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Pre-Shading (Sharpie)

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  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Mooresville, NC
Pre-Shading (Sharpie)
Posted by piflo1 on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 9:48 AM

I just wanted to share my experience with ya'll.  I have read a lot about pre-shading with a Sharpie.  I decided to try it just to see what would happen.  It actually turned out pretty good except that I think I did a little to much paint for my top coat.  You can see in the pictures the suttle shading.

I used Acrylic for the sand color.  One thing that doesn't work for some reason is putting a dull coat on top.  I sprayed a Testors "Dull Cote" on top and the pre-shading came through like I had put the shading on after the sand color paint.  Very strange.

Anyway, just thought I would share...

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: South Central Wisconsin
Posted by Daywalker on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 9:53 AM
I've never heard of using a sharpie for pre-shading, but I like the effect!  We done, are the photos taken before or after the dull-coat 'cuz I don't think the shading looks over-done at all.  Looks just right by my eyes.

Frank 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2006
  • From: Tucson, AZ
Posted by Archangel Shooter on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 9:58 AM
Hummm- What's a Sharpie???

 Your image is loading...

 On the bench: So many hanger queens.

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Piscataway, NJ!
Posted by wing_nut on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 10:30 AM
A Sharpie is a permanent marker that comes in many colors and in tips from fine line to a broad chisel tip.  get 'em at Staples, Wal-mart... just about everywhere.   I have used this inide the cockpit around ribs and such with good results. Looks ike it works nicely for the panel lines too.

Marc  

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Mooresville, NC
Posted by piflo1 on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 10:34 AM

No, I didn't take pictures of the after effect of the dull coat.  It was really weird.  Can't figure out why it did that?  Any idea's?  Maybe an acrylic flat coat work? 

I was never really good at Airbrushing panel lines.  This experiment makes my think that I can do it with black paint and a brush too if I wanted...

  • Member since
    June, 2006
  • From: Westerville, Ohio
Posted by Air Master Modeler on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 2:44 PM

I disagree rather strongly with using a Sharpie pen for pre-shading, it will never look right. The problem with using a Sharpie pen is that the ink often burns through the paint if there isnt sufficient coats and leaves a stain under your paint job. Using a Sharpie pen alone for highlighting detail already painted black is fine but not as a preshade. Eventually the ink burns though forcing you to strip the paint and start over. Post shading using a wash over panel lines and a graphite powder rub is a better way to shade. The results are much more realistic.

Rand

30 years experience building plastic models.

WIP: Revell F-14B Tomcat, backdating to F-14A VF-32 1989 Gulf Of Sidra MiG-23 Killer "Gypsy 207".

  • Member since
    May, 2005
  • From: Left forever
Posted by Bgrigg on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 3:11 PM
I concur with Rand, Sharpies as a pre-shade invites trouble, especially with acrylics. OTOH I use Silver and Red Sharpies for highlighting IPs. I find the Black Sharpies comes across more purple than I like to see.

So long folks!

  • Member since
    February, 2006
  • From: Smithers, BC, Canada
Posted by ruddratt on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 5:05 PM
If you like the control you get using a sharpie, I have had success using soft pastels (not the oil ones) applied with a small brush, using either black, browns, or greys, to do my preshading. You get a much more feathered edge, still have the control you like, and they won't react adversely to subsequent overcoats like the sharpie can. Their one drawback is that it is best to apply them over a matt primer coat, so if you don't normally prime your models then you need to add an extra step, but that's it.

Mike

 "We have our own ammunition. It's filled with paint. When we fire it, it makes pretty pictures....scares the hell outta people."

 

  • Member since
    May, 2007
  • From: Seattle
Posted by PeeweeBiggs on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 5:31 PM

 Archangel Shooter wrote:
Hummm- What's a Sharpie???

 

It's what Baseball players use when they autograph a baseball card. It's what Bill Clinton was when he spoke to the Grand Jury...etc.

 

Peewee

Free worldwide shipping www.pacifictrading.hk
  • Member since
    October, 2004
  • From: Northern Virginia
Posted by ygmodeler4 on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 9:34 PM

Don't use sharpies and a dull coat.  I did this with my F-106

HEre's the result

of course that was after touching up a few spots with some pinkfill paintballs and a Tippmann 98 Custom hehehe

-Josiah

  • Member since
    June, 2006
  • From: Westerville, Ohio
Posted by Air Master Modeler on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 10:39 PM
 ygmodeler4 wrote:

Don't use sharpies and a dull coat.  I did this with my F-106

HEre's the result

of course that was after touching up a few spots with some pinkfill paintballs and a Tippmann 98 Custom hehehe

Yg! LTNS! I was wondering when you were going to chime in. I agree with you Again! Mischief [:-,] That Six is a poster boy for why you never use a sharpie pen to preshade and accent panel lines. Whistling [:-^] Hehehehe Evil [}:)]

OK, OK, OK, I did ruin an F-14 using two incompatable brands of clear finishes.Sign - Oops [#oops]  

LOL

 

Rand

30 years experience building plastic models.

WIP: Revell F-14B Tomcat, backdating to F-14A VF-32 1989 Gulf Of Sidra MiG-23 Killer "Gypsy 207".

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Wednesday, July 04, 2007 2:50 AM
I have used a sharpie for pre-shading with mixed results. It really depends on the paint you are using over it. I had ok results with enamals (used that twice, no burning what so ever) but not woth acrillics, the sharpie lines will run under the acrillic. 

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Wednesday, July 04, 2007 3:07 AM

Here are some pics of my Yoyager, pre shaded with a sharpie, painted with enamel.

