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The Race Into Space GB, October 2018 - July 2019

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GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, April 11, 2019 11:30 PM

Watched the Falcon Heavy launch tonight.  Was spectacular!  The most powerful booster since the Saturn V!

I don't have much to report tonight.  I've been puttying around the heat shield and the CM body trying to smooth it out.  The 2nd layer of putty is on now, and after that is dry I'll sand it out and hopefully that will be good.  I have a feeling, however, that a 3rd layer will be necessary.  Things just go that way.

Some interesting things happened today in space history.

Today in Space History:

1961 April 11 - .

  • Vostok 1 countdown - . Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Feoktistov, Gagarin, Korolev, Titov, Yazdovskiy. Program: Vostok. Flight: Vostok 1. Spacecraft: Vostok.

    The booster is rolled out to the pad at 05:00. At 10:00 the cosmonauts meet with Feoktistov for a last review of the flight plan. Launch is set of 09:07 the next day, followed by shutdown and jettison of the lateral boosters of the first stage at 09:09, and orbital insertion at 09:18. The spacecraft will orient itself toward the sun for retrofire at 09:50. At 10:15 the first command sequence will be uploaded to the spacecraft, followed by the second at 10:18 and the third at 10:25. Retrofire of the TDU engine will commence at 10:25:47. The service module will separate from the capsule at 10:36 as the capsule begins re-entry. The capsule's parachute will deploy at 10:43:43 and at 10:44:12 the cosmonaut's ejection seat will fire. While the cosmonauts go through this, the booster has been brought upright on the pad, the service towers raised, and all umbilical connections made. Korolev, Yazdovskiy, and the others make a final inspection at the pad prior to the commencement of the countdown. At 13:00 Gagarin meets a group of soldiers, NCO's, and officers. After this Kamanin and the cosmonauts go to the cottage formerly occupied by Marshal Nedelin, where they will spend the last night before launch. They eat 'space food' out of 160 g toothpaste-type tubes for lunch - two servings of meat puree and one of chocolate sauce. Gagarin's blood pressure is measured as 115/60, pulse 64, body temperature 36.8 deg C. He then subjects to placement of the biosensors he will wear during the flight, and baseline measurements are taken for an hour and twenty minutes. He is very calm through all this. At 21:30 Korolev comes to the cottage, says good night to the cosmonauts, then goes back out to check on launch preparations. Gagarin and Titov go to bed after this. Kamanin stays up a while in the next room, listening to them talk to one another in the dark.


1970 April 11 - . 19:13 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39A. Launch Platform: LUT3. Launch Vehicle: Saturn V.

  • Apollo 13 - . Call Sign: Odyssey. Crew: Haise, Lovell, Swigert. Backup Crew: Duke, Mattingly, Young. Support Crew: Brand, Kerwin, Lousma. Payload: Apollo CSM 109 / Apollo LM 7 / ALSEP / S-IVB-508. Mass: 28,790 kg (63,470 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brand, Duke, Haise, Kerwin, Lousma, Lovell, Mattingly, Swigert, Young. Agency: NASA Houston. Program: Apollo. Class: Moon. Type: Manned lunar spacecraft. Flight: Apollo 13. Spacecraft: Apollo CSM. Duration: 5.95 days. Decay Date: 1970-04-17 . USAF Sat Cat: 4371 . COSPAR: 1970-029A. Apogee: 186 km (115 mi). Perigee: 184 km (114 mi). Inclination: 32.50 deg. Period: 88.31 min.

    Apollo 13 (AS-508) was launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, KSC, at 2:13 p.m. EST April 11, with astronauts James A. Lovell, Jr., John L. Swigert, Jr., and Fred W. Haise, Jr., aboard. The spacecraft and S-IVB stage entered a parking orbit with a 185.5-kilometer apogee and a 181.5-kilometer perigee. At 3:48 p.m., onboard TV was begun for five and one-half minutes. At 4:54 p.m., an S-IVB burn placed the spacecraft on a translunar trajectory, after which the CSM separated from the S-IVB and LM Aquarius. (The crew had named lunar module 7 Aquarius and CSM 109 Odyssey.) The CSM then hard-docked with the LM. The S-IVB auxiliary propulsion system made an evasive maneuver after CSM/LM ejection from the S-IVB at 6:14 p.m. The docking and ejection maneuvers were televised during a 72-minute period in which interior and exterior views of the spacecraft were also shown.

