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The Race Into Space GB, October 2018 - July 2019 (Ended)

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  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 10:43 PM

Nice touch with the video, Gary. Thanks again!

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 10:32 PM

Mission Report (Final):  I want to thank all the participants who contributed to this group build.  I also want to thank Modelcrazy for agreeing to help co-host the GB.  It's been a wild ride, but we managed to complete the objectives and finish up with flying colors!  We had a nice selection of models built, and I even managed to finish up some things that have been sitting around for 50 years.  It turned out to be a nice tribute to the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.  I hope you've enjoyed our journey through space history as much as I did and might even be inspired to build even more model spacecraft.

In conclusion, I'll leave you with a scene from Apollo 13.

 

It has been a privilege.

Mission Director (GAF)  Gary, signing off.   

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 10:23 PM

GAF

 

 
Bakster

Hey Gam, your astronaut looks great! Nice work sir and I see that you found more Rolos!

 

 

The astronaut looks as if he's wondering why the spacecraft smells like chocolate!  Big Smile

Gary

 

Lol. Or maybe Gam has been feeding him chocolate and he is on a sugar rush!

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 10:21 PM

Hey Gary, your boosters look great! I love how you photograped them too by using the TV. That is a nice backdrop! Nice work sir...

I am sorry to see this GB end, it has been fun. 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 10:16 PM

GAF

Well, at least you guys don't have to go into quarantine (though maybe one or two of you should)!  Big Smile

Enjoy!

Gary

 

Hey, I resemble that remark!

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 10:14 PM

Bakster

Hey Gam, your astronaut looks great! Nice work sir and I see that you found more Rolos!

The astronaut looks as if he's wondering why the spacecraft smells like chocolate!  Big Smile

Gary

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 10:12 PM

Hey Gam, your astronaut looks great! Nice work sir and I see that you found more Rolos!

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 10:12 PM

In commemoration of the Apollo 11 splashdown, here's the last Man On the Moon bubblegum cards.

 

Well, at least you guys don't have to go into quarantine (though maybe one or two of you should)!  Big Smile

Enjoy!

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 10:05 PM

Final Mission Report:  After a few unexpected setbacks, the 3 AMT Man In Space modified boosters are finished.  Had to redo the engines for the Titan II, but they actually are an improvement over what I had, so no complaints there.  You can hardly see them through the support structure.

I also used Mach71's trick of using the TV as a backdrop.  That bright spot you see is an anomally.  Our technicians are looking into it.  Wink

That's all for now.  Signing off.

Mission Director (GAF)

Today In Space History:

1969 July 24 - .

  • Landing of Apollo 11 - . Return Crew: Aldrin, Armstrong, Collins. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Aldrin, Armstrong, Collins. Program: Apollo. Flight: Apollo 11.

    At 16:50 GMT Apollo 11's command module Columbia splashed down in the mid-Pacific, about 24 kilometers from the recovery ship U.S.S. Hornet. Following decontamination procedures at the point of splashdown, the astronauts were carried by helicopter to the Hornet where they entered a mobile quarantine facility to begin a period of observation under strict quarantine conditions. The CM was recovered and removed to the quarantine facility. Sample containers and film were flown to Houston.

    All primary mission objectives and all detailed test objectives of Apollo 11 were met, and all crew members remained in good health.

 


1975 July 24 - .

  • Landing of Apollo (ASTP) - . Return Crew: Brand, Slayton, Stafford. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brand, Slayton, Stafford. Program: ASTP. Flight: Apollo (ASTP).

    Apollo (ASTP) landed at 21:18 GMT, 7.3 km from the recovery ship New Orleans. It was the last splashdown of an American space capsule. However the flight of the last Apollo spacecraft was marred by the fact that the crew almost perished while the capsule was descending under its parachute.

    A failure in switchology led the automatic landing sequence to be not armed at the same time the reaction control system was still active. When the Apollo hadn't begun the parachute deployment sequence by 7,000 metres altitude, Brand hit the manual switches for the apex cover and the drogues. The manual deployment of the drogue chutes caused the CM to sway, and the reaction control system thrusters worked vigorously to counteract that motion. When the crew finally armed the automatic ELS 30 seconds later, the thruster action terminated.

