Hobby provides a fret of PE that includes this detail.  Well, given how well this kit is going together, I was not surprised when the PE parts would not conform to the surface of the floats.  There were gaps where there should not be, and the parts were so tiny that no amount of influence that I put on them would either (a) get them to conform or (b) leave them where they needed to be or (c) leave them in an upright position rather than laying flat on the float.

My first effort was ghastly in this regard.  I think my CA is nearing its expiration date, so it was taking on a rather globby appearance.  I tried using the CA to fill the gaps, but that only worsened the look.  So I stewed over it for the better part of an afternoon, then decided to rip them off.  After that, I scraped away all the globbed CA and sanded it mostly smooth (although I believe it reasonable to see a bit of wear and tear on this part of the -115, so there is some scuffing still visible from my failed effort to attach these PE parts).

So that left me with a dilemma.  I needed to include those parts but the PE parts are junk.  I did some research on other people who have managed to get this one together, and found one guy had used fine gauge wire for these rails.  Off I went to my spares drawer, found wire, stripped it and cut it to length.  I had to drill pilot holes for the attachment points (using a pin vise drill, well, I had a bit of an accident and managed to drill a hole in the palm of my left hand, and let me tell you, that hurt and it was pretty bloody).  Even after all of this, I still have some issues - the wires are not exactly straight and there are a few bends that I could not straighten.  I think that with paint these wires will virtually disappear, so I'm good with what I've done to this point.

Next up - I puttied all the gaps along the "glass" (and there were way, way too many), then put down a coat of white Stynlyrez primer.  I also attached a grab bar located on the underside of the fuselage beneath the stabilizers that was promptly lost during the primer application.  Grrr.  But no worry, more wire fixed that right up.

I'm now spending time thinking of the paint scheme for this warbird.  Luftwaffe airplanes are easily the most fascinating to paint, and also, the most difficult.  They do take some planning prior to opening any bottles of paint.  What order to paint it?  Lightest to darkest is generally the decision, but on this one, there will also be some areas that are yellow.  And the upper surface camouflage wraps around the wings' leading edges.  So the scheme will be traditional Luftwafe splinter, RLM 72 and RLM 73, with an underside of RLM 65.  The underside wing tips are yellow and there is a partial yellow band along the underside of the fuselage.  To top things off, this particular -115 had some field-applied camouflage added to the upper surface - white.  The white was hastily applied, and in the harsh environment from which the -115 operated, the white faded badly and scuffed away, showing RLM 72/73 beneath.  I plan to use the hairspray method to replicate this look.

I plan to fully paint and weather this big model, including painting insignia and squadron codes, prior to attaching the floats and other fragile parts.  I am likely at the half-way mark with this thing. 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Thursday, June 07, 2018 9:33 AM

We have some paint -- and some more problems. Confused

Yesterday I put all of the Montex Masks in place for the insignia, 6 Balkenkruezs and 2 swastikas.  I started with the exterior shape on all of these and put down a coat of white paint, then began the painstaking process of applying all the various masks that comprise these shapes.  These all have white outlines around them rather than being full-on black, so there was a lot of tedious application work.  It was not until I got all the masking over the already painted white areas and painted the black areas that I noticed the minor problem I was facing with these masks - they were not cut right and simply do not cover all of the area properly.  Arggggggh.  

I've been using these masks now for a few builds and have been raving about them. Who would not favor painted-on insignias over decals?  More realistic and far easier to weather.  But like I said, this was a minor problem, in that all I needed to do was cut out some strips of Tamiya tape to cover over the problematic areas.  

After all of that, I put down the underside color, RLM 65.  I did some weathering with the paint, in that I applied at low pressure and covered panel by panel in a rather splotchy method, rather than painting in one smooth stroke as one might normally do with an airbrush.  This has given the underside a worn appearance, which I think is expected given the harsh environment from which this warbird typically operated (North Sea and Norway). I allowed it to set over night.  Went back out to the bench this morning and masked for the yellow wing tips and the fuselage band (that covers only the underside curve extending between the bottom of each Balkenkreuz insignia).

Now I swear, Scout's honor, that the only thing I have drank this morning was a glass of Carnation Instant Breakfast.  No alcohol (I don't typically drink that stuff anyway).  The photos suggest otherwise. Beer  It is clear that I did not get my masking aligned in a straight line.  I have some packing paper that came in a big Chewy.com box that I have saved for the purpose, cutting it into sections and wrapping it around large areas such as these wings and affixing with tape on the other side.  I certainly thought I had it on along the panel line, but unless the photo of the starboard wing is skewed due to the angle at which I took the photo, that masking is horribly wrong.  I'll have to get back out there to investigate and remediate the issue with additional painting.

Which brings me to the next, more troublemsome, issue.  When I lifted the masking from the fuselage band, the RLM 65 paint lifted clear off, exposing bare plastic.  I did put down a coat of primer across this entire model.  I've never had a problem with the Stynylrez primer, but then again, I don't typically use the white primer.  It looks like I still have a pretty visible seam in the area as well, so this looks like an opportunity to fix more than just the paint.  I anticipate that I'll fix the seam and sand the area where the paint lifted, then put down another coat of primer before putting down the RLM 65.

Anyway, here are the photos I've taken of this most recent work.

  • Member since
    April, 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Thursday, June 07, 2018 9:28 PM

Well, it is a good time to fix the seam but I sure know how it feels to pull up paint like that! Crying

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/48 GWH Fw 189 A-1 Nachtjager

On deck: 1/48 Bronco IF-17

In the hole: Who knows!  