    At 8:13 p.m. EST a 217-second S-IVB auxiliary propulsion system burn aimed the S-IVB for a lunar target point so accurately that another burn was not required. The S-IVB/IU impacted the lunar surface at 8:10 p.m. EST on April 14 at a speed of 259 meters per second. Impact was 137.1 kilometers from the Apollo 12 seismometer. The seismic signal generated by the impact lasted 3 hours 20 minutes and was so strong that a ground command was necessary to reduce seismometer gain and keep the recording on the scale. The suprathermal ion detector experiment, also deployed by the Apollo 12 crew, recorded a jump in the number of ions from zero at the time of impact up to 2,500 shortly thereafter and then back to a zero count. Scientists theorized that ionization had been produced by 6,300 K to 10,300 K (6,000 degrees C to 10,000 degrees C) temperature generated by the impact or that particles had reached an altitude of 60 kilometers from the lunar surface and had been ionized by sunlight.

    Meanwhile back in the CSM/LM, the crew had been performing the routine housekeeping duties associated with the period of the translunar coast. At 30:40 ground elapsed time a midcourse correction maneuver took the spacecraft off a free-return trajectory in order to control the arrival time at the moon. Ensuring proper lighting conditions at the landing site. The maneuver placed the spacecraft on the desired trajectory, on which the closest approach to the moon would be 114.9 kilometers.

    At 10:08 p.m. EST April 13, the crew reported an undervoltage alarm on the CSM main bus B, rapid loss of pressure in SM oxygen tank No. 2, and dropping current in fuel cells 1 and 3 to a zero reading. The loss of oxygen and primary power in the service module required an immediate abort of the mission. The astronauts powered up the LM, powered down the CSM, and used the LM systems for power and life support. The first maneuver following the abort decision was made with the descent propulsion system to place the spacecraft back in a free-return trajectory around the moon. After the spacecraft swung around the moon, another maneuver reduced the coast time back to earth and moved the landing point from the Indian Ocean to the South Pacific.

  • Apollo 13 LM - . Call Sign: Aquarius. Payload: Apollo LM 7. Mass: 15,192 kg (33,492 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NASA Houston. Program: Apollo. Class: Moon. Type: Manned lunar spacecraft. Flight: Apollo 13. Spacecraft: Apollo LM. Duration: 5.95 days. Decay Date: 1970-04-17 . USAF Sat Cat: 4371 . COSPAR: 1970-029x. Apogee: 186 km (115 mi). Perigee: 184 km (114 mi). Inclination: 32.50 deg. Period: 88.31 min.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

April 11, 2019 - 6:35 pm EDT / 2235 GMT; Launch Site: Cape Canaveral

Space X's Falcon Heavy, the most powerful operational launch vehicle, placed the Arabsat-6A communications satellite into orbit.  All three sections of the booster returned to ground and landed successfully.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

April 11, 2019 - 3:25 pm EDT / 1925 GMT

The robotic Bereshet spacecraft, built by SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), aimed to become the first Israeli craft, and the first privately funded mission, ever to land softly on the moon. But the little robot couldn't quite make it, crashing into the gray dirt around 3:25 p.m. EDT (1925 GMT). Mission control lost communications with the spacecraft when it was about 489 feet (149 meters) above the moon's surface.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, April 11, 2019 11:44 PM

I didn’t watch it live but I viewed it none the less. Spectacular is a good word for it.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Friday, April 12, 2019 4:35 PM

They stuck the landing 3 times! Very well done.

 

Sad for Beresheet. They impacted the moon.

Space is hard.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ayu0GsrvKQA

 

Not much progress. I got the outer and inner windows installed.

 

 

 

I started the 2nd round of decals on the retro pack:

 

 

 

The 3rd round of decals coming up is suposed to be the worst.

I might get them started tomorrow.

sig

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, April 12, 2019 7:22 PM

Mach71>  Space IS hard!  Failure is not an option... it's built in!  Wink

You're coming along nicely on the decals.  Great work!

I'm finishing up the CM and think I have the puttying and sanding done.  I'm masking the windows in prep for the final paint job, so I'm hoping that will be completed soon.  But the weather may not cooperate for a few days!