    During that 30 seconds, the cabin was flooded with a mixture of toxic unignited propellants from the thrusters. Prior to drogue deployment, the cabin pressure relief valve had opened automatically, and in addition to drawing in fresh air it also brought in unwanted gases being expelled from the roll thrusters located about 0.6 meter from the relief valve. Brand manually deployed the main parachutes at about 2,700 meters despite the gas fumes in the cabin.

    By the time of splashdown, the crew was nearly unconscious from the fumes, Stafford managed to get an oxygen mask over Brand's face. He then began to come around. When the command module was upright in the water, Stafford opened the vent valve, and with the in-rush of air the remaining fumes disappeared. The crew ended up with a two-week hospital stay in Honolulu. For Slayton, it also meant the discovery of a small lesion on his left lung and an exploratory operation that indicated it was a non-malignant tumour.

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 9:49 PM

Gamera>  Excellent job on the astronaut figure!  Well done.  Glad you got him finished with moments to spare, just as any good test pilot should!  Wink

In recognition of this goal, I am proud to award you your "Astronaut Modeler's Wings".

Congratulations!

I'll update the front page asap.

Gary

 

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 6:05 PM

Neil looks great!

 

Nice job.

 

Ouch Gary, them gremlins are working overtime to block your boosters.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 5:31 PM

Ouch! That sucks Gary. Good luck with the repairs and getting the extra decals in place.

Anyway stick a fork in the astronaut, there's a few little things I'm going to keep working on but I'm pretty much done:

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 1:30 PM

Hey Gary--sorry to hear about the breakage. Dang Gremlins. Angry

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, July 23, 2019 11:23 PM

Gamera>  Sounds like you've already finished, just waiting for photos now.  You'll get 'er done, I'm sure.  Big Smile

Sorry to hear about the D-Day event.  I've had that happen with a couple of events I was attending as a spectator where they canceled but didn't inform the public through an announcement online.  Oh, well.  It happens.  You would think a club would keep members informed.  Sounds like time for new officers!

Update:  I was hoping to be done tonight, but things don't always work out as planned.  During gloss coating the boosters, I accidentally dropped the Gemini / Titan II booster.  This broke off the capsule and the engine nozzles, which was a bit of a set-back.  I've already repaired the damage, but it needs some touch-up work.  While the glue is setting, I also found that the Redstone actually had "US ARMY" on all four sides, so I've added two more insignia.  I do have the labels for the boosters printed and glued to the base stands, so that is done.  I'll have everything completed by tomorrow, with luck.

Gary

Today In Space History:

1956 July 23 - .

  • X-2 Flight 13 - . Crew: Everest. Payload: X-2 # 1 flight 13. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Everest. Class: Manned. Type: Manned rocketplane. Spacecraft Bus: XS-1. Spacecraft: X-2 . Ninth powered flight, Lt. Col. Frank K. Everest (USAF) flew the Bell X-2 rocket-powered research plane at a record speed of Mach 2.87, ust over 1,900 mph, at 20,802 m..


1971 July 23 - .

  • M2 Flight 23 - . Crew: Dana. Payload: M2-F3 flight 7. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Dana. Program: NASA Lifting Body. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Spacecraft Bus: M2-F2. Spacecraft: M2-F3. Maximum Speed - 788 kph. Maximum Altitude - 18440 m. Flight Time - 353 sec..


1975 July 23 - .

  • Apollo (ASTP) in-flight experiments - . Nation: USA. Program: ASTP. Flight: Apollo (ASTP).

    Some minor experiment hardware problems developed during the final days of the mission, but for the most part the crew members worked through their flight plan - which included 23 independent experiments - with few difficulties. After a relatively quiet day of work on the 22nd, the major part of the 23rd was devoted to preparing for and conducting the doppler tracking experiment (MA-089). The day was also marked by a press conference from space and jettison of the docking module.

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, July 23, 2019 6:11 PM

Thanks Mach71, no big deal. Just had to get that off my chest.

