SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

The Race Into Space GB, October 2018 - July 2019

33807 views
1293 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, January 10, 2019 11:38 PM

Mach71>  I understand compromise on details, though it seems there are enough examples around for a model company to get at least close.  In the 1960s when my model was produced, not so much.  Still, I'm sure you'll produce something really impressive!

About the trip to Huntsville.  It has come down to needing to do up-close research because the internet just doesn't have the required images.  I'll do it in person.  At the moment, I'm trying to figure out how to take images of the top of the Saturn V that is lying on its side.  I need some sort of do-it-yourself selfie stick to raise my camera in the air to get the top.  Don't know what the employees at the Space Center will say about that!  Surprise

And I will take plenty of pictures.  If anyone needs something, let me know and I'll try to get some shots if they have an example of what you want.

And I didn't get anything done tonight as I fell asleep.  Up too late last night, and up too early this morning.  I'll leave you a photo of where things stand now.  The antenna are finished and ready to be attached.  I've dry-fit the Command Module with interior, and have decided to re-paint the interiors with a lighter grey.  Starting work on the engine bell nozzle.  The LM Storage Area is a bit out of round (ever so slightly), so I need to come up with a ring or metal striping that I can jam inside to keep it so.  The balsa wood bar is just temporary.  That's about it for tonight.

Gary

Today in Space History:

1969 January 10 - . 05:51 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. Launch Pad: LC1 or LC31. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Molniya 8K78M.

  • Venera 6 - . Payload: 2V (V-69) s/n 331. Mass: 1,128 kg (2,486 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: MOM. Program: Venera. Class: Venus. Type: Venus probe. Spacecraft Bus: 2MV. Spacecraft: Venera 2V (V-69). Decay Date: 1969-05-17 . USAF Sat Cat: 3648 . COSPAR: 1969-002A.
  • Venera 6 was launched towards Venus to obtain atmospheric data. When the atmosphere of Venus was approached, a capsule weighing 405 kg was jettisoned from the main spacecraft. This capsule contained scientific instruments. During descent towards the surface of Venus, a parachute opened to slow the rate of descent. For 51 min on May 17, 1969, while the capsule was suspended from the parachute, data from the Venusian atmosphere were returned. The spacecraft also carried a medallion bearing the coat of arms of the U.S.S.R. and a bas-relief of V.I. Lenin to the night side of Venus.

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, January 11, 2019 7:27 AM

Mach71: Ah ok, very cool! I'd just assumed you'd cut the metal strips yourself. 

Gary: Well instead of a selfie stick you could ask them if you can fly a small drone with a camera around the hanger... Stick out tongue

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Friday, January 11, 2019 9:10 AM

GAF
At the moment, I'm trying to figure out how to take images of the top of the Saturn V that is lying on its side.

Drone with camera.   LOL

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Friday, January 11, 2019 5:30 PM

Are you looking to take pics of the CSM or the LES?

Steve

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, January 11, 2019 11:22 PM

modelcrazy

Are you looking to take pics of the CSM or the LES?

I probably will, but there are nice images of these online as they are more interesting subjects than plain panels that have nothing going on about them.  Is there anything you're needing in the way of details?

Gary

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, January 12, 2019 6:13 PM

Not much to show, but some progress is made. Some of the office is installed and ready for paint.

The last several days I've been working on the wing roots. Unfortunately, my model had some large gaps. I tried sanding here and there, that helped to a point. The gaps were still too large for something like Perfect Plastic Putty. So, I tried going with spru-goo. That worked well. I have some minor air divots to fill but that should be an easy deal. Inevitably some panel lines are damaged in the sanding process. They will need to be repaired. 

So, I am still bringing things together for paint. Oh--and I happened on a wood base at Walmart that might work perfectly for this.

PS: The fuselage is not glued. I banded them together for photo sake.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Saturday, January 12, 2019 8:30 PM

Bakster, good job on the seams. Wing roots are my worst enemy.

Steve

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, January 13, 2019 12:08 AM

modelcrazy

Bakster, good job on the seams. Wing roots are my worst enemy.

