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75th Anniversary of 1943 (World at War)

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  • Member since
    September, 2016
  • From: Albany, New York
Posted by ManCityFan on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 9:21 PM

modelcrazy

Those look great Check. The water looks fantastic Yes

 

Ditto  I like the way your water effects came out.  Nice job on those little guys, they do add to the dio.  Very creative use of a small scale.  I like it!

Dwayne or Dman or just D.  All comments are welcome on my builds. 

  • Member since
    April, 2006
  • From: ON, Canada
Posted by jgeratic on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 10:08 PM

Check, absolutely wonderful work on those little boats, and the water convincingly conveys a feel of motion, and top speed at that! Yes

regards,

Jack

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 10:30 PM

Thanks very much, Steve, Dwayne and Jack.  I appreciate it very much, coming from such masters of the artform as yourselves.

I looked up internet photos of the real things underway, and tried to duplicate the wake patterns.

Even though the crew members were tiny, there still wasn't room to put a gunner in the guntubs and still fit in the .50's.  I was disappointed that didn't work out.

  

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  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 2:04 AM

Check, thats really well done. The boats looks great and the water effect looks spot on with the boats in place. Great little dio.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Revell 1/72nd Fw 200C-8

  • Member since
    August, 2015
  • From: the redlands Fl
Posted by crown r n7 on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 9:38 AM

CMK very well done ! (They we’re expendable) right out of that movie.

Nick.

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Griffin25 on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 10:02 AM

CMK great job on your dio. I had to find my glasses to see it! Haha. Very cool! 

 

 

Griffin

  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 11:41 AM

Check - I have to agree with everyone else, those little PT boats look awesome!

Nick - that's a nice start on that B-24!

I've managed to get a little more work done on my 190. First up I replaced the kit pitot tube with a length of brass. I'll add tip towards the end of the build....

 

Next up I got the whole thing primed and shot the RLM 04...

 

I was also able to get started on the marble coat of RLM 70. Looking forward to getting more paint on it soon!

 

 

 

 

 

-Andy

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 3:32 PM

Thanks very much, Bish, Nick, Griffin, Andy.  You are all too kind!

I haven't seen "They Were Expendable" for years.  I should have looked at it for motivation during construction.

Nice going with the FW, Andy.  Luftwaffe schemes are always colorful and attractive, I think.

  

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  • Member since
    October, 2009
  • From: Worcester, England.
Posted by aeroplanegripper on Saturday, June 30, 2018 10:09 AM

Hello everyone, apologies for the time its taken me to post anything on worthwhile note on the 1/72 Corsair, as work as always has got in the way of any plastic time. Really fantastic builds are being put together on this GB!

 

I have completed all the fuselage assembly, and also spent some time masking the birdcage canopy, cleaning up the kit and putting together the landing gear.

 

 

 

 

The kit has received today a final masking and a caat of Alclad Grey Primer, which Im going to let dry for a day before a finish with a very fine MicroMesh sheet. 

 

 

I have also given the prop a wash with light Flory Models Grey wash, and attached the Hamilton Standard decals. Tomorrow I will add the first coat of Alclad US Navy Light Grey to the underside and fuselage and vertical stabiliser.

 

 

Thanks for looking! 

Best Regards

Mark

"bis vivit qui bene vivit"

 

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Saturday, June 30, 2018 10:17 AM

Great progress, Mark.  Work does tend to interfere, I know.

Everything's looking good!

  

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  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Sunday, July 01, 2018 1:05 PM

I have been away for a while, Congrats Steve on the Bronze, it was well earned for EQ brings out the best.

Check, I didn't know you were working on 1/700 PT boats, and you say I'm a little daffy for some of the things I do in 1/700Big Smile

This GB is really moving along well.

Scott

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Sunday, July 01, 2018 8:07 PM

  I think anyone who works in 1/700 has to have some DNA for "daffy" at some point! Clown

 

  

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  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Sunday, July 01, 2018 9:02 PM

checkmateking02

  I think anyone who works in 1/700 has to have some DNA for "daffy" at some point! Clown

 

 

I resemble that Propeller

  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Tuesday, July 03, 2018 7:34 AM

I was able to get a lot of work done on my A-5 over the weekend. Got all the camo work done and just need to mask off and clean up the fuselage band and paint the top of the tail RLM 65. The RLM 70/71 are pretty close tone wise but you can see the difference better in person. All the camo work was done freehand with MRP paints.