 

I'm mostly done, was hoping I could get the photos posted today but the landing leg won't stand up. It needs a little time for the cement to set so it looks like I'm going to have to wait till tomorrow. Still hoping to beat the deadline.

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Tuesday, July 23, 2019 4:42 PM

Well thats annoying! Sucks.

But glad to hear you are almost done.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, July 23, 2019 8:58 AM

I sprayed the astronaut with matte finish last night. Hopefully I can get everything assembled and photographed this evening. 

 

I drove over an hour to the D-Day Memorial Sat. When I got there the lady in the gift shop told me they'd canceled due to the heat. So I turned around and drove back home. Two and a half hours round trip and a quarter of a tank of gas wasted for nothing since nobody in the friggin' club can take five mins. to send a friggin' email. I would have been done by now but I didn't want anything to do with modeling Sat. so it took me to Sun. to finish up painting. Angry 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, July 22, 2019 10:12 PM

Gamera>  Happy to see you survived the D-Day Memorial!  Look forward to seeing the Apollo astronaut all put together.  Should be neat!

Update:  Managed to get some flags on the capsules today, and printed out some labels for the stands.  I want to give the boosters a coating of glosscoat, then dullcoat certain parts.  Should be ready for final inspection tomorrow.  If Gamera gets the astronaut done, we can wrap this GB up in style.  Hopefully, the chutes all open!

All systems look nominal for re-entry.

Mission Director (GAF)

Today In Space History:

1969 July 22 - . Launch Vehicle: N1.

  • Soviet post-mortems after Apollo 11 - . Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Afanasyev, Sergei, Glushko, Keldysh, Kuznetsov, Mishin, Ustinov. Program: Lunar L3.

    Two sequential N1 failures could not just be blamed on the poor reliability of the first stage. It was apparent that, compared to the Americans, both the management and the development practices of the Soviet space programme were inferior to the Americans. Politically there was no consensus within the Soviet state of the need for a space programme. Glushko and Ustinov waged a perpetual struggle against Afanasyev, Keldysh, and Mishin. RVSN Commander Kirillov wrote a letter to Smirnov on behalf of Afanasyev on the root causes of the failures. His faction believed these were the continued use of artillery/military rocket development practices for large, complex systems. These outdated practices required 20 to 60 flight tests to achieve reliability before a rocket could be put into production.


1969 July 22 - .

  • Apollo 11 heads back to earth. - . Nation: USA. Flight: Apollo 11.

    The CSM was injected into a trajectory toward the earth at 12:55 a.m. EDT July 22. Following a midcourse correction at 4:01 p.m., an 18-minute color television transmission was made, in which the astronauts demonstrated the weightlessness of food and water and showed shots of the earth and the moon.


1972 July 22 - .

  • Venera 8 Venus Landing - . Nation: Russia.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, July 22, 2019 9:36 AM

Hey Gary great job on the boosters and looking forward to seeing them with all the lettering in place. Great group build- thank you!!! Bow Down

 

The astronaut is done. Hopefully I'll be able to the final matte coat on him and the base tonight and assemble them. I'm hoping for photos Tuesday evening - the 23rd.

Mach71: Congrads on picking up your own astronaut. Not a bad kit, not bad at all. Just was a pain getting the two halvies of the body to line up. And make sure the decals aren't stuck to the plastic bag. I tore two of mine trying to get them separated. Probably should replace the decals but it's hard to see the damage without looking closely. One decal ripped to shreds trying to get it loose, I just left it off, not sure anyone would notice unless they're really familar with the suit.  

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, July 22, 2019 12:10 AM

Steve, thanks!  They're probably a bit rough considering how much I've had to correct and their size.  I'm continuing on to the finishi, however!

Update:  A small update on what I've managed to accomplish today.  I found that the rub-on dry transfer letters were too large for the "United States" decals on the side of the Gemini capsule, and while the white decal lettering was about the right size, the prospect of applying each of those tiny (tiny) letters to the sides of the capsule just made me shiver!  So I went with the same method I used for the Mercury capsule and used the decals I had printed on clear decal paper with a painted white background.  They're drying now and I'll touch up the capsule with black paint later.  They look okay, though nothing ot write home about (or call Mission Control).  I need some very small American flags next, so I'll see what I can do about printing those (preferably on white decal paper).