 

Thanks, Steve. Yeah it's not easy with all the panel lines and such. And usually, it's a bad fit. It's work to fix.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, January 13, 2019 4:34 PM

There is a scene in The Right Stuff where Yeager rides up to the X-1 that is going through some kind of engine run through. The X-1 is connected to a large hose that runs to the back of a military truck. I am toying with modeling that scene, less the horse and Yeager. What I can't figure out is where that hose connects to. I checked the movie from all angles and the best I can come up with is that it connects near to the rear undercarriage. If anyone has any historic knowledge of this and where it might connect-- I'd be interested to know. 

Thanks..

 

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, January 13, 2019 6:53 PM

Bakster>  That's nice work on the X-1!  I understand about gaps.  Good thing the model hasn't been sitting in a box for 50 years!  Let me tell you...  Wink

As for the engine attachment, I don't know.  That scene has always mystified me, as the X-1 is just sitting out there alone... no one around.  I did find one photo of an engine test, but it is for the Bell X-1E, and the hose attached on the rear fuselage through a removed panel.  Not sure if the X-1 was the same.

https://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/Gallery/Photo/X-1E/Large/E-2392.jpg

Gary

Today in Space History:

1969 January 13 - .

  • Soyuz 4 scrub - . Nation: Russia. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 4, Soyuz 4/5, Soyuz 5. Spacecraft Bus: Soyuz. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-OK.

    The launch of the 13th Soviet cosmonaut into space aboard Soyuz 4 is scrubbed - the first launch scrub in the history of Soviet manned launch attempts. Despite -24 deg C temperatures and 8 to 10 m/s winds, the fuelling of the rocket proceeds successfully. Voice communications are lost with Shatalov whenever the television camera is turned on, but it is decided just to leave the camera off and proceed with the launch. Then at T - 9 minutes a problem is detected with the gyro platform of the rocket. It takes three hours to fix, pushing the launch back to 15:00, meaning the landing will have to be in darkness at the end of the mission. It is decided this is too risky, and the launch is cancelled. As Shatalov exits from the spacecraft, he jokes that he has set a new record: shortest space flight, and first to return to its exact point of lift-off. The engineers are concerned with the internal temperature of the SAS abort system solid rockets if left on the pad for 24 hours in these temperatures. The internal temperature of the fuel cannot go below -2 deg C at night. Any lower, the loss of specific impulse of the fuel would reduce the thrust by more than 5%, the limit established for safe operation.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, January 13, 2019 6:53 PM

Cool Bakster. I hope sanding wing roots, thankfully the wings aren't that big! I like the idea of the diorama with the truck, looking forward to more.

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Sunday, January 13, 2019 8:37 PM

Hi,

Sorry for "slow rolling" getting this build done.  I've been distracted b a couple things and also playing around with some different ideas.  Right now all I really have to do is finish up some touch ups on the paint and then add the windows and decals on the model, so I hope to finish that up soon.  For the base, I recently picked up some Testors washes, and have been playing around with them.  Its been a fun learning project for me, as this (and a small tank build that I am also doing right now) are my first forays into using washes.

Anyway, here is a quick sneak peak of how things are coming along.

PF

 

Sneak Peak

 

 

 

1st Group Build

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, January 13, 2019 8:42 PM

GAF
That's nice work on the X-1!  I understand about gaps.  Good thing the model hasn't been sitting in a box for 50 years!  Let me tell you... 

Why? Do tell.. Share your pain brother...

Hey, that is a nice find with the X1-E. That seems to confirm access through a panel. Unless more info presents itself, maybe I’ll do a major “guesstimate” using the general location shown in the movie. That will have to do. Thanks for what you found, it does help.

 

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, January 13, 2019 8:43 PM

Gamera

Cool Bakster. I hope sanding wing roots, thankfully the wings aren't that big! I like the idea of the diorama with the truck, looking forward to more.

 

Thanks Gam.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, January 13, 2019 8:44 PM

Hey PF, that looks cool!

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, January 14, 2019 11:23 AM

PFJN

Hi,

Sorry for "slow rolling" getting this build done.  I've been distracted b a couple things and also playing around with some different ideas.  Right now all I really have to do is finish up some touch ups on the paint and then add the windows and decals on the model, so I hope to finish that up soon.  For the base, I recently picked up some Testors washes, and have been playing around with them.  Its been a fun learning project for me, as this (and a small tank build that I am also doing right now) are my first forays into using washes.