Thanks for looking!


-Andy

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Tuesday, July 03, 2018 8:11 AM

That looks good, Andy.  Are the paints you used acrylic or enamel?

  

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  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Tuesday, July 03, 2018 1:22 PM

checkmateking02

That looks good, Andy.  Are the paints you used acrylic or enamel?

 

Thanks Check. MRP calls their paints an acrylic lacquer. They come prethinned for the airbrush and work really well. I still have to get used to how translucent they are when I'm covering the primer but it it allows for some really nice shading. 

-Andy

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Tuesday, July 03, 2018 2:10 PM

Looking really nice there Andy, good to see someone else useing MRP.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Revell 1/72nd Fw 200C-8

  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Tuesday, July 03, 2018 3:29 PM

Thanks Bish. Yeah I just started using them and so far I really like them

-Andy

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Tuesday, July 03, 2018 3:55 PM

Ye, me to, going to try them out on an armour build next.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Revell 1/72nd Fw 200C-8

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Wednesday, July 04, 2018 8:10 AM

Thanks for the information, Andy.  I'll check them out.  Lately I haven't been able to locate a lot of ModelMaster paints, so I've been gravitating toward Humbrol and Colourcoats.

  

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  • Member since
    October, 2009
  • From: Worcester, England.
Posted by aeroplanegripper on Thursday, July 05, 2018 10:01 AM

Excellent cammo work there Andy, and freehand as well! I have Eduards 1/72 little cousin of this, and your build has pushed me in the direction of my stash!

Well done,  I will keep watching.

Best Regards

Mark

"bis vivit qui bene vivit"

 

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Friday, July 06, 2018 2:18 AM

 

Sorry that events have kept me off the list. Good work as usual. Couple of comments on others work.

 

1. Good ship Steve, which means a good model. They do have a visual impact that's hard to match. I've kept some of your comments on a separate file for future use because I know I'll end up doing another one. I really like the idea of rigging components - never even thought about doing that, but it would solve some really ugly problems. You make a good case for a thick base - I'll think that one over. I couldn't really see a ship fitting into this GB or the Commwealth/RAF GB in the 43 range (I already did Scharnhorst at a modest level) - but next year, I've got the Tamiya 1/700 Bogue and the Trumpie 1/350 England.

 

I did like your Kirishima but I've still never heard a single reason why there isn't a good 1/350 USS Washington kit. BBs were, even in WWII, supposed to sink BBS which was almost never done. Washington did: she nailed Kirishima in a few salvos. And, no good models of a ship that performed in theory ultimate BB role. Of course there was no Enterprise until 2016- maybe because it sunk too many carriers. (Heavens, we have more Hoods than Washingtons.)We have buckets of Bismarcks because it sunk the Hood - but if you want a KGV that sunk Bismarck you have to make huge alterations to the Tamiya Prince of Wales kit. There isn't a good Rodney. And there's not Washington. And there's no Duke of York that ended Scharnhorsts career. Surigao Strait? You can get a 1/350 Fuso - but no US available Yamashiro. There are several modernized "old" US BBSs in 1/350 scale, but they do not include West Virginia, California or Tennesse - the three ships (especially West Virginia) that had a major role in sinking a IJN BB with surface gunfire. But you can get what is supposedly a poor USS New York that bombarded coastlines. No Washington. Amazing. It's like the ship community is more interested in ship types than in what they did in history's greatest wars.)

 