Before painting 

first coat

third coat

  • Member since
    June, 2006
  • From: Westerville, Ohio
Posted by Air Master Modeler on Wednesday, July 04, 2007 8:56 AM
 RemcoGrob wrote:

Here are some pics of my Yoyager, pre shaded with a sharpie, painted with enamel.

Before painting 

first coat

third coat

Rob, Believe it or not the reason the Sharpie pen worked so well with enamel on your Voyager kit is because the ink is enamel (oil) base. Yup. sure as shoot! I learned this the hard way the first time I had experimented with a Sharpie pen I had to use nail polish remover to clean it off. Nothing else but enamel thinner, mineral spirits or nail polish remover will work. Under an acrylic base it will only burn through and ruin the paint job. Enamel base clear finishes over acrylics only make the burn through worse and switching to clear acrylic finishes will not help.

Live and Learn,

Air Master 

Rand

30 years experience building plastic models.

WIP: Revell F-14B Tomcat, backdating to F-14A VF-32 1989 Gulf Of Sidra MiG-23 Killer "Gypsy 207".

  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: A Spartan in the Wolverine State
Posted by rjkplasticmod on Wednesday, July 04, 2007 9:29 AM

I agree that using a Sharpie for pre-shading is a crap shoot.  I do use pens similar to Sharpies for post-painting detailing of major separation lines such as rudder/fin, wing/flaps, etc.  For that type os detailing, I use black pens from either Micron or Zig Millenium.  The inks in these are archival quality & true black without the purple hue that you sometimes get from a Sharpie.  They are available at most Art Supply Stores & are available in tip sizes from .005 to .05.  I find the .01 & .02 tips to be the most useful for my 1/48 scale a/c.  I have top coated these with both Acrylic & Enamel based flats with absolutely no problem.  Only downside is they are kinda expensive & they wear out quickly when used for modeling purposes.

Regards,  Rick

RICK At My Age, I've Seen It All, Done It All, But I Don't Remember It All...
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Baton Rouge, Snake Central
Posted by PatlaborUnit1 on Wednesday, July 04, 2007 9:36 AM

I have to agree with the sharpie ink bleeding through. I have a LOT of experience using sharpies on resin to mark where I see problems to fix later and no matter how much you try to cover it, the sharpie ink will "float" to the top with any solvent based coat.  This leaves a highly regular and very difficult to get rid of stain.  blue seems to be the worst offender of the sharpie world, with red next in line after that.

 I dont want to appear to knock your technique nor your post, but be advised that if you use anything other than an acrylic over the marker, it will dissolve the ink beneath it and the resulting  ink mess is frustrating to get rid of ( I remove all of mine by sanding prior to re-priming my figures).

 

David  

Build to please yourself, and don't worry about what others think! TI 4019 Jolly Roger Squadron, 501st Legion
  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Utereg
Posted by Borg R3-MC0 on Thursday, July 05, 2007 2:14 AM
 Air Master Modeler wrote:

Under an acrylic base it will only burn through and ruin the paint job. Enamel base clear finishes over acrylics only make the burn through worse and switching to clear acrylic finishes will not help.

I have two kits where I used a Sharpie under acrillic (tamiya) The shapie did seem to run runder the paint and I won't be using that combinations again (especially after the future coat) but I haven't seen it burn trough.

But this might stil happen over time....Disapprove [V]

 

  • Member since
    June, 2006
  • From: Westerville, Ohio
Posted by Air Master Modeler on Thursday, July 05, 2007 2:30 AM

I say burn because under a white primer coat that tested a Sharpie pen on it looked like it burned the paint. The color was a deep blackish purple. Other people refer to it as bleeding, running or floating through. Just the way I describe what it looks like to me. Like yourself I wont do it again.  

Rand

30 years experience building plastic models.

WIP: Revell F-14B Tomcat, backdating to F-14A VF-32 1989 Gulf Of Sidra MiG-23 Killer "Gypsy 207".

  • Member since
    October, 2004
  • From: Northern Virginia
Posted by ygmodeler4 on Thursday, July 05, 2007 1:24 PM
 Air Master Modeler wrote:
 ygmodeler4 wrote:

Yg! LTNS! I was wondering when you were going to chime in. I agree with you Again! Mischief [:-,] That Six is a poster boy for why you never use a sharpie pen to preshade and accent panel lines. Whistling [:-^] Hehehehe Evil [}:)]

OK, OK, OK, I did ruin an F-14 using two incompatable brands of clear finishes.Sign - Oops [#oops]  

LOL

 

yeah been pretty busy with lacrosse but i'm back for a couple weeks

-Josiah

  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, July 05, 2007 1:41 PM
 Air Master Modeler wrote:

I say burn because under a white primer coat that tested a Sharpie pen on it looked like it burned the paint. The color was a deep blackish purple. Other people refer to it as bleeding, running or floating through. Just the way I describe what it looks like to me. Like yourself I wont do it again.  

...I agree with all who advise against it...the ink and most paints don't gel well together...another problem is that black ink isn't really black at all; its a very dark indigo (purple) hue...and that purplish color seems to come out as the ink ages or is denatured by another chemical...those who use it are just asking for trouble, and it might not come for months or even years after the model is completed...

  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Misawa Japan
Posted by ilovef-4 on Friday, July 06, 2007 9:19 AM
Hey guys how are you? just to let you know i'm expermenting with a way to make panel lines stand out under primer. well post pics of results. the experment is using Gundam Markers (black) under enamel primer. let you guys know in a few mins. charlie
Kick the tires and light the fires. Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Misawa Japan
Posted by ilovef-4 on Friday, July 06, 2007 9:57 AM
ok here are the results, i got it as good as i could. let me know what you think. charlie Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket above here is before prime Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Kick the tires and light the fires. Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

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