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75th Anniversary of 1944 Group Build (World at War)

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  • Member since
    May 2019
Posted by Galatians 2:16 on Wednesday, June 26, 2019 4:41 PM

John 3:16 KJV
Nice! I’ve got a Buffalo kit, too; but I’m not starting it yet. It’s in my “baby stash”..... :)
 

 

KJV, I like that term “baby stash”. 

-Snail

 Snail

  • Member since
    April 2019
  • From: Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Posted by John 3:16 KJV on Wednesday, June 26, 2019 4:44 PM
Thank you, Galatians!

     “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

     For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.”  - John 3:16-17

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Wednesday, June 26, 2019 6:30 PM

KJV:  that will make a nice base.  Wood grain is very attractive.

Est. 1961:  Looking good.  I like the appearance of those "chunky" little planes like the Wildcat and Buffalo.

Galatians:  the wiring certainly enhances the engine.  Paintwork looks great, too.

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Wednesday, June 26, 2019 6:38 PM

After dabbling around since January with some other projects, I got back to USS Iowa for this build.

First thing after working on the hull and decks is an ocean base.  I found a nice tutorial online about making "water" out of aluminum foil.  I shaped a wake out of foil, too, then sprayed it with acrylic primer.

Eventually, I'll get around to painting it with various blues from craft paint.

Here's how the hull fits into it.

Most of the parts are cleaned up and ready for painting.  I store them, according to the assembly steps, in these plastic boxes that lunch meats come in.

Yesterday I started painting the hull, only to find there was a piece of fuzz caught between the hull and the water-line plate.  Now I have to wait till the paint is fully dry before I sand off the flaw and start repainting.

Fortunately, there are enough other parts to keep on painting until I can get back to the hull.

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2019
  • From: Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Posted by John 3:16 KJV on Wednesday, June 26, 2019 8:19 PM

Thanks, Check. That is unfortunate about the fuzz!

     “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

     For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.”  - John 3:16-17

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Thursday, June 27, 2019 1:11 PM

Thanks, KJV.  I'm sure it'll fix up OK.

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May 2019
Posted by Galatians 2:16 on Saturday, June 29, 2019 3:00 PM

checkmateking02

KJV:  that will make a nice base.  Wood grain is very attractive.

Est. 1961:  Looking good.  I like the appearance of those "chunky" little planes like the Wildcat and Buffalo.

Galatians:  the wiring certainly enhances the engine.  Paintwork looks great, too.

 

Thanks. I really can’t wait to get it done. Any suggestions for further detailing my engine? I am interested in applying a wash of some sort to replicate oil. Thanks again.Snail

checkmateking02: Lookin good! 

 Snail

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Saturday, June 29, 2019 6:26 PM

Thanks, Galatians.

As for engine detailing, since I stick with 1/72, I don't do any.  But here's a system for painting radial engines.

1.  paint it black; I like to use a very dark gray (like Colorcoats "tyre black")

2.  drybrush with steel

3.  drybrush with rust

4.  drybrush with gray over the center gearbox, or whatever that thing is where the prop comes through

5.  light drybrush with silver

6.  overall black wash, using true black

The procedure originated with a member of the forum called "OWL," who hasn't been around lately.

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May 2019
Posted by Galatians 2:16 on Monday, July 1, 2019 8:00 PM

Gee that’s great checkmateking! Thanks! Snail

 Snail

  • Member since
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  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Tuesday, July 2, 2019 2:55 PM

You're welcome.  Hope it works well for you.

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
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Posted by Galatians 2:16 on Friday, July 5, 2019 12:13 AM

Happy Independence Day, everyone!SnailHappy Birthdayto America!

 Snail

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Friday, July 5, 2019 8:52 AM

Ditto

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
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  • From: Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Posted by John 3:16 KJV on Friday, July 12, 2019 9:19 PM

So some interior parts went in, and there were no parts for the seatbelts. 

I improvised using tin foil painted tan... 

I also glued together the gear struts.... 

     “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

     For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.”  - John 3:16-17

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Saturday, July 13, 2019 9:37 AM

Looking good, KJV.  I hadn't thought of using foil for seatbelts.  Nice idea.  I've always used masking tape when I need to.