Today in Space History:

Another important date.  The first man in space, Yuri Gagarin, and the first space shuttle launch.

1961 April 12 - . 06:07 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Vostok 8K72K.

  • Vostok 1 - . Call Sign: Kedr (Cedar ). Crew: Gagarin. Backup Crew: Nelyubov, Titov. Payload: Vostok 3KA s/n 3. Mass: 4,725 kg (10,416 lb). Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Gagarin, Karpov, Keldysh, Korolev, Moskalenko, Nelyubov, Rudnev, Titov. Agency: RVSN. Program: Vostok. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Vostok 1. Spacecraft: Vostok. Duration: 0.0750 days. Decay Date: 1961-04-12 . USAF Sat Cat: 103 . COSPAR: 1961-Mu-1. Apogee: 315 km (195 mi). Perigee: 169 km (105 mi). Inclination: 65.00 deg. Period: 89.30 min.

    First manned spaceflight, one orbit of the earth. Three press releases were prepared, one for success, two for failures. It was only known ten minutes after burnout, 25 minutes after launch, if a stable orbit had been achieved.

    The payload included life-support equipment and radio and television to relay information on the condition of the pilot. The flight was automated; Gagarin's controls were locked to prevent him from taking control of the ship. The combination to unlock the controls was available in a sealed envelope in case it became necessary to take control in an emergency. After retrofire, the service module remained attached to the Sharik reentry sphere by a wire bundle. The joined craft went through wild gyrations at the beginning of re-entry, before the wires burned through. The Sharik, as it was designed to do, then naturally reached aerodynamic equilibrium with the heat shield positioned correctly.

    Gagarin ejected after re-entry and descended under his own parachute, as was planned. However for many years the Soviet Union denied this, because the flight would not have been recognized for various FAI world records unless the pilot had accompanied his craft to a landing. Recovered April 12, 1961 8:05 GMT. Landed Southwest of Engels Smelovka, Saratov.


1981 April 12 - . 12:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39A. Launch Platform: MLP1. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle.

  • STS-1 - . Call Sign: Columbia. Crew: Crippen, Young. Payload: Columbia F01 / DFI. Mass: 4,909 kg (10,822 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Crippen, Young. Agency: NASA Houston. Program: STS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: STS-1. Spacecraft Bus: Shuttle. Spacecraft: Columbia. Duration: 2.26 days. Decay Date: 1981-04-14 . USAF Sat Cat: 12399 . COSPAR: 1981-034A. Apogee: 251 km (155 mi). Perigee: 240 km (140 mi). Inclination: 40.30 deg. Period: 89.40 min. First flight of Space Transportation System (aka Space Shuttle).. Payloads: Development Flight Instrumentation and Aerodynamic Coefficient Identification Package..

  • DFI - . Payload: DFI PLT. Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Program: STS. Spacecraft Bus: Shuttle Attached Payloads. Spacecraft: DFI. Decay Date: 1981-04-14 . USAF Sat Cat: 12399 . COSPAR: 1981-034xx. Apogee: 272 km (169 mi). Perigee: 260 km (160 mi). Inclination: 40.30 deg. Period: 89.80 min.


 

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Friday, April 12, 2019 10:02 PM

Gary,

Good deal that the sanding is done! Thats my least favorite task.

I hope the weather holds.

 

BTW, Thanks for the model show photos.

sig

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Saturday, April 13, 2019 4:27 PM

No photo's, but you can see that one of my retro pack motors has the decal all wonky.

I managed to get it off, not as easy as I thought! Most came off with a piece of tape, but a few radials would not budge! I had to sand and repaint the top of that motor. 

 

I'm off to work today, I hope to get the decals finished on Monday.

sig

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, April 13, 2019 5:49 PM

Mach71> Yes, I can see some misalignment on the stripes on the retro-rocket.  Guess these things are normal, but I know it'll come out in the end.  Everythings looking good.

Progress Report:

Weather did manage to cooperate a bit today, though it sounds as if it will turn nasty later tonight.  I got a good coat of paint on, thought it needs a bit of touch-up for the black around the windows.  I also need to reinstall the window glass as I managed to knock it out while removing masking.  Oh, well.  I think the major paint work is done!

