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75th Anniversary of 1942 (World at War)

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  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Saturday, December 09, 2017 7:16 PM

Well done, Eric!  Looks really war-weary.  Exceptional work on the weathering!  Looking forward to seeing more!

 

Nulla Rosa Sine Spina

 

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Saturday, December 09, 2017 7:45 PM

 

 f4fair by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 cactus6 by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 lft-ft by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 

 

OK: Tamiya Wildcat has completed its tour with the Cactus AF. Guadalcanal was a miserable place to fight a war for man and machine. The island is almost exactly on the equator which means its very wet and very hot every day - you could get rained on and get hit with a dust cloud at nearly the same time. The field was dirt on top of Marston matting - not even proper revetments until pretty late and right next to the sea. So add salt air 24X7 into the mix. And let's remember that American industry was using cadmium for armor plate instead of paint pigment so its matte paints faded quickly. The island was under periodic air attack (two to five times a week) for three months. If you add in patrols, planes were in the air a lot, and many were flying craft that should have been at the airplane doctor. (Aircraft technology in WWII was very crude in our terms. So "reliable" is a completely relative term. American planes were all strong and reliable - for WWII fighters that were all "hot" and inherently dangerous aircraft. Think of aerial combat the way a Indy or Formula 1 driver would look at a race. Even if pilots were experienced enough to "feel" what the gauges were telling him, mechanical failure was extremely common. And men were flying over either the ocean or the jungle - either could inhale a pilot in a chute. A dicey proposition - but times were desperate and life cheap.) So if WWII planes were being worked too hard, it would have shown. And if you look at images of aircraft from the Pacific War, especially from the Solomons or New Guinea, they're a tired bunch, especially as the theater was very low on the allocation priority list for new aircraft - only China-India-Burma was lower.

 

Hope this explains the heavy hand at weathering needed for a South Pacific fighter. (I've got a New Guinea C-47 planned - it will be worse.) As noted earlier I have followed Doog's build log for a splendid Tamiya 1/32 Corsair. We've gone through black basing leaving a nicely mottled finish. Then came fading with oil dot filters. Last are panel lines, filters and pigments. Here I'm on my own. Doog used AK enamel products which are very good in my experience. But I want to see if I can get solvent free, so I decided to rely on Medea Com.Art paints, Flory washes and some pigments.

 

Word about the base. Space is a serious issue at my place so I won't be making dios for airplanes. I got a good deal this piece of plastic from Eduard done in a pattern that evokes the extremely useful US developed Marston matting (or pierced steel planking if you prefer) found in quickie airfields throughout the world after Pearl Harbor. Ultimately Guadalcanal hosted four strips - Fighter 1, Fighter 2, Bomber 1 and Bomber 2. As I recall B2 was given proper pavement, the others all Marston matting. (Fighter 1 was originally dirt.) The stuff rusted fast but on volcanic islands like Guadalcanal there was so much rain that the mat sunk into mud/dust (depending upon the hour.) I checked some pics of today's Henderson Field and the soil is reddish brown as I recalled soldiers saying was common throughout the Solomons - volcanic islands all. (The famous strip at Munda Point on New Georgia, which hosted elite Corsair squadrons, was a freak. It was rolled coral which made for a great field if you didn't mind operating out of a sand paper airstrip. If so you see some of the famous pics of highly chipped Marine Corsairs, they're from Munda Point. I saw no evidence of serious chipping from Cactus planes.) Anyway, the base is okay. I painted it bronze and gave it a healthy black wash with Com.Art and followed with pigments. On some fields the matting is very evident, some it's basically invisible, so we'll split the difference. (You can get resin PSP pieces but they're very expensive.) This will serve for a planned C-47, A-20, Corsair and P-38.

 

 base by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 basedet by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

I treated the underside of the Wildcat very differently than topside. I did the black basing but skipped the oils. I figured that fading would not have been a major factor below, but that dust and mud would have been worse. The reason should be obvious. I used the Flory Dark Dirt Wash for most of the effect.