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2019
  • From: Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Posted by John 3:16 KJV on Saturday, July 13, 2019 10:35 PM

Thank you, check. Yes

     “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

     For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.”  - John 3:16-17

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2017
Posted by Armor_Aficionado on Sunday, July 14, 2019 12:56 PM
Actually, no, the Red Army first entered Poland on Sept. 17, 1939. If you remember, our illustrious "allies," the Soviets, first allied themselves with Hitler and in the secret protocol to the Ribbentrop-Molotov pact, agreed that they would invade Poland from the east. I know the Poles have never forgotten this.

  • Member since
    May 2019
Posted by Galatians 2:16 on Wednesday, July 17, 2019 9:34 PM

Good for Poland to not forget.Snail

 Snail

  • Member since
    May 2019
Posted by Galatians 2:16 on Saturday, July 20, 2019 3:47 PM

Armor_Aficionado: Just out of curiosity, do you know if there were any Polish aircraft in the war during 1943-1945? Thanks.Snail

 Snail

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Saturday, July 20, 2019 6:41 PM

Galatians 2:16

Armor_Aficionado: Just out of curiosity, do you know if there were any Polish aircraft in the war during 1943-1945? Thanks.Snail

 

Only those flying with the RAF and the Communist forces. If you mean Polish built, what they had were mostly destroyed in 1939.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Dragon 1/35th Tiger I/AMT STAP with Battle Droid

  • Member since
    May 2019
Posted by Galatians 2:16 on Tuesday, July 23, 2019 4:13 PM

Bish

 

 
Galatians 2:16

Armor_Aficionado: Just out of curiosity, do you know if there were any Polish aircraft in the war during 1943-1945? Thanks.Snail

 

 

 

Only those flying with the RAF and the Communist forces. If you mean Polish built, what they had were mostly destroyed in 1939.

 

Thanks, Armor_Aficionado.Snail   

 Snail

  • Member since
    May 2019
Posted by Galatians 2:16 on Saturday, July 27, 2019 12:16 PM

Hey not sure if I should post this here, but may I ask how to get this group build’s tag for my signature (I think that’s where it goes)? Could any of you guys please help me? Thanks.Snail  

 Snail

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Saturday, July 27, 2019 3:34 PM

Galatians 2:16

Hey not sure if I should post this here, but may I ask how to get this group build’s tag for my signature (I think that’s where it goes)? Could any of you guys please help me? Thanks.Snail  

 

You have to save it to your computer then add it to your hosting site the same as the build pics you post. You can then edit your sig and add it.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Dragon 1/35th Tiger I/AMT STAP with Battle Droid

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Sunday, July 28, 2019 12:03 PM

Ditto

What Bish said!

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    February 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Friday, August 2, 2019 12:19 AM

 

OK: let's call the SU-76 a wrap.

 

 su76m_3 by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 SuActR by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 lftvig!! by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 

Tamiya 1/35 SU-76

 

Paints: Golden High Flow acrylics, Vallejo Model Color, Mission Model acrylics

 

Weathering: Iwata Com.Art paints; Vallejo acrylic washes, Vallejo acrylic Terrain Effects, Sennelier and Gamblin pigments.

 

Base: Sculptamold, Blick matte acrylics, Blick & Liqutex acrylic mediums, Golden Self-Levelling Gloss Gel, W&S Static Grass.

 

 

The vehicle: The SU-76 was an excellent example of the Soviet ability to get good “bang for the buck” out of their weapons. It was based on the T-70 light tanks – a variation on a British design from Vickers- that was one of the most numerous of the ocean of light armor thrown at the Wehrmacht in 1941. Miserably handled these obsolete vehicles (although certainly superior to the PzwII) were knocked out in huge numbers, They did, however inflict serious losses on the Germans throughout the campaign. The Soviets rarely threw things away, and T-70s and BT-7s (upon which the T-34 was based) were found in front line service through Kursk. That said, it was obvious by 1942 that the light tank could not live up to pre-war hopes of using a swarm of fast and small tanks to exploit break-outs and accomplish “Deep Battle.” But the factories were there, and the T-70 had very limited material and manpower requirements. Thus the Soviet engineers building the T-70 argued that it would be possible to eliminate the turret and put on the redoubtable 76mm Soviet dual purpose gun. The fighting compartment had to be in the rear to mount the gun. The vehicle had a crew of 4. It weighed in at just over 10 tons. It was found very useful from the outset in 1943 and production was pushed. In one form or another it was used until the mid-50s by Soviet and Soviet bloc armies. Most were used for ground support as the armor had little value against any anti-tank gun, but if needed the SU-76 could engage any German tank this side of a Tiger. Some 13,000 SU-76s were produced, making it the second most heavily produced Soviet AFV during WWII. And because they were reliable and easy to move around, large numbers exist in museums and at war memorials. The SU-76 showed that any AFV was dangerous in the right place, even one that was petit. Compare my SU-76 with an earlier IS-2 built in the same 1/35 scale:

 

 2tanks by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 

The context: The big news in 1944 on the Eastern Front was the astounding Soviet mauling of German Army Group Center during Operation Bagration (June 23 – August 19, 1944). Bagration was the most complex and operationally impressive Soviet campaign during the war. Because of the size of Bagration and the existence of other Soviet actions, it's not easy to determine exactly how many men were committed and how high were German losses. Figure Soviet manpower at 2.25 million, supported by 4,000 tanks, 8,000 planes and a few zillion artillery tubes. German AG Center was robbed of much of its strength because Hitler feared that the Soviets would continue their drive into the Balkans in the South, and try to knock out Finland in the north. (And the pesky allies were on land in Normandy.) Furthermore, AG Center intelligence believed a major blow would come from south of the salient. Instead the Soviets built up a huge force with the utmost secrecy- greatly aided by a major offensive by partisans. When the attack came it was aimed at the front and north of the salient – which proved poorly defended. Although the operation was commanded by a roll call of Soviet blue chip generals (and they were good, if a bit free with presenting huge butcher bills) like Zukov, Konev and Vassilevsky, the real guru of this masterpiece was Konstanty Rokossovsky. Rokossovsky was born in Czarist Poland and later complained that the Russians thought he was Polish and the Poles considered him Russian. Stalin almost killed him during the purges, but only threw him into the Gulag. Rokossovsky had developed a brilliant record during the 30s and was identified with “Deep Battle” armor enthusiasts – whose leader was Marshall Tukhachevsky whose purge was one of the first of the 1937 debacle. Although tortured and beaten Rokossovsky refused to sign a confession. That actually was a good strategy. He was released in May 1940 without comment and reassigned at very high rank. He fought with tenacity and brains during the Battle of Moscow, Stalingrad and Kursk. By 1944 Stalin declared Rokossovsky to be his “favorite general.” Might have been true – Stalin allowed Rokossovsky to split his attacking forces at the beginning of Bargration only after a personal guarantee from the general that a deviation from doctrine would work.

 

 

Work it did. Bagration was the archetype example of Soviet “Deep Battle” - a series of staged and massive blows designed to confuse the defense and penetrate the line at several points. Expecting breakthrough, immediate reinforcement was preplanned and allowed the operation to move forward with great speed and at great depth. In the first 72 hours of the attack, huge holes were blown in the German lines in several places (one of the largest leading to Rokossovky's rapid encirclement of Minsk) and a general advance within a week. In four weeks the Soviets inflicted twice the casualties on the Germans and seized twice the area as they had done in four months at Stalingrad. By the end of August, the Red Army was on the Vistula, had taken most of the Baltic states, were creating the Kourland debacle, and had crossed the borders of Romania, Hungary and Slovakia. The attack wasn't impressive simply because of the territory seized. The advanced had unhinged German position on the Eastern Front almost totally. AG Center was gone. AG South (or its equivalent) was shoved away from the center and toward the south. AG North was close to encirclement and also shoved away from the center toward the north. In short, the Germans would never have a significant line in the East after June 1944. There might be one on paper, but because the FeldHerr had been dislocated it was almost impossible for units from one part of the front to aid another. Indeed, because Bagration was fought over such a large area and achieved so much success, there was no single geographic point – like Moscow, Stalingrad or Berlin, that gave a kind of coherence to the campaign. It's easier to grasp that Sixth Army was surrounded at Stalingrad, or Berlin was captured by the Reds then the Soviet offensive of early summer 1944 demolished the entire German position on the Eastern Front. So, ironically, Bagration was probably too big, too decisive to be readily understood and remembered by many casual students of the Great Patriotic War. Whatever the case, after August 1944, there was one lopsided Soviet victory after another. Obviously these victories led to Berlin. They also put Red forces deep into the Balkans and Eastern Europe. Add to this debacle the collapse of the German Army in the West in August 1944, and German defeat was only a matter of months. (That didn't mean that the violence was over. The period August 44 – May 45 was probably the worst in the ETO with every army suffering appalling losses even when every German private knew the war was over. Lord.)