Now we turn our attention to final details on the Launch Escape Tower; snugging up the nose cone on the CM so it is not as loose; micro-bending some of the folding doors so they fit a little tighter; finalizing the base; and finally printing out some decals.  I hope to be finished this week!

Today in Space History:

"Houston, we've had a problem."

1970 April 13 -

  • Apollo 13 - . Call Sign: Odyssey. Crew: Haise, Lovell, Swigert. Backup Crew: Duke, Mattingly, Young. Support Crew: Brand, Kerwin, Lousma. Payload: Apollo CSM 109 / Apollo LM 7 / ALSEP / S-IVB-508. Mass: 28,790 kg (63,470 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brand, Duke, Haise, Kerwin, Lousma, Lovell, Mattingly, Swigert, Young. Agency: NASA Houston. Program: Apollo. Class: Moon. Type: Manned lunar spacecraft. Flight: Apollo 13. Spacecraft: Apollo CSM. Duration: 5.95 days. Decay Date: 1970-04-17 . USAF Sat Cat: 4371 . COSPAR: 1970-029A. Apogee: 186 km (115 mi). Perigee: 184 km (114 mi). Inclination: 32.50 deg. Period: 88.31 min.

    Apollo 13 (AS-508) was launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, KSC, at 2:13 p.m. EST April 11, with astronauts James A. Lovell, Jr., John L. Swigert, Jr., and Fred W. Haise, Jr., aboard.

    At 10:08 p.m. EST April 13, the crew reported an undervoltage alarm on the CSM main bus B, rapid loss of pressure in SM oxygen tank No. 2, and dropping current in fuel cells 1 and 3 to a zero reading. The loss of oxygen and primary power in the service module required an immediate abort of the mission. The astronauts powered up the LM, powered down the CSM, and used the LM systems for power and life support. The first maneuver following the abort decision was made with the descent propulsion system to place the spacecraft back in a free-return trajectory around the moon. After the spacecraft swung around the moon, another maneuver reduced the coast time back to earth and moved the landing point from the Indian Ocean to the South Pacific.

  • Apollo 13 LM - . Call Sign: Aquarius. Payload: Apollo LM 7. Mass: 15,192 kg (33,492 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NASA Houston. Program: Apollo. Class: Moon. Type: Manned lunar spacecraft. Flight: Apollo 13. Spacecraft: Apollo LM. Duration: 5.95 days. Decay Date: 1970-04-17 . USAF Sat Cat: 4371 . COSPAR: 1970-029x. Apogee: 186 km (115 mi). Perigee: 184 km (114 mi). Inclination: 32.50 deg. Period: 88.31 min.


 

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, April 13, 2019 5:53 PM

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, April 15, 2019 11:13 AM

Those look great guys!!! 

 

Gary: Glad you had a good time at the show. Nice to see lots of open space there, too many around here they try to squeeze too many people in too small venues. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, April 15, 2019 1:32 PM

Gamera

Those look great guys!!! 

Gary: Glad you had a good time at the show. Nice to see lots of open space there, too many around here they try to squeeze too many people in too small venues. 

Yes, the venue is the City Meeting Center in Anniston.  It is rather a medium sized show.  Not so many professional vendors as just people selling their stuff.  I wish I had gotten more pictures of the show, but I'm fumble-fingered when it comes to this camera phone.

Got some more painting on the CM as touch-up today.  I think it's ready now, and I'll re-install the windows I knocked out and start some detailing today.  I should have a report this evening on progress.

Gary

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Monday, April 15, 2019 8:30 PM

Work continues on the canopy. As Gam mentioned it is hard to match the color even with using the same paint sample. I checked it today and it looked lighter in comparison to the airframe. So, I gave it another heavy dose of color. So much for my trying to keep the paint layer thin. NOT. Hopefully, todays will be it for color. If not, I might just have to call it good and punt after adding the Dullcote. Then pray that pulling the masking doesn't fracture the edges.

Meanwhile--work continues on my desertscape. Using Sulptamold I fashioned a sort of dirt/sand berm. This will be my first attempt at landscape. So, it will be interesting. Tongue Tied

Excuse the clutter.

That is all for now.

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, April 15, 2019 9:56 PM

Bakster> I'll keep the proverbial fingers crossed for your canopy!  Sounds like you've got it covered, so we'll hope for the best!  Big Smile  The landscape really looks the part.  The presentation will be awesome!