 

 cactakoff by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 below by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 belodet by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

Iwata Medea Com.Art paints are hard to describe unless you've used them. They are a major brand in the world of professional airbrush artists for use on textiles, canvas and figures. They have a hydro-carbon binding agent that is very unlike the polymer found in Vallejo/Golden or the solvent brew found in Tamiya/Gunze. There are two weathering sets out there for railroaders, and that's where I ran into them. The texture is a little grainy and I think it would be much too fragile for base color on styrene. But each color has an opaque and transparent version - this allows a good artist to employ an equivalent of glazing. And it makes a great weathering paint. The grainy texture gives a kind of grime on the transparent versions. I use transparent black or transparent blue-gray smoke. You don't cover a whole area like you do with Flory washes. Instead paint the panel lines with it, let it dry, and wipe most of it off. I also find it ideal for creating a blotching surface - especially if trying to emulate exhaust or fuel/oil stains. Do note that - as advised by Doog - there is a lot of blotching and staining near the front. Radial engines burned a lot of oil especially when kicking out 1200 horsepower and receiving imperfect maintenance. Should also mention that Com.Art can be "revived" with water after it's dried, making it possible to tinker with the effects. (Adam Wilder is putting out a line of acrylic washes that can be "revived" - I think I know what they'll be like.)

 

I like Com.Art for panel lines a lot - they're less distinct than enamel or oil washes which is fine by me. I've been looking at airplanes via modelers' eyes for the past couple of years and I think panel lines are easy to over do. In some cases they're very evident. The bulkheads on the Grumman planes were heavy things and left very notable lines. But in many cases lines are indistinct but not invisible. So if I like a paint because you can't see it very well, there's method if not madness. I do supplement washes with Verithin color pencils which I can get very fine with an electric sharpener. Everyone will get different mileage but I like the combination of black basing (some lines you leave alone - they'll stand out) Com.Art washes and pencils better than pre/post shading and enamel panel line paints. Black basing etc is more irregular than more standard techniques. I'm not saying that it looks as neater, but I do think that it better evokes weathered aircraft where "distress" was irregular - nearly random. Anyway, after the Com.Art was done, I sealed the model with the really neat Windsor Newton Matte Varnish thinned with Mr. Levelling Thinner. (Vallejo's varnishes are good, but not that good, so I made that conession to water based modeling.) After I added a little more blotching done with oil color mixed with gloss for the odd fuel stain. Here are a couple of details:

 

 lft-ft-dt by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 rt-w-dt by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 geardet by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 

 

But not done. I made one serious blunder which had me close to madness. I am still looking for the perfect canopy. I have trouble with overspray if I mask the canopy and attach it (maybe temporarily) before painting and weathering the plane. So I do the cockpit individually and protect the cockpit and engine with tissue. I used Alclad acrylic Aqua Color for a dip. After curing I masked it and painted the frames the light-blue gray, cut with a little white. I took off the masking - things looked pretty good and I put them aside. Then I put them back on and attached them with Formula 560 Canopy Glue (made by the Zap people). A quick dry fit earlier had looked fine. But I wasn't really awake. You know how contemporary kits have separate clear parts for a closed and open canopy? Tamiya wasn't doing that in 1995 and the front part went on fine but the rear wouldn't set correctly. So I decided to leave it closed. But then the difference between the clean canopy frame and the highly weathered plane was pretty obvious, so I thought I'd get out Com.Art and apply it gingerly. Then I remembered I hadn't sealed the plane. Curse. Remove the canopy and seal the plane. Judging from the decals - which were fine but obviously not made last week - this kit was made several years ago. So I'm trying to look at the rear portion, thinking maybe I could still get it on in the open stance. And cracked the thing in two. Also, in the process of all of this handling, the Alclad was picking up stains. I know some swear by Aqua Color - it's possible mine is too old. In any case, the front was badly clouded. After panic settled down, I used Lysol to clean the part. That worked okay but there was still some cloud. So I dipped it in Pledge and that gave decent results. The Formula 560 was great stuff and although you can see the crack on the rear (but only if you look for it), it was no problem to put it on in the open stance. I used EZ Line for an aerial and damnation if it isn't really in scale. But I've been thinking about the Sunderland I owe Bish for the RAF GB for a couple of weeks and lived with the imperfections.

 

Below are pics of the plane.