PF

PFJN> Things certainly look good, PF!  The base and the astronaut figure certainly work nicely with the shuttle.  Look forward to seeing the finished product.  What sort of decals are you planning?

Gary

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, January 14, 2019 12:14 PM

PF: Looks pretty awesome to me! And you're moving way faster than I am... 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, January 14, 2019 12:15 PM

Bakster

 

 
Gamera

Cool Bakster. I hope sanding wing roots, thankfully the wings aren't that big! I like the idea of the diorama with the truck, looking forward to more.

 

 

 

Thanks Gam.

 

Grumble, I meant I hate sanding wing roots... Guess I shouldn't post with a YouTube video playing in the background... Sad

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Monday, January 14, 2019 1:05 PM

Gamera
Grumble, I meant I hate sanding wing roots... Guess I shouldn't post with a YouTube video playing in the background... 

Ha! I had to read your original post a few times before I figured it out. I am slow. No worries though, good exercise for the brain! 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Monday, January 14, 2019 3:08 PM

GAF

PFJN> Things certainly look good, PF!  The base and the astronaut figure certainly work nicely with the shuttle.  Look forward to seeing the finished product.  What sort of decals are you planning?

Gary

Hi,

I bought some decals off eBay that I hope to use.

1st Decals

Flags

Although they 1st set is 1/48th scale I think that they will look ok on my 1/60th build.  I intend to put the Red NASA logo on top of one wing and either a US Flag, or the NASA Globe symbol on top of the other wing, and a US Flag on the Fuselage (port and starboard) with the black UNITED STATES decal, aft of the flags. Smile

I may also add a RESCUE arrow or some of the other miscellaneous marking too, but haven't fully decided on which ones to use yet.

PF

1st Group Build

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, January 15, 2019 5:10 PM

PFJN> Those are great decals.  They'll look splendid on the shuttle.  The "rescue" decal would be a good idea, as I noticed on the image I linked for Bakster on the Bell X-1E it has a decal that says "Other Side - Rescue".  Big Smile

https://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/Gallery/Photo/X-1E/Large/E-2392.jpg

Project Report:

I've made some slight progress over the last weekend.  I was trying to find a way to round the lower base a bit for a better fit with the folding panels, and needed something to insert that would be stiff enough to do so.  In that regard, I made a trip to Hobby Lobby and there I found something perfect.  A set of steel rings in the bead / jewelry section that I could fix the slight bow the joins had.  I took one of the rings and got it in place, marked it and then glued on some plastic strips.  I then snugged it into place and glued it.  A good fix!  Section is now as round as I can make it.

I also repainted the interior of the folding panels, the CM and lower section of the Service Module a lighter grey.  After all that was dry, I worked on the Servie Module and got the panels glued together, along with the engine nozzle.  The high-gain antenna had a new rod attached, and is awaiting some pieces for the center section to finish it.  I also glued the RCS units (minus the nozzles) onto the outside of the SM.  Some minor sanding and polishing accompanied all this.  One thing to note is that I did not attempt to use the hinged door on the SM as in the original model.  I have lost some of the components for the interior (oxygen tanks, fuel cells) and did not wish to replicate them, so I've glued the panel shut.  Too bad, but less work overall.

Once the antenna is finished, I'll attach it to the SM and glue the SM heat shield in place.  Then I'll begin work on the Command Module.

(And just for Gamera, work is proceeding on the D-7.)  Smile

Project Director (GAF)

Today in Space History:

1969 January 15 - . 07:04 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511.

  • Soyuz 5 - . Call Sign: Baikal (Baikal - lake in Siberia). Crew: Khrunov, Volynov, Yeliseyev. Backup Crew: Filipchenko, Gorbatko, Kubasov. Payload: Soyuz 7K-OK (P) s/n 13. Mass: 6,585 kg (14,517 lb). Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Filipchenko, Gorbatko, Khrunov, Kubasov, Volynov, Yeliseyev. Agency: MOM. Program: Soyuz. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Soyuz 4/5, Soyuz 5. Spacecraft Bus: Soyuz. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-OK. Duration: 3.04 days. Decay Date: 1969-01-18 . USAF Sat Cat: 3656 . COSPAR: 1969-005A. Apogee: 212 km (131 mi). Perigee: 196 km (121 mi). Inclination: 51.7000 deg. Period: 88.60 min.