Will work on the signs for the boosters later so I can get this thing finished up.

Hope Gamera survived his D-Day Memorial weekend!  Heat was pretty intense across the nation.

Till later.

Gary

Today In Space History:

1961 July 21 - . 12:20 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC5. LV Family: Redstone. Launch Vehicle: Redstone MRLV.

  • Mercury MR-4 - . Call Sign: Liberty Bell 7. Crew: Grissom. Backup Crew: Glenn. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Glenn, Grissom. Agency: NASA. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Mercury MR-4. Spacecraft: Mercury. Duration: 0.0108 days. Apogee: 189 km (117 mi).

    The Mercury capsule, Liberty Bell 7, manned by Astronaut Virgil I. Grissom, boosted by a Redstone rocket, reached a peak altitude of 190.3 km and a speed of 8,335 km per hour. After a flight of 15 minutes and 37 seconds, the landing was made 487 km downrange from the launch site. The hatch blew while still in water, and the capsule sank; Grissom saved, though his suit was filling up with water through open oxygen inlet lines.

    This was the second and final manned suborbital Mercury Redstone flight, and the first flight with trapezoidal window. Further suborbital flights (each astronaut was to make one as a training exercise) were cancelled. An attempt to recover the capsule in very deep water in 1994 not successful. It was finally raised in the summer of 1999.


1966 July 21 - .

  • Landing of Gemini 10 - . Return Crew: Collins, Young. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Collins, Young. Flight: Gemini 10. Spacecraft: Gemini.

    The retrofire maneuver was initiated at 70 hours 10 minutes after liftoff, during the 43rd revolution. The spacecraft landed at 21:06 GMT within sight of the prime recovery ship, the aircraft carrier Guadalcanal, some 5 km from the planned landing point on July 21.


 

1969 July 21 - .


 

1973 July 21 - . 19:30 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC81/23. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton-K/D.

  • Mars 4 - . Payload: M-73 s/n 52S. Mass: 4,650 kg (10,250 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: MOM. Program: Mars. Class: Mars. Type: Mars probe. Spacecraft Bus: 4MV. Spacecraft: Mars M-73. USAF Sat Cat: 6742 . COSPAR: 1973-047A.

    Failed; did not enter Martian orbit as planned; intended to be a Mars orbiter mission. Mars 4 reached Mars on 10 February 1974. Due to use of helium in preflight tests of the computer chips, which resulted in degradation of the chips during the voyage to Mars, the retro-rockets never fired to slow the craft into Mars orbit. Mars 4 flew by the planet at a range of 2,200 km. It returned one swath of pictures and some radio occultation data. Final heliocentric orbit 1.02 x 1.63 AU, 2.2 degree inclination, 556 day period.


1975 July 21 - .

  • ASTP - Soyuz returns to earth, Apollo remains in orbit. - . Nation: Russia. Program: ASTP. Flight: Apollo (ASTP), Soyuz 19 (ASTP).

    Following a rest period of nearly 10 hours, the Soyuz crewmen advised the ground that they were awake and that all systems were normal. The deorbit burn came exactly on time (5:09 in Houston), and the Soyuz crew landed safely in Kazakhstan. For the remaining three and a half days, Stafford, Slayton, and Brand would concentrate on their experiments, but in many respects the saga of Apollo and Soyuz had come to an end.


1998 July 21 - .  

  • Death of Alan Bartlett Jr 'Al' Shepard - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Shepard.

    American test pilot astronaut 1959-1974. First American in space. Grounded on medical grounds during Gemini, but reinstated, becoming fifth person to walk on the moon. Millionaire entrepreneur on the side. 2 spaceflights, 9.0 days in space. Flew suborbital on Mercury MR-3 and to the moon on Apollo 14 (1971). Died of leukemia, two years after diagnosis.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Saturday, July 20, 2019 11:41 PM

They look fantastic Gary.