 

 

Rokossovky's portion of Bagration included a major attack out of the norther portion of the Pripet Marshes (often called Pinsk Marshes). This is a vast marshy lowland that follows along the Pripet River (a tributary of the Dnieper) and lies between Kiev and Minsk. There are few roads, and terrain varies between difficult to nearly impassable. During both world wars the Marshes divided the Russian front between north and south. During Barbarossa, German AG Center attacked north of the Marshes, AG South to its south. Germans rarely went into the marshes, but it was one base for partisan activity. Rokossovsky went to great lengths to hide his build up along the northern fringe of the marshes, and this helped amplify surprise. According to Wikipedia – and I'd not quibble – the SU-76 was widely deployed on this sector because it was light enough to negotiate the soggy ground that would not support T-34s. (Thousands of Soviet infantry built rafts, making it a kind of Roman Empire amphibious operation..) So I decided the northern Pripet Marshes would be a good place to stick my rendition of the SU-76. Today the area is a favorite location for Euro eco-tourists (think of it as the Everglades without the alligators). Here's a typical pic of the terrain:

 

 Marshes by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

So I let my imagination travel a bit. I wanted soggy terrain with water over some of the surface. I assumed that Soviet engineers would try to improve some tracks through the area to enhance movement. I was making a vignette here. But what to do with the four man crew? I haven't mastered figures, so I put the crew in a tent. I don't think this is far off. For one thing several pics show SU-76s with large tarps attached. And where would the crew sleep? Only the driver could fit inside, the rest is engine. I suppose the crew could have covered the compartment, and slept in back, but the fit would have been beastly. So let's give them a tent – lots of armies have used them. I made a simple one out of card stock and linen/paper towel and the size is pretty good I think for four – they could have sat up to play cards and drink vodka. (Red Army soldiers got vodka like Nelson's sailors got their rum.) I don't see them sleeping under the tank, especially on damp ground. And unless the Pripet Marshes are completely different than marshes in Minnesota, I'd be thinking of clouds of mosquitoes in early summer. Anyway, the base material is PVC – it bent just a bit, which PVC should not do, so it might be plasterboard. The main material is Sculptamold, a paper mache like material that's great for dios. I mixed it with inexpensive Blick matte acrylic paints. On the upper portion I put on a smoother section of Blick gloss acrylic mixed with a darker brown and gravel in the mix and on top of it. (I had good luck on my camera settings on this model, and most of the colors are pretty accurate. For some reason the gravel on the road appears too light than it is – it's actually hard to see. I also put some Vallejo Mud/Grass Terrain Effects underneath the vehicle and behind it. Note that there aren't very prominent track markings on the road. This is another interesting argument by the fine German YouTube modeler Hamalkar Barkas who claims that tracks were rarely clear like footprints: tanks were made to apportion weight over a wide area and what you got was more of fuzzy trail than very clear track marks in the mud. Hamalkar also argues, correctly I think, that tools on AFVs were painted camo colors and not wood/metal etc. I try to emulate the real, so I followed suit. Obviously you get more visual interest if you paint tools differently. Mine were actually chipped over hairspray, but it's hard to see after the pigments.) I tried to emulate low lying water in the lower left. I dusted all of the ground with pigments and created some depressions with a spoon. I put Golden Self Levelling Clear Gel in the depressions and it dried very nicely. In between the puddles I put on some static grass with my little electric applicator. Unfortunately I didn't have longer static grass – I was sure I did, but, nope. You can get a pretty good view of the water and the base here:

 

 tentwatdet by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 lftvig by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