    At 3 am an An-12 arrives from Moscow with ten newspapers, and letters for Shatalov, to be delivered by the Soyuz 5 crew to him as the first 'space mail'. At 05:15 the State Commission convened and approved launch at 10:04:30. The countdown proceeds normally; meanwhile communications sessions are held with Shatalov on Soyuz 4. The commission is taken by automobile convoy from Area 2, to Area 17, where the Soyuz 5 crew declares itself ready for flight. At T-25 minutes, with the crew already aboard the spacecraft, a piece of electrical equipment fails and needs to be replaced. Engineer-Captain Viktor Vasilyevich Alyeshin goes to the fuelled booster and replaces it. While doing this he notices that the access hatch has been secured with only three bolts, instead of the four required. Nevertheless the launch proceeds successfully. After Soyuz 5 is in orbit, it and Soyuz 4 begin their mutual series of manoeuvres for rendezvous and docking. Officially the flight conducted scientific, technical and medico-biological research, checking and testing of onboard systems and design elements of space craft, docking of piloted space craft and construction of an experimental space station, transfer of cosmonauts from one craft to another in orbit.


1994 January 15 - .

  • Mir News 204: Soyuz-TM17 returned to earth - . Nation: Russia. Program: Mir. Flight: Soyuz TM-17, Soyuz TM-18, Soyuz TM-18 Mir LD-4.

    On 14.01.1994 at 0819 UTC (08 hrs 18 mins 20 secs) the return capsule of the Soyuz-TM18 landed at 215 KM West of Karaganda in Kazakhstan. The cosmonauts (Tsibliyev and Serebrov) felt well after their flight of 197 days. They will be flown to Starcity near Moscow this afternoon. Again a routine-message about a routine-operation, but yet 'it has been a near thing' and nearly I had to draft a real shocking message!

    Return operation:

    At 0145 UTC the hatch of Soyuz-TM17 was closed behind Tsibliyev and Serebrov. At 0430 UTC the Soyuz-TM17 undocked from Mir. Tsibliyev had got orders to make a short inspection flight around the Mir-complex. They had to make images of the outer surface and they had to give special attention to the APAS89 docking system on Kristall (Module-T). In a distance of 30 Meters S- TM17 deviated from the desired course and collided with the Mir-station. Immediately radio contact with Soyuz-TM17 was lost. After 10 minutes TsUP managed to re-established radio contact with Soyuz-TM17 and the crew reported that their ship did not suffer damages and that the air-seal was still in good order. They also did not see any damages on the Mir-complex. Soyuz-TM17 made its last 2 orbits around the earth and the descent started at abt. 0715 UTC. At 0804 UTC the parachute opened and the 2-tonne heavy capsule made a safe landing at 08.18.20 UTC.

    Mir:

    The new crew (15th Main Expedition) immediately started observations through the portholes to try to determine eventual damages. During the passes in orbits 45206 (1100 UTC) and 45207 (1234 UTC) they transmitted to earth video-images which they made during the departure and fly-around of Soyuz-TM17. Shortly Afanasyev and Usachov will have to make a non-scheduled spacewalk to inspect the place, where Soyuz-TM17 hit the Mir- station. (probably near the APAS89 docking device on Kristall -Module-T).

    Chris v.d. Berg, NL-9165/A-UK3202

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 12:31 PM

Bakster,

I'm loving your X-1! I have the 30 year old Revell kit in my stash.

 

Unfortunatly That scene from the movie is all Hollywood.  The hose conected to the X-1 is a compressed air hose. The truck is an air cart truck. The air is used to spin the starter on jet engines. We used them on the T-38 and any jet that does not have an APU needs it to supply air for starting. They are common on airports both military and civillian.

The X-1 has no need for the compressed air as it is a rocketplane. I'll look over my photos of Glamerous Glennis, But I don't believe there is any hatch in that location.