Another PT109. Good. In the late 90s I was interviewing a lot of USN vets for my South/SW Pacific stuff. Gents each type of duty gave very different reflections. (I think there was something to the saying I often heard: “smaller the ship, better the service.”) I did get some lucky connections into the PT Boat crewmen. I never interviewed anyone from the class of late 44 when the US had so many support ships that blue water fleets were able to carry their own PT recon force. The class of 1942-43 were different – closely connected to the relatively cramped waters of the “Slot” in the Solomons or the New Guinea Coast. There were few that thought the PT Boats had filled the role hoped for by their founders. (History is filled with the idea that small, cheap, fast ships could defeat or deter powerful vessels – which they haven't done so yet.) On DD guru Russell Crenshaw (highest recommendations on both of his Solomon campaign books – didn't hurt that he was gunnery officer on the USS Maury that played center stage of the first US “whoppin” of the IJN Dds in August 1943) claimed the PT Boats were not properly evaulated at the time because their proper USN officers (who doubted the entire concept) pointed to the very few PT victims relative to the large number of PT “supposed” attacks. Crenshaw doesn't validate the attacks, but reminds us that the “college boys” were using torpedoes that were seriously flawed and that had been central to a series of defeats suffered by the USN surface ships in the Solomons and the submarines across the Pacific until late 43. OK. But could the little boats do what they were supposed to do? Maybe not, especially in the Solomons. (The lesser known campaign of New Guinea was a very nasty affair. PT Boats in both theaters ended up seeking night time missions conducted by Japanese “Daihatsu” barges – figure 60-100 feet long, locally made, and carrying an infantry squad or two. That's why both started carrying canon because torpedoes were pointless. Some very ugly shoot-outs, all at night. Still needs a good book. Anyway, there was one subject that PT vets would not talk to outsiders about – PT 109. When “not talking” they talked a lot. Here's the picture from inside the PT Boat community, Solomon Islands. One picture was that when a boat went out off the coast of New Georgia (early August 43) it was sitting there with at least one engine at idle – if not both. Boat of the era did have crude radar and sound equipment. No other PT Boat of the period was cut in half by a IJN DD – it could only have happened if someone was “asleep at the switch” - something that young JFK was accused of being. In short, PT109 was a calamity and self-inflicted. The negative picture was more favored by USN regular officers trying to patch this incident into a very large campaign. Lower level officers and men were pro-JFK. They pointed out the “total black” of the South Pacific (something I heard described dozens of ties) and the ease with which that a boat on patrol (sitting static) could have been easily rammed by fast moving and very quiet IJN DD. They'd argue that were not regularly rammed, but it was something that happened in both fleets among surface fleets. If you wanted thumbs up with JFK, you looked at what he did. The son of the ultimate US Democratic elite won a medal. And injured himself so badly that he never slept without pain. Whether Kennedy as a boat commander had let his guard down or was simply unlucky matters little. The boat perished in what was still a fierce nightime struggle between the US and IJN forces. And Kennedy helped saved men from a ruined boat. That's usually considered heroism.

 



 



 



 



 



 

 

 

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Friday, July 06, 2018 4:11 AM

 

A report on my Kurk T-34. As a model, the kit is complete. However I do intend to build a base (those seem to be great fun – this one with static grass) so some of the delicate parts of the kit like grab handles aren't going on until the end. It's too plain to me now that the more work you do on a kit, the more you have worry about exterior parts that could be damaged or – in my clutzy hands – demolished.

 I've never done a good tank. Some have been ok. But it was interesting to try to follow the bouncing ball created by Adam Wilder – one of the best AFV modeler on earth. On YouTube there is a 26 part series (figure 300 minutes) of Wilder doing a KVI. I 'm doing a T34 so that's the same. Wilder's series begins with the end of construction and what he calls “modulation” painting. (The series was done in 2016 and I think you'll find techniques like “black/white” more current. I took it to be very similar to my favored “black basing” technique.) Anyway, the idea is to have the base model already carrying an irregular finish that will fit the beginning of weathering from the start. (I should note, that one very formidable guru Mike Rinaldi appears to now favor a uniform base in acrylics and all weathering done by oils – it might work.) Here is my rendition using my “go to” Golden High Flow acrylics:

 

 meld! by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 To a extent this exercise was a greatly altered “infomercial.” Wilder's skills are undoubted, but he also employed his own companies weathering materials. This includes filters, washes, earth effects – all are enamel based. Wilder oils are odd, but neat. They are matte and dry very quickly, but like the other companies he offers far too many colors. If a modeler can't figure basic color mixing, perhaps they shouldn't be using oils at all (much less pigments).

 

 I can't use enamel products – they horrible to smell and handle. I've used them in the past and know they work. But if I'm going to work on a tank for a long time I'm going to use acrylic. There are all kinds of variations on this – acrylic mediums that slow drying: Vallejo Acrylic washes: Wilder's new “Acro-line” which can all be used for streaking and below hull weathering. I add to the mix my well used Iwata Medea Com.Art acrylics. Now add to this my very large collection of Vallejo Model Color paints, there are about a million ways to weather a tank. But not the way Wilder does it.