Progress Report:

A fresh touch-up around the base of the Command Module took care of the last of the blemishes between the heat shield and the capsule.  Window glass was re-installed with Aleene's Clear Gel and then the RCS nozzles were dotted with black paint using a toothpick.  Some details on the Launch Escape Tower were added by penciling in and then using an X-Acto knife to scribe the canards for the guidance system, along with a small, RCS port at the center of the canard doors.

 

The LES needs a bit of touch-up paint for the canards, plus I want to try and add some "boots" at the point where the LES legs attach to the CM (you can see one on the left leg in the first picture). Otherwise the CM / LES is ready for decals.  I need to get those ready and printed.  Can I finish this up this week?  We'll see!

Mission Director (GAF)

Today in Space History:

1966 April 15 - .

  • NASA said to need a manned space flight goal other than "using Apollo hardware" - a Mars flyby or landing mission. - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Gilruth, Mueller. Spacecraft: IMIS 1968, Von Braun Mars Expedition - 1969.

    NASA said to need a manned space flight goal other than "using Apollo hardware" - a Mars flyby or landing mission. MSC Director Robert R. Gilruth summarized Houston's position expressed during discussions with Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight George E. Mueller two days earlier. Gilruth cited NASA s need for a manned space flight goal other than 'using Apollo hardware' (and suggested a Mars flyby or landing mission as an in-house focus for planning.) Also, he repeated his concern over the imbalance between AAP goals and resources, as well as the extent of engineering redesign and hardware modification that had been forced upon the project. Though expressing his and MSC's desire to contribute to and be a part of AAP, Gilruth voiced concern that 'the future of manned space flight . . . is in jeopardy because we do not have firm goals, and because the present approach appears to us to be technically unsound.'


1970 April 15 - .

  • Apollo 13 swings behind the moon - . Nation: USA. Flight: Apollo 13.

    At 00:21:35 GMT Apollo 13 passed behind the moon, out of radio contact with earth. Flying high above the lunar surface, the crew reached a distance of 401,056 km from the center of the earth, an all-time altitude record. At 02:40:39 GMT the cold, exhausted, and ailing crew conducted a completely manual 4 minute 23 second burn of the LM descent engine to reduce the coast time back to earth and moved the landing point from the Indian Ocean to the South Pacific.

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Monday, April 15, 2019 10:35 PM

Thanks Gary. And may I say wholeheartedly that your CM is looking awesome. Sweet work and I love that model!

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, April 17, 2019 11:35 AM

Bakster: The base is coming along great, nice work!

Gary: Nice job there on the CM and escape tower! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Wednesday, April 17, 2019 2:44 PM

Nothing new to report, I'm working. But I did find my self in DC today with a few hours off. I took these photo's at the NASM.

 

 

 

 

 

 

And a few for what could be my next build:

 

 

 

Or it might be something else.....

sig

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, April 17, 2019 3:07 PM

Mach71: Thanks!!! Awesome photos!!! 

 

I've got to get back up there before too long. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, April 17, 2019 4:59 PM

Thanks for the X1 pics, Mach. Cool pics all around....

 

Yes

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Currently in the Dallas area
Posted by modelcrazy on Thursday, April 18, 2019 1:45 PM

Just happen to be able to go to the NASM. Wow, been wanting to go there all my life. 

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/72 Revell Eurofighter Typhoon Twin Seater
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales

In Que

1/72 Airfix Dakota Mk. IV
1/72 Revell Mig 29

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Thursday, April 18, 2019 2:32 PM

modelcrazy

Just happen to be able to go to the NASM. Wow, been wanting to go there all my life. 

 

 

Work takes me away from home. Sometimes it works out well, and I get to visit a museum.

 

If you can make it to DC, NASM is a must see, along with the Udvar-Hazy annex out at Dulles and about 100 other things. Another good thing about Washington DC is that most things are free. The only museums that cost money are the Newseum and the spy museum.

NASM is in the middle of a multi year renovation. The west wing and part of the east wing are closed to visitors. The Apollo gallery is closed. I hope it will stay and is just getting a refresh.

On the bad side, I'm away from family and my work bench.

sig

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Currently in the Dallas area
Posted by modelcrazy on Thursday, April 18, 2019 3:40 PM

mach71
On the bad side, I'm away from family and my work bench

Yeah, you're an airline pilot correct?