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, July 20, 2019 10:56 PM

Update:

The AMT boosters are almost done.  Here's what they look like now.

I managed to get the "United States" decals on the Mercury capsule after painting the underside white.  I accidentally printed them on clear decal paper.  They turned out okay.

I received the white lettering I ordered today, and used the decals for the "US ARMY" on the Redstone.  That looks great!  The white lettering has a size so tiny that I'm going to try to put "United States" on the Gemini capsule using them.  The problem is that they're so tiny!  If it doesn't work well, I'll drop back to what I did on the Mercury capsule.  Meanwhile, I need to make some labels for each rocket to paste on the base.  I'll give them a coating of gloss coat after I get things together.

Hope this will be finished completely in a couple of days.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, July 20, 2019 2:12 PM

Mach71, Modelcrazy, Bakster>  Thanks for the kind words, guys, and thanks to all for participating in this group build.  It's been a wild ride, but enjoyed all the ups and downs.  Smile

I've extended the end date just a few days until the 24th to help get a couple of things done, but don't expect to extend it any further.  One thing I've learned, a GB takes up a lot of time!

I want to thank Steve for agreeing to co-host this GB and am glad he didn't have to do much.  I had some rough times with my health in December and January, so I'm glad he was there... just in case!

I'm attempting to finish up some decals for the boosters, but I am a bit distracted by all the stuff related to the moon landing.  Brings back a lot of memories.

I listed this site under the FSM general thread, but if you want to listen to the Apollo lunar landing transcripts in "real time", you can head over to "Apollo 11 in Real Time" to hear the voice communications between Houston and the Apollo spacecraft.  Really incredible!

https://apolloinrealtime.org/11/

At this time, 50 years ago, the lunar module was on the back side of the moon preparing for the landing.

I should have an update later this evening on the boosters.  Good luck, and God speed!

Gary

Today In Space History:

"Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle Has Landed." 

1969 July 20 - .

  • Apollo 11 achieves first landing of humans on the moon - . Nation: USA. Flight: Apollo 11.

    At 8:50 a.m. July 20, Armstrong and Aldrin reentered the LM and checked out all systems. They performed a maneuver at 1:11 p.m. to separate the LM from the CSM and began the descent to the moon. The LM touched down on the moon at 4:18 p.m. EDT July 20. Armstrong reported to mission control at MSC, "Houston, Tranquillity Base here - the Eagle has landed."

    For the next 10 minutes Armstrong and Aldrin were occupied with several post-landing procedures, reconfiguring switches and systems. Armstrong found time to report to Mission Control what he had been too busy to tell them during the landing: that he had manually flown the lunar module over the rockstrewn crater where the automatic landing system was taking it. Then he made his first quick-look science report:

    "We'll get to the details of what's around here, but it looks like a collection of just about every variety of shape, angularity, granularity, about every variety of rock you could find. . . . There doesn't appear to be too much of a general color at all. However, it looks as though some of the rocks and boulders, of which there are quite a few in the near area, it looks as though they're going to have some interesting colors to them. . . . "

    After giving Houston as many clues as he could to the location of their module, he added some more description:

    "The area out the left-hand window is a relatively level plain cratered with a fairly large number of craters of the 5- to 50-foot variety, and some ridges - small, 20, 30 feet high, I would guess, and literally thousands of little 1- and 2-foot craters around the area. We see some angular blocks out several hundred feet in front of us that are probably 2 feet in size and have angular edges. There is a hill in view, just about on the ground track ahead of us. Difficult to estimate, but might be half a mile or a mile. "

    Armstrong and Aldrin then started preparing their spacecraft for takeoff, setting up critical systems to be ready in case something happened and they had to leave the lunar surface quickly. A short break in this activity gave Armstrong a chance to pass along more information about the landing site:

    ". . . The local surface is very comparable to that we observed from orbit at this sun angle, about 10 degrees sun angle, or that nature. It's pretty much without color. It's . . . a very white, chalky gray, as you look into the zero-phase line [directly toward the sun]; and it's considerably darker gray, more like . . . ashen gray as you look out 90 degrees to the sun. Some of the surface rocks in close here that have been fractured or disturbed by the rocket engine plume are coated with this light gray on the outside; but where they've been broken, they display a dark, very dark gray interior; and it looks like it could be country basalt. "

    Setting up the spacecraft systems took another hour and a half to complete; then they were ready to get out and explore. The flight plan called for them to eat and then rest for four hours, but Aldrin called Mission Control to recommend starting their surface exploration in about three hours' time. Houston concurred. Although they had been awake almost 11 hours and had gone through some stressful moments during the landing, it seemed too much to expect the first men on the moon to take a nap before they made history.

    While Armstrong and Aldrin tended to their postlanding chores, Mike Collins, orbiting 60 nautical miles (112 kilometers) overhead in the command module Columbia, had little to do. Houston enlisted his aid in an attempt to locate Eagle, giving him the best map coordinates they could derive from the sketchy information available. With his navigational sextant Collins scanned several spots, without success; Columbia passed over the landing site too rapidly to allow him to search the area thoroughly and he never found the lunar module. Determination of its exact location had to wait for postmission analysis of Armstrong's descriptions of the area and examination of the spacecraft's landing trajectory.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, July 20, 2019 9:23 AM

Yeah I echo the other comments. It was a very sucessfull GB, and it was particularly enjoyable to me not only for the people and great builds, but also because having grown up in that era of early space exploration it has brought back some good memories. Those years were turmultuous for this country, but the space program seemed to give people a little bit of hope, awe, and something to feel good about.

Thanks again guys.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Saturday, July 20, 2019 8:46 AM

Ditto

Thank you Gary for the Group Build. I wasn't much of a co-host since you had the controls much of the flight. I was needed when the log-on snafu happend but other than that, not much. Kinda like a Vice Presedent, just there in case of an emergency.

The builds were great and fun to watch. I was in a hury to get my SV done before I had to move so I didn't get the rest of the kit done, Oh well, maybe build the S1B in a later space GB....I still need to hang the SV up in the hobby room.

11 builds, wow. That's what I call successful! Yes

It was great to work with all of you and excited to see most of you in my ships GB.

See ya'll round the forums.

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Saturday, July 20, 2019 8:01 AM

Happy moon landing day!

 

Gamera and Gary, 

Good luck getting the last kits done, They both are looking great so far.

 

Gamera, I picked up the Apollo astronaut from eBay. It got delivered from the UK last week, it's the RG re-pop. It looks to be a good kit. Hopefully I'll get around to it soon.

 

Thanks again everyone for making this GB a very enjoyable one! And thanks to our leader, Gary, for running it and all the space trivia! Thanks also to modelcrazy for stepping up and being the vice! 

11 completed kits (it will be 13) not a bad group build!

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, July 19, 2019 11:15 PM

In commemoration of the Apollo 11 moon landing, here are some more bubblegum cards depicting the astronauts on the lunar surface.

For all mankind.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, July 19, 2019 11:02 PM

Gamera>  Aside from the decal problems, he's looking very good!  Hope things will work out, apart from having to eat more Rolos!   I guess you can just use white or clear glue to attach the figure and landing leg until you decide to redo the base.  Just remember I've extended the mission until the 24th, so you've got a few extra days in the "main" GB.  I may need those myself!

Update:  I have been working on decals for the capsules today, and although I accidently printed them on "clear" decal paper instead of "white", I'm pleased as I may have discovered (again by accident) that spraying a layer of Dullcoat onto the decal paper before printing actually improves the tiny print quality.  I suppose it may be that it gives the ink a better gripping surface.  I don't know if this is true, but it will be the path that I follow from now on.  I should have them ready by tomorrow evening, but I don't know if I will be able to get a final coating of finish on the boosters by then.

About the new "The Right Stuff" series, I note that one of the producers will be Lenard DiCaprio, so I'm not exactly holding out high hopes.  Not to mention they would have to work very hard to top the soundtrack for the movie!  We'll see how it goes.