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, June 08, 2018 12:37 AM

Coming along nicely.  I know the frustrations of lifting masks.  To me it's usually one of the most satisfying moments, so when things go wrong it's really irritating.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Friday, June 08, 2018 2:27 AM

Despite the kit issues, your doing a great job on this, the interiour is very nice. SH kits can be hit and miss, there 72nd Stuka was really nice to build, no frustration at all, but i am sure you'll do a great job on this one.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Phantom FG.1

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • From: Streetsboro, Ohio
Posted by Toshi on Friday, June 08, 2018 5:52 AM

And that’s what makes you one of the top ten modelers here on this Forums sir!

Your friend, Toshi

On The Bench: Revell 1/48 B-25 Mitchell

 

Married to the most caring, loving, understanding, and beautiful wife in the world.  Mrs. Toshi

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Friday, June 08, 2018 8:58 AM

I admire your patience and with your fortitude this model will have a stellar outcome I'm sure.

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm finally retired. Now time I got, money I don't.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Friday, June 08, 2018 5:55 PM

It's getting closer.  Today I spent several hours in the blistering heat of SE Texas working at one time on a bicycle and then on the 115.  The bicycle work was gratifying in that it was the first time since I cruised the not-so-mean streets of Lake Jackson, Texas as a junior high kid that I had to replace an inner tube (this time for my daughter's bicycle), without any issues.  Yay me.

When I turned my attention back to the 115, I found myself with a daunting task of masking for a standard Luftwaffe splinter scheme.  That process probably cost me a solid hour.  The first color for the top side is RLM 72, a dark green.  I followed the same procedure for applying this paint as I did on the underside, going for a splotchy appearance.  The darker color pretty much covers the pre-shading, not unexpectedly I suppose, but so far I like what I'm seeing.  I finished things up with a coat of Future to hopefully protect what I've done thus far when I start masking the RLM 72 to apply the next top side color, RLM 73.

Photos ...

Here is the completed underside showing my fixes from yesterday and the masking.

These next two pics show the leading edge of the wings on the underside, and how the top side paint wraps around the edge onto the underside.

Top side pics

Floats and engine nacelles

Hoping to get back to the bench tomorrow but with a swim meet early in the morning, in this heat, I'm not sure I'll be able to get much time out there.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Katy (Houston), TX
Posted by Aggieman on Sunday, June 10, 2018 6:17 PM

Light at the end of the tunnel.  Of course, I expect that the joke will be on me, as this is probably a lot closer to an Indiana Jones style of tunnel with bad guys around every corner and a missing link of track up ahead rather than a simple smooth ride to the end.  Oh well, I'll take whatever this kit throws at me.

Which has actually not been much in recent visits to the bench.  Problems have been of my own making, I think.

So last I left off, I had put down the first top side color, RLM 72.  Yesterday I set out to complete the top side painting by filling in the still-white primer areas with RLM 73.  Turned out mostly okay, but this morning I noticed a couple of places where I didn't get my masking completely aligned with the existing RLM 72 demarcation lines, leaving a narrow but very visible line of white primer.  Fixed that up this morning, then set to completing the overall paint scheme on this bird.

That was to apply some hastily painted on white, not in the typical Luftwaffe splinter pattern with the familiar geometric shapes and straight borders, but more like an Allied warbird with curves and meandering shapes.  Before I could do all of that, I had to research the hairspray method that I had zeroed in on as the best way to capture the look of the 115 as depicted on the boxtop art, with worn areas in the white, that was due to the harsh environment this aircraft operated from.

First I masked the areas to paint white with a whole lot of Silly Putty.

I next found a can of what appeared to be high-end hair spray that my wife had picked up somewhere.  Never seen her use it.  Not sure why anyone would want this in their hair but I digress. I opted to spray that stuff right from the can rather than decanting it to spray through my airbrush.  Sprayed it over all the white areas.  Then I let it sit for half an hour or so, so that the hairspray would dry completely.

Next came the paint, just Tamiya flat white.  I did everything I could to prevent overspray through the use of impromptu masks; I've already used a bunch of Tamiya tape on this build, and just didn't want to use any more if I could avoid it.  Having said that, I still ended up with overspray on areas where I didn't want the white.  That was a quick fix, although one of the photos shows some overspray that I missed.  I won't be touching that up, however, as I've since removed all the markings masks and it is not the most troubling thing to look at.

Once the white paint dried, I dug in my tool box for an old toothbrush, and after rubbing the white areas with some water, I set to rubbing those areas with the toothbrush. The theory is that the water will soften the dried hairspray, allowing you to scrape the hairspray (and paint covering it) away and leaving whatever you find beneath.  Well, it's not a theory, it's a proven concept.  This was my first use of this method, and while I likely overdid it, I think it looks pretty decent.  It does capture the worn look I was going for.

The last thing I did today was to remove all the Montex Masks for the markings.  I'm not real happy with their performance on this build, as I have already explained that they did not seem to be cut correctly to fit together. I don't know if the pictures really bear this out, but there are spots where you can see white where there should not be white on these Balkenkruez's.

Next up is decaling and weathering. After that, I must engineer a stronger mount for both nacelles.  So yeah, light at the end of the tunnel, but it's not going to be a smooth tunnel (especially when you see the big feature this thing is still missing - those floats!)

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