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/72 Revell Eurofighter Typhoon Twin Seater
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales

In Que

1/72 Airfix Dakota Mk. IV
1/72 Revell Mig 29

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Thursday, April 18, 2019 8:09 PM

Yes, I am. 

 

I hope to start the final decaling on the retro pack tomorrow. When I put the replacement decal on Monday it would not settle down. I had to keep hitting it with setting solution.

 

I started on the V2 today. Its a snap kit with only 12 parts. The engineering is actually very good. 

 

 

 

 

The plastic is not styrene, I think its ABS. I think Pegasus likes using that. I started using Testors black bottle, but I don't think it works on ABS so I switched tenex. 

 

I think I'll go with the olive drab, white, and black paint.

 

 

 

 

sig

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Friday, April 19, 2019 10:31 AM

Really cool work going on in the group build guys.

I'm still plugging along.  Got everything attached and now making adjustments and filling seams.  I hope to start painting soon.

Mr Werner VonMeow doing a photobomb inspection.  

  • Member since
    June, 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Friday, April 19, 2019 12:31 PM

Holy cow everyone, there has been quite some progress since I finished my kits. I really believe that the skills being shown here are second to none. There is soo much going on I cannot limit my enjoyment to just one or two kits. 

Stunning work everyone!

Ben

I am a Veteran; to all other Veterans thank you for your service. Retired now and living well

PROJECTS:

- 1/350 USS Alabama - Staged

- 1/48 C-130 - Staged

- 1/16 Kubelwagen (GB) - Done

- 1/16 Field Marshall Romell - Done

- 1/350 HMS Roberts (GB) - Done

- 1/35 STRV -103 MBT (GB) - Done

 

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Friday, April 19, 2019 12:53 PM

modelcrazy

Just happen to be able to go to the NASM. Wow, been wanting to go there all my life. 

 

Lucky Dog. I want to go there too.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Friday, April 19, 2019 12:57 PM

Scott, your rocket is looking great! Give Mr Werner VonMeow a treat for me. I had to do a double take. He looks just like SammieCat that is visiting me for a spell.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Friday, April 19, 2019 1:00 PM

Hey Mach... I was secretly hoping you’d pick the V2. Looks cool.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Friday, April 19, 2019 2:48 PM

Okay--the canopy is demasked. It came out about as good as I can expect. Certainly, better than I feared. Cutting along the tape edge may have helped. I guess that I will never know.

One of the supplied masks didn't butt up to that left edge all that well. Maybe a sharpened toothpick and just pick at it? Unless you have some advice on how to fix that--I'll leave it alone. Unless a person has eagle eyes, it will probably never be seen.

Here is something interesting though. In my last update I had noted how the piece was lighter compared to the airframe and how I decided to hit it with another coat of color. Well, I did. Guess what? It still didn't match. So much so, that I triple checked to make sure I was using the correct paint sample. I sat there thinking on if I should try another coat of paint. Looking at it though, it seemed that it should be fine with what I applied. I started wondering if the flat coat on the airframe had altered the hue. That seemed like the only logical explanation. With that in mind--I finished out the canopy with a coat of flat. I set it aside to cure for a few days and checked it today. Well I'll be. It matches. That confirms that the Testors Dullcote shifted the hue from the orange I had, to a slighty more red. Who'd a thunk.

 

And that's that.

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Friday, April 19, 2019 3:22 PM

Bakster that canopy looks great! I can't find the glitch you mention. The color looks perfect. Very well done!

 

I worked for over an hour today gettin the decals on one of the retro motor's. Each band is an individual decal and the all need to be a slightly different length.

 

 

I think I should let the decals dry well before I move on to the next pack. 

My old eyes can't take much more of this right now.

sig

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Friday, April 19, 2019 3:38 PM

I got some putty on the V2. 

 

sig

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Currently in the Dallas area
Posted by modelcrazy on Friday, April 19, 2019 3:43 PM

Wow, really looking great guys, superb job on the canopy, Scott, I'd live to see that monster launch. Mach glad you picked the V2 as well

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/72 Revell Eurofighter Typhoon Twin Seater
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales

In Que

1/72 Airfix Dakota Mk. IV
1/72 Revell Mig 29

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