I used the Wilder style “layering” weathering techniques on the vehicle except everything I used was acrylic or pigments. I didn't use enamels because I don't like them at all although I don't doubt their quality. I also didn't use oils – just to see how well I could push the acrylics and pigments. In future I will go back to oil works – indeed, if I ever figure out proper oil “rendering” I might do an entire weathering with oils and pigments. I try to do something different in every build. It makes it more fun (usually) but might prevent ever coming up with a solid build sequence that would lead to better models. Good excuse anyway. Regardless, I did washes and filters almost entirely with Iwata Com.Art paints. They're very hard to describe if you haven't used them. They have several transparent colors and a kind of grainy texture which I really like for smudging and streaking. I added gloss varnish to an oil color Com.Art and used it on fuel caps. BTW: for rust I really like Metal Effects which is a kind of bottled rust. I use very little rust except on the exhaust. Here's another case of war being the enemy of art. WWII vehicles weren't out there long to pick up a lot of rust. I'm sure it was there, but not often in large quantity. A good dose of rust adds to visual interest, but I'm not sold on the historic accuracy. (Someone like Mig Jimenez would say to hell with accuracy, and he might be right.) I'm also not sure how much real chipping took place, but I applied quite a few. They're often hard to distinguish from the occasional splattering of wet pigments I used. I do use a lot of pigments. Whatever real conditions did to real WWII tanks, we can all agree they got dirty, muddy, dusty and, because of frequent rain fall, dirtied, dusted and mudded and smudged again and again. I'd guess a kind of patina appeared quickly. (Soviet paint tended to darken with age – it was also matte and would have picked up dirt like metal fillings to a magnet.) The pigments really are beginning to interest me. I use them raw on a matte surface – no fixer needed or wanted. I use very high quality art house pigments from Sennelier and Gamblin, but products from MIG or Vallejo would work just as well. I began employing them in small dots and then tapping a blunt brush – it's a very interesting effect. I'm using five colors of pigments, but a kind of light gray-brown is the most used. (Much thicker pigments and Vallejo mud appears on the wheels and tracks.) Here are a couple of pics of a properly untidy SU-76 and some detail pics of mine:

 

 SUaction by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 smudgedft by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 rtdet by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 reardet by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 lftrdet by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 topdet by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

Here are some more pics of the SU-76 vignette:

 

 rtftdet by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 rtftvig by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 rtrvig by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 rtvig! by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 abvvig by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 lftrvig by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 lftvig by Eric Bergerud, on Flickr

 

 

Next up a Tamiya Ki-61? Or should I do the USS Bogue? Maybe even the Tamiya A6M3 Zero. We'll see.

 

Eric

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Friday, August 2, 2019 10:43 AM

Excellent review and historical background, Eric.  And outstanding results on the model.  It's an exceptionally realistic piece of artwork.  You captured the look of a very much-used machine, in a difficult terrain.  Well done!

So now, do you have a preference for the finished photo?

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    February 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Friday, August 2, 2019 10:20 PM
The one on the top will do. Wish I'd had more types of grasses to give the base more variety - wonder if anyone makes cattails? Space is a big issue and it's becoming bigger. Dios and vignettes are kind of fun - wonder if trying something in 1/48 wouldn't work. We'll see. Eric

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Friday, August 2, 2019 10:34 PM

Front page is updated with your latest build, Eric.  It's a beauty!

Thanks for being part of the GB.  It's always a pleasure to see your artistry, and to learn the facts you post about the real thing.

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    February 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Saturday, August 3, 2019 12:32 AM
Not sure I'd use "artistry" to describe anything I do. Be glad to live with "ok model." One of the neat thing about this hobby in the internet age is that you can check out the really top tier modelers. The famous guys of the armor world - Mig Jimenez Adam Wilder, Mike Rinaldi - they're all really good. And the winners at AMPS are maybe even better. Or go check out the top guns over at Model Warship - people like Jim Bauman or Chris Flodberg do things that are amazing. Ditto with the WWI biplane fanatics. But even we mortals can have a fine time, and liking history is a plus. (And I make my living writing and teaching military history, so the fit is double good.) And, perhaps most importantly, can you think of a hobby that goes better with listening to music? Except for a very few critical moments, most of modeling leaves at least 50% of you brain unoccupied - just enough to stack the spindle full of Bach and Mozart. Also - my signature is right - model boats are a lot cheaper than real ones.

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    April 2019
  • From: Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Posted by John 3:16 KJV on Monday, August 5, 2019 6:53 PM

Hey, guys! More airbrushing done today...

I masked the lower nose piece with masking tape and Silly Putty, and sprayed olive drab over the unmasked part of the piece; and I gave the main fuselage a repaint. Now, let’s hope, I’m ready for more assembly!

 

     “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

     For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.”  - John 3:16-17

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Monday, August 5, 2019 6:56 PM

Looks good, KJV.  Nice color!

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

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