Also I can't think of a reason that the X-1 would ever be sitting there with the rocket "idleing". I'm no expert, but rockets don't idle and the X-1 rocket was not throttleable. It had 4 chambers that could be fired one at a time or all at once to control the thrust.

 

I'm just guessing here, but It looks like the X-1 mockup used in the movie was rigged to accept the air hose and the fake rocket has some kind of "fuel" source to burn while the high pressure air was blown by it for the rocket effect. It's very well done in the movie, looks great, but all fake.

 

None the less, It would make a great diorama!

sig

  • Member since
    June, 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 12:46 PM

Nice work on the X-1 and the mini shuttle is looking nice so far too. I still just love this GB and the people building in it. Keep up the good work!

Ben

I am a Veteran; to all other Veterans thank you for your service. Retired now and living well

PROJECTS:

- 1/350 USS Alabama - Staged

- 1/48 C-130 - Staged

- 1/16 Kubelwagen (GB) - Done

- 1/16 Field Marshall Romell - Done

- 1/350 HMS Roberts (GB) - Done

- 1/35 STRV -103 MBT (GB) - Done

 

 

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 1:35 PM

Mach71>  Thanks for the info on the movie X-1.  I had suspected that it was pure Holywood.  The picture of the X-1E I posted does show a hose and is labeled an engine test, but what I think is happening is purging the fuel system.  That would make more sense.

Drums01> Always glad to have you around!  Not much going on at the moment, but I'm still plugging away.  Need to do a little painting this afternoon, so I'll probably have an update (small as it is) later tonight.

Gary

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 4:42 PM

mach71

Bakster,

I'm loving your X-1! I have the 30 year old Revell kit in my stash.

 

Unfortunatly That scene from the movie is all Hollywood.  The hose conected to the X-1 is a compressed air hose. The truck is an air cart truck. The air is used to spin the starter on jet engines. We used them on the T-38 and any jet that does not have an APU needs it to supply air for starting. They are common on airports both military and civillian.

The X-1 has no need for the compressed air as it is a rocketplane. I'll look over my photos of Glamerous Glennis, But I don't believe there is any hatch in that location.

Also I can't think of a reason that the X-1 would ever be sitting there with the rocket "idleing". I'm no expert, but rockets don't idle and the X-1 rocket was not throttleable. It had 4 chambers that could be fired one at a time or all at once to control the thrust.

 

I'm just guessing here, but It looks like the X-1 mockup used in the movie was rigged to accept the air hose and the fake rocket has some kind of "fuel" source to burn while the high pressure air was blown by it for the rocket effect. It's very well done in the movie, looks great, but all fake.

 

None the less, It would make a great diorama!

 

Ah! I knew someone out there would have some info. That is some awesome info, sir. Thank you for that! 

Yeah--I suspected it might be hollywood stuff too. That scene didn't make sense, as Gary noted. None the less, it was good drama!  And like you said--it would make for a nice dio. Though not accurate in any stretch of the imagination--I will still do it. It will look cool. I will probably lead the hose up into one of the wheel wells. It's fiction--so I am not gonna sweat that detail.

Thanks for enjoying my build. You guys are giving me a spark of motivation.  

 

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 4:44 PM

DRUMS01

Nice work on the X-1 and the mini shuttle is looking nice so far too. I still just love this GB and the people building in it. Keep up the good work!

Ben

 

Thanks, Commander Drums!

Yes 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 8:33 PM

Bakster, unless you plan to show it, I doubt anyone who would see it would be any the wiser.  Sounds like a fun dio.

Steve

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 8:36 PM

PF: Those decals are cool, they're going to look great on there!

Mach71: Interesting, I didn't even think about the lack of sense of the  rocket motor running on the ground while watching the film...

Gary: They look cool to me, both the service module and the D-7.

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 8:55 PM

modelcrazy

Bakster, unless you plan to show it, I doubt anyone who would see it would be any the wiser.  Sounds like a fun dio.

 

Thank Steve, and nope... no plans to show it. I plan on doing it.