 Wilder (and Mike Rinaldi) talk a lot about “layering” a model. I understand the idea as a poor water color fan years back. But what do you want to do with a model tank? Here's my take. Let's say you're got a T-34 reading for battle at Kursk in 1943. The tank itself has probably met its crew sometime in Febuary. After allocation to one of the Central Front Armies the unit would have been in almost constant movement or training until July 1943. Indeed, Hitler's delay of Citadel allowed both armies to equip and train for a month longer than any other summer campaign in the East.

 

So what does that mean on tank? I'd argue that heavy duty chipping would not be to the level you'd see in city/village/forrest fighting found in most other months of the campaign. You would, however, seen extreme levels of streaking: there was lots of rain, Russian and German tanks were not good with lubricants, but above all, there would have been buckets of dust and dirt – the kind of thing that made tank crews choke. This was the steppe and in July. So when it dawned on me that most of Wilder's subtle steps involved dust and streaking, I thought it worth the time.

 Here's a close-up of what I've done:

  reardet by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 right by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

  rt-notdone by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Friday, July 06, 2018 9:06 AM

Nice work on the tank, Eric.  I think you achieved your goal in terms of weathering, making it look more "well-used" than "battle-scarred."

Interesting read about the PT boats, too.    

  

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  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Friday, July 06, 2018 2:18 PM

Thanks Eric, your T-34 is nicely done. Interesting read on the PT boats. It's a shame they weren't more effective.

Not sure why the manufactures don't focus more on ships that actually did something rather than being sunk. The Missouri and her sisters are an exception to that rule. Other than hosting the surrender ceremony what did it do? Bombard and provide some AA support. I always thought they should have used one of the "Old Ladies" for the ceremony though I understand why they didn't. Trumpeter is producing some interesting subjects though.

EBergerud
I couldn't really see a ship fitting into this GB or the Commwealth/RAF GB in the 43 range

LOL, I'm always looking for a way to fit something nautical in a GB. Even a floatplane or carrier based AC.

  • Member since
    April, 2006
  • From: ON, Canada
Posted by jgeratic on Saturday, July 07, 2018 1:59 PM

Hi Check, hate to do this but would like to change up my entry.  There is suppose to be a publication coming out sometime (soon?) on Canadian Armour in Italy and I want to see what that has to say before committing to the Sherman.

------------------

So my replacement choice is AFV Club  Valentine MK.III in 1/35 scale:

THe kit already has a metal barrel incuded and a small fret of PE, but will add some aftermarket workable tracks from Bronco.  They should be easy as the links are single pieces that snap together.

The history of this captured vehicle is quite interesting.  It originally landed during Operation Torch with 17/21st Lancers, part of 26th Armoured Brigade.  It was abandoned during the fighting around Tebourba in late 1942, whereupon the Germans acquired it.  During the Kasserine Pass battles, it was used as the lead tank in a night attack on the British, where it was finally knocked out on the 24th of February 1943. 

The Bison motif was a symbol of the 7th Panzer Regiment of 10.Panzer Division - the latter marking can also faintly be seen to the left of the opened driver's visor in the form of an upright 'Y' and three vertical bars.

 

regards,

Jack

 

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Saturday, July 07, 2018 8:55 PM

No problem, Jack.  I've altered the build roster to reflect your new choice.

Very interesting history of this Valentine.

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2009
  • From: Worcester, England.
Posted by aeroplanegripper on Sunday, July 08, 2018 12:37 PM

Hello everyone,

I have completed the painting of the Tamiya 1/72 Birdcage Corsair, paints used were Alclad USN Intermediate Blue and USN Light Grey.

 Walkways were masked off and painted with Alclad Matt Black. 

 I then added a few coats of Alclad Aqua Gloss Varnish in preperation for the decals.

 Thats it for now, Ill try to get the decals some evening this week, but then its a fun weekend at Flying Legends 2018 at Duxford and then a weeks holiday to Tenerife to meet my newborn grandson.

Thanks for looking

Best Regards

Mark

"bis vivit qui bene vivit"

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Sunday, July 08, 2018 1:28 PM

Nice looking subject jack, i take it you won't be useing the trailer. Interesting piece of kit, at first i thought that was being pushed in front of the tank as some sort of mine clearer, then i realised it was a trailer being towed. Never seen that before.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Revell 1/72nd Fw 200C-8

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Sunday, July 08, 2018 1:31 PM

Great work there mark, nice job on the scheme. Wish i could make Duxford this weekend, you'l have to let us know how it went.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Revell 1/72nd Fw 200C-8

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