 

Eric

  left by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

  rear! by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

  right! by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 rt-r by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 lft-r2 by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 rt-ft by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Sunday, December 10, 2017 12:55 AM

Great looking wildcat Eric, really nicely finished. Like the base as well.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Amusing Hobby 1/35th Lowe

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Australia
Posted by taxtp on Sunday, December 10, 2017 1:59 AM

Eric, I like the detailed approach to weathering, (and the rest of it) and really enjoy the level of information that you give.

I tink your Cactus Air Force Wildcat conveys the look that you intended, and it works well for me.

Cheers

Tony

I'm just taking it one GB at a time.

  • Member since
    April, 2006
  • From: ON, Canada
Posted by jgeratic on Sunday, December 10, 2017 11:55 AM

Hi Eric, excellent portrayal of the Wildcat.  Yes

Enjoyed the read, and yes, you definitely made good use of the tools and techniques to illustrate the conditions on Guadalcanal.

regards,

Jack

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Sunday, December 10, 2017 4:50 PM

Wonderful, Eric!  You've achieved a real veteran Wildcat.  Marvelous weathering effects.  The way everything is blended in gives a natural, organic look to the whole place.

Do you have a preference for the finished build photo?

Thanks for this contribution to the GB.

Nulla Rosa Sine Spina

 

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2014
  • From: Australia
Posted by lostagain on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 4:59 AM

Eric,
The wildcat looks fantastic! More weathering than I would dare on a plane BUT I have not looked at my subjects with you meticulous eye. The way your research brings the planes to life, evoking a tiny part of their harsh existence is great!
My own work is nothing near as meticulous, I am just trying stuff out. This time has been the whitewash and some muddying up with pigments. So did some pigment on the body, it’s a bit all one colour, and look a bit weird with the whitewashed wheels:
So other pigments were added to get a bit of variation and interest to the finish. Also had to blend pigments over the wheels and tracks to get a better result.
ANd a look at how the whole is coming together
So more work to be done, but I will assemble and review 'the vibe of the thing' to quote Dennis Denuto

  • Member since
    February, 2006
  • From: Cincinnati Ohio
Posted by DantheMan85 on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 2:14 PM

Thanks Bish: Yes I'd say the 1/18 scale would be a paint hog.

Thanks Tony: The Marseille figure looks great.

Thanks Checkmate: Cutting the edge off the Tamiya tape with a #11 blade makes for a nice sharp edge.

Andy: Great job on the insignia cross painting, they look sharp.

Thanks Lostagain: The Marder III is lookin' good, must have driven through some muddy terrain. Smile

Eric: Great work on the WildCat, a job well done.Yes

 

This Stuka is really becoming a paint hog, after masking up the bottom I airbrushed on Model Master Enamel RLM 70 #2080, it took two light coats. After letting it cure for a day I lighty sanded it with 2000 grit sandpaper dry, to give a nice and smooth surface for the Tamiya tape to adhere to. I found out on the bottom in some spots where the paint to a little rough, the Tamiya tape did not adhere totally. Then I washed the surface with soap and water.

 

 28 by Daniel Smith, on Flickr

 

Next up is Model Master Enamel RLM 71 #2081, was hoping the masking would not take as long but it ended up taking just over two and a half hours. On the edge of the tape to be painted I placed the tape on a piece of glass and cut the edge off with a #11 blade to make a sharp edge. The RLM 71 took three light coats to build up. After I had finished the third coat I removed the masking. This is the first time using the Model Master Enamel RLM 71 and 70, they dry to the touch pretty quick. After letting the RLM 71 dry over night I lightly sanded both the top and bottom with 2000 grit sand paper.

 

 29 by Daniel Smith, on Flickr

 30 by Daniel Smith, on Flickr

 

With the major airbrushing finished I started to attach the landing gear skids and propeller. As you can see the main skids do not sit flat. Embarrassed

 

 32 by Daniel Smith, on Flickr

 35 by Daniel Smith, on Flickr

 36 by Daniel Smith, on Flickr

 37 by Daniel Smith, on Flickr

Next up is final touch up's, then time to gloss and decals. Stick out tongue

 

 

On my Work Bench: Academy 1/48 F-15E Eagle.

Up Coming: ?