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 9:32 PM

Bakster>  Never let reality stand in the way of a good diorama!  Big Smile  Since there's a photo of a hose attached to the Bell X-1E, I say go ahead!  Should be dramatic.

Gamera>  Thanks!  I actually touched up the paint on the D-7 today after some fill and sanding.  After a few days to let the touch-up cure, I'll start masking for the second color coat.  Weather permitting!

Ben> I forgot to mention your signature pic!  Nice!  You should grab a Group Build Badge to include with it (if you want).  Smile

Project Report:

Some painting was done today on various items.  The top of the Service Module was painted light grey and the tops of the tanks were painted "Steel".  I'm at a quandry about what color to paint the tubing and conduit.  Steel or yellow?  Not sure, and there's not much info on a standard conbination.  Images vary, or are not very clear.  Decisions, decisions!

I've finished up the High-Gain Antenna for the Service Module and it is awaiting paint and connecting to the Service Module heat shield.  I've also gloss coated the LES and the lower section of the LM Storage Area to help seal the paper parts.  They are about ready for paint.  Still trying to make decisions about the folding doors and whether to glue them together or not.  Trying to think of various options.

Parts for the LM are ready to glue, and she's pretty much awaiting paint.  Another decision to make about the areas to be painted black.  The SM heat shield and engine nozzle are awaiting paint.  If I have a streak of good, warm weather I might actually get some paint work done!  Good luck with that in wintertime!

Meanwhile, I've found some nice image of the panels for the interior of the Command Module.  Unfortunately, my color cartridge for the printer is out of ink, so I need to pick up a new one.  The expense of that may delay printing the panels out, and decals.  Still got a few months, however.  If nothing else, I can always work on the base!  Smile

Mission Director (GAF)

Today in Space History:

1946 January 16 - . Launch Site: White Sands. Launch Complex: White Sands. Launch Vehicle: V-2.

  • V-2 flight tests in US initiated. - . Nation: Germany. Related Persons: von Braun.
  • U.S. upper atmosphere research program initiated with captured German V-2 rockets. A V-2 panel of representatives of various interested agencies was created, and a total of more than 60 V-2's were fired before the supply ran out. The Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University then undertook to develop a medium-altitude rocket, the Aerobee, while the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) directed its efforts to the development of a large high-altitude rocket, first called the Neptune, later the Viking.


1969 January 16 - . 12:43 GMT - .

  • A day after the launch of Soyuz 5, Soyuz 4 docked with it. The Soyuz 4 active spacecraft was equipped with a long docking probe, designated 'Shtir'. The Soyuz 5 target spacecraft was equipped with the 'Konus' receptacle. The symbology lead Volynov to joke that he 'was being raped' when the hard docking was accomplished. Khrunov and Yeliseyev transferred to and returned in Soyuz 4, the feat they had hoped to accomplish in the cancelled Soyuz 2 flight almost two years earlier. The external crew transfer was also a test of the technique needed for the Soviet lunar landing.


1978 January 16 - .

  • The group was selected to provide pilot, engineer, and scientist astronauts for space shuttle flights. Recruit women and minorities to introduce diversity into the astronaut corps. Qualifications: Pilots: Bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics. Advanced degree desirable. At least 1,000 flight-hours of pilot-in-command time. Flight test experience desirable. Excellent health. Vision minimum 20/50 uncorrected, correctable to 20/20 vision; maximum sitting blood pressure 140/90. Height between 163 and 193 cm.

  • Mission Specialists: Bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics and minimum three years of related experience or an advanced degree. Vision minimum 20/150 uncorrected, correctable to 20/20. Maximum sitting blood pressure of 140/90. Height between 150 and 193 cm.. 8,079 applicants, of which half met the basic qualifications. 208 invited for physical tests and interviews. Of the 35 selected, six were women, three were male African-Americans, and one was a male Asian-American.

  • (NOTE: Mike Mullane of this group wrote a good autobiography of his time with the Shuttle program, "Riding Rockets".  Good read.  He states that the Columbia tragedy was not the only time the o-rings on the solid rocket boosters failed, and it was only sheer luck that more lives were not lost.  It does make me wonder about their use on the new SLS for the Orion, even if they say they've worked the problems out.  Famous last words.)

 

 

 

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.