Watching Apollo specials on the DVR.  Lots of stuff.  Smile

Gary

Today In Space History:

1950 July 19 - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral. Launch Vehicle: V-2.

  • First attempted launch from Cape Canaveral. - . Payload: WAC-Corporal. Nation: USA. Related Persons: von Braun. Program: Bumper. Class: Technology. Type: Navigation technology satellite. Pad abort on 19 July of Bumper No. 8, a German V-2 with a 320 kg Army-JPL Wac Corporal. Launch scrubbed first due to emergency landing of aircraft in the range; second attempt, no lift, main chamber did not ignite..


1963 July 19 - . 18:20 GMT - . Launch Site: Edwards. Launch Complex: Smith Ranch Lake DZ. Launch Pad: Edwards RW04/22. Launch Platform: NB-52 008.

  • X-15A VO,UVP,IR,HS,Balloon Test/Technology/Ultraviolet Astronomy mission - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA, USAF. Spacecraft: X-15A. Apogee: 106 km (65 mi).

    Maximum Speed - 5969 kph. Maximum Altitude - 106010 m. Astronaut wings flight. 80 cm diameter balloon dragged on 30 m line to measure air density. First X-15 astronaut flight (FAI definition); fourth astronaut wings flight (USAF definition). Air dropped in Smith Ranch Lake DZ.


1965 July 19 - .

  • Eight KC-135 aircraft and three ships for communications during Apollo flights - . Nation: USA. Program: Apollo.

    NASA was acquiring eight KC-135 aircraft and three ships to help maintain communications during Apollo moon flights. In addition, two ships of the existing DOD instrumentation fleet were being remodeled for support of the Apollo lunar mission's reentry phase. The KC-135 jet transports would be used during reentry to combat the effects of the plasma sheath blackout which had drowned out communications on previous manned launchings. In addition, three primary ground stations were being prepared at Goldstone, Calif.; Canberra, Australia; and Madrid, Spain.


1966 July 19 - . 21:44 GMT - .

  • EVA Gemini 10-1 - . Crew: Collins. EVA Duration: 0.0347 days. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Collins. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Gemini 10. Spacecraft: Gemini. Stand-Up External Vehicular Activity. Photographed earth and stars..


1975 July 19 - .

  • ASTP - Joint Apollo/Soyuz flight activities - . Nation: USA. Program: ASTP. Flight: Apollo (ASTP), Soyuz 19 (ASTP).

    During day five of the flight, the crews concentrated on docking exercises and experiments that involved the two ships in the undocked mode. During the interval between the first undocking and the second docking, the Apollo crew placed its craft between Soyuz and the sun so that the diameter of the service module formed a disk which blocked out the sun. This artificial solar eclipse, as viewed from Soyuz, permitted Leonov and Kubasov to photograph the solar corona.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Friday, July 19, 2019 10:50 AM

Gamera
Dang I'm going to have to buy more chocolate candy... Bakster, I am going to raid that bag on your Jeep for more Rollos..... 

 

It is looking good from here, Gam!

And hey--I just checked the Rolos--they are melted into one big gooey mess. It's that desert heat man. Chomp chomp.  No, really, they are all melted. Chomp chomp.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, July 19, 2019 8:34 AM

A new series based on 'The Right Stuff' sounds pretty cool! Love the movie, love the book, hope the new series is good. 

Sorry to say not much done, it's been so humid and muggy I haven't felt like doing much of anything. I'm still hoping that though I'll miss the 20th deadline I'll still be done by early next week. 

I put on a few of the decals. Which were a pain, the adhesive had glued them to the plastic bag. I carefully peeled them away but it did tear part out of the NASA logo. It had yellowed too, thankfully for the flags I was able to cut off the clear area so they don't show it. Wish now I'd cut the NASA logo closer too. 

 

The base, this is my second attempt. I'm still not totally happy with it but I think I'm going to use it for the deadline. I should be able to pull the landing leg and the figure off and repaint it in the future.

 

And ran out of foil for the landing leg. Dang I'm going to have to buy more chocolate candy... Bakster, I am going to raid that bag on your Jeep for more Rollos..... 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

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