           

 

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 4:40 PM

Check:

I broke a rule - when I declare a kit finished, it's usually finished regardless of what's wrong. (If I pursued perfection, I'd still be working on my first kit - which was pretty bad.) But the aerial was just too out of scale regardless of what EZ line says. I replaced it with rigging line which is finer and has only a little stretch. It looks better. If possible, use this pic for the "complete" page at the front.

Heavy weather Marder looks v good.

Eric

 rt-ftGD! by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Australia
Posted by taxtp on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 6:13 PM

Your Marder looks really good Lostagain, I had to check that it was 1/48. I think your experiments with weathering have gone well on a pretty complex scheme.

Daniel, the splinter camo on your Stuka looks very sharp, I'm looking forward to the next update.

Cheers

Tony

I'm just taking it one GB at a time.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 6:50 PM

Great looking effect, lost.  You've really achieved a beaten-up appearance.  I've had cars that looked a lot like that.

Nulla Rosa Sine Spina

 

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 6:51 PM

Very good, Dan.  I've always like the splinter camouflage.  I can imagine it's really using up the paint!

Nulla Rosa Sine Spina

 

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 6:55 PM

I see what you mean, Eric.  New antenna looks much better.  I'll update the front page right away.

You've created quite a work of art.  Weathering and wear turned out beautifully.  

Thanks for being part of the GB.  Always a pleasure to see your work.

Nulla Rosa Sine Spina

 

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 4:08 AM

Nice job on the splinter Dan, i know what you mean about the paint.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Amusing Hobby 1/35th Lowe

  • Member since
    April, 2006
  • From: ON, Canada
Posted by jgeratic on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 1:17 PM

Eric, good idea to go with a thinner wire.  I think the fine size EZ line is good for cable wires of 1/48 scale, but not so much so for antenna wire diameter.

------------------------------------

Lost,  looking very good, and that added dirt over the white wash does pull things together.

------------------------------------

Dan, good job of applying that camou onto the Stuka.  Shame about those skies, it looks like they should have had some pivot to them to sit properly on the ground - maybe a take off diorama, but then you need some figures?

------------------------------------

I'm close to having the recon Spitfire done:

Here is the base coat of Hataka paints Royal Blue over a medium grey primer.  On the right is some lightened areas and gloss coat overall.

Decals, and further weathering.  Testors clear parts cement used to create a window surface over fuselage port side camera location.

The two underside cameras, I will have to redo.  They are too close to the openings and that caused problems when attempting to create clear film. 

regards,

Jack

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Australia
Posted by taxtp on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 5:32 PM

Wow Jack, what a great scheme. I wasn't aware of the Royal Blue overall one. I like building Spitfires, and I like to get a variety of schemes into my collection. I'm going to add it to my wants list.

Cheers

Tony

I'm just taking it one GB at a time.

  • Member since
    April, 2014
  • From: Australia
Posted by lostagain on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 7:23 PM

Dan,

The '87 is looking great, the splinters have come out very sharp. Pity about the angle of the skis.

Jack,

Very striking PR Spit there, like Tony I didn't know this one.

The Marder continues on, now the tracks, wheels, tools and other bits are on. Another go with pigments is required, mainly to dirty up the new additions that look way too pristine. Here the spare tracks stick out

Like wise with the muffler

and tone down some of the tools

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Meridian, ID
Posted by modelcrazy on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 8:30 PM

Looks great Lost Yes. The 38t is such a cool little chassis.

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/35 Hobby Boss Fieseler Storch
1/72 Hasegawa Nell
1/48 Tamiya Swordfish
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales

In Que

1/700 Tamiya King George V

 

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 10:14 PM

Fantastic finish, Jack.  Nice looking color!  Quite an unusual subject.  Haven't seen it before, so it's especially attention-grabbing.

Nulla Rosa Sine Spina

 

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 10:15 PM

Dan,

 

How hard to take the skiis off? From checking photos it appears they were field attachments and a little surgery would not look bad at all. The skiis in front should be parrallel with the skid in the rear and yours aren't so putting it in snow wouldn't help I"d say. It sure appears to me that the skiis had a pivot in them. This is from the 1/32 Trumpeter kit and you can see that when in level flight the skiis and the skid are not parallel - but when on land they are. There's got to be a work around there.

Eric

 02253彩页A by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 10:16 PM

More great work, lost.  It's very convincing.  You've got a nice touch for weathering.

Nulla Rosa Sine Spina

 

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 10:22 PM
Lost, I do like the Marder - considering what I did to the Panzer IV I'd have to. Hamilkar Barkas who has one of my favorite modeling channels on YouTube argues that the tools and boxes were all given base color paint. Now that paint would be faded and chipped like crazy, but if he's right they wouldn't look cool and offer visual relief from the base color. And from looking at a lot of pics, I'd say Hamilkar is right. So war is the enemy of art. And yea, something really nice and tidy would look like an add-on to your Marder. But looking good.

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    April, 2006
  • From: ON, Canada
Posted by jgeratic on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 11:08 PM

Lost, the Marder is really coming along, standout work on the rusted  mufler - and thanks about the PR Spitfire.

Also thank you Tony and Check.    Photo Recon Spitfire units were given quite a leeway for their aircraft finishes, and the dark Royal Blue was quite popular in the Mediterranean.  Since the colour was almost the same as that of the roundel, the blue portion  was painted lighter.  The linked photo is likely the same aircraft I'm building:

regards,
Jack

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Australia
Posted by taxtp on Thursday, December 14, 2017 4:52 AM
Thanks Jack, that's a good one. I went to the hobby shop today, no PR spitfires, not even an Airfix Mk XIX, but I did buy an Eduard Profipack Mk IXe, which is very nice. I'll get one on the 'net. There's great weathering detail on the nose of the aircraft, its a great photo. Thanks for sharing it.' Cheers Tony

I'm just taking it one GB at a time.

  • Member since
    April, 2006
  • From: ON, Canada
Posted by jgeratic on Thursday, December 14, 2017 10:36 AM

Tony, no problems there.  If you already have Spitfire kits in the stash, you can also look up Pavla brand.  They make some PR conversion sets that include resin, decals, and vacuum formed canopies.

https://www.scalemates.com/search.php?fkSECTION[]=All&q=spitfire+iv&fkCOMPNAME[]=%22Pavla%20Models%22

 

regards,

Jack

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Australia
Posted by taxtp on Thursday, December 14, 2017 7:03 PM

Thanks Jack. My local supplier has it in stock too :)

I'm just taking it one GB at a time.

  • Member since
    April, 2014
  • From: Australia
Posted by lostagain on Friday, December 15, 2017 1:28 AM

Okay, i think I'm done with the Marder. It was a fun little build and an opportunity to try out the hairspray technique and to do more weathering than I usually do.

 

I have noticed with these photos that the gun and shield are on a little wonky, and that I knocked over the radio aerial at some point in the shoot. I'll fix that up off screen.

Check, again thanks so much for hosting this GB again, great to be part of the production of so many memorable models, and to get a little better each time!

Got a couple of other GBs to finish off before I go back to 1941 (Defiant NF) then a couple more before I get to 1943 (an RAAF offering), so I will be back but don't hold your breath...

  • Member since
    April, 2006
  • From: ON, Canada
Posted by jgeratic on Friday, December 15, 2017 10:56 AM

Lost, fantastic job on that Marder. Yes

I like the white wash effect, but it's the dirt, mud and rust that stand out for me.

 

regards,

Jack

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Meridian, ID
Posted by modelcrazy on Friday, December 15, 2017 11:35 AM

Great job Lost Yes The dirt and mud on the running gear and hull look fantastic! The whitewash looks great as well.

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/35 Hobby Boss Fieseler Storch
1/72 Hasegawa Nell
1/48 Tamiya Swordfish
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales

In Que

1/700 Tamiya King George V

 

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Saturday, December 16, 2017 10:16 AM

Thanks for posting the photo of the PR Sptifire, Jack.  Always good to see the real thing, and it makes for a nice change from "PR Blue."

Great work, lost!  The wear and tear is realistic and convincing.  Looks like it put in a hard winter.  You achieved some terrific results!

Thanks for taking part!  I'll look forward to seeing your up-coming endeavors, whenever you get around to them.

You've got some good photos; do you have a preference for the front page?

Nulla Rosa Sine Spina

 

 

 

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