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75th Anniversary of 1944 Group Build (World at War)

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  • Member since
    March 2015
Posted by Rotorhead13 on Friday, February 8, 2019 5:21 PM

Here's something you all might want to consider, for this GB or just to get one cheap. A 1/35 Horsa glider at less than half price. Don't know how long it will last, but here's the link:   https://modelkitcloseouts.com/collections/featured-closeouts/products/bronco-1-35-airspeed-as51-horsa-glider-kit

 

  • Member since
    October 2009
Posted by JacknewbIII on Friday, February 8, 2019 6:09 PM

The Lightning is coming along. I have all of the filling and sanding done and have attached the canopy and primed. I am trying to figure out how to tackle the finish. I bought some alclad airframe aluminum to try for the first time. Can you pre-shade under an almuminum finish or should I post shade? I am not sure I have ever attempted weathering metal finishes.

I have found that using a headlamp sitting on a desk (facing up) to be the best method of masking my canopies. I figured I would share a few pics of the process for those who are looking for different methods. I just slap a large piece of tamiya tape on it and hold it with my left hand just above the light and I can usually see the lines just fine. Results are not perfect but it does not take much time either. 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Saturday, February 9, 2019 9:30 AM

Rotorhead13

Reply to Checkmateking02 concerning the movie A Bridge Too Far. (Can't seem to get my post to attach to his. Guess I still have things to learn).

Me too! I watch that movie every year or two. Also on my repeat list of war movies is The Longest Day, Patton, Sergeant York, Battleground and possibly the best and most watchable war movie ever: The Great Escape. A few typical movie-industry errors, such as creating characters just so they could squeeze in American actors, but, on the whole, a very worthy tribute to the actual participants.

 

 
All great films, Rotorhead!  Another good one is "The Great Raid."

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Saturday, February 9, 2019 9:33 AM

The P-38 is looking good, Jack.  And that's a nifty little trick for masking.

I've never personally used Alclad, so I don't know how it works.  I always used Floquil's various silvers, until the paint line was discontinued.

Nice work!

 

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    February 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Sunday, February 10, 2019 2:57 AM
I guess the price for the Horsa is pretty reasonable - I don't think any of the others are particularly great deals. I can't see the glider getting into my house - I have serious space problems and a 1/35 glider must be a whopper.

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    February 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Sunday, February 10, 2019 3:06 AM
Talk of P-38s and B-24s. Hobby Boss has just come out with a 1/32 Liberator - huge. But there's a major WWII aircraft without a good model - I've heard nothing but sad tales about the MiniCraft or nothing great about the Hasegawa. The P-38 is another one. I suppose it's big enough for 1/72, but we should have a 1/48 Lightning. It's inherently a very difficult kit to build - pity Tamiya only throws out two jewels a year and the other new companies like Takom and Rye Field see fixated on armor. Listening Airfix? The new Airfix kits (as I'm beginning to learn first hand) are not ideal, but they're pretty good and they make kits that should be out there. (I do want their Wellington - ugly duck but a very important plane.) I wish they'd give the 38 a spin - I'd guess it would sell really well - if it fit together. Eric

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Monday, February 11, 2019 2:50 PM

Checkmateking02,

To be fair, and since I've already used the 1/350 HMS Roberts for another GB, I will not use it  for this one (feels like cheating). The HMS Roberts is already done and has been posted in the Ships as well as GB themes. I found a kit in my stash that will work well for our GB here.

I have decided I am going to build Tamiya's 1/16 Kublewagen Type 82 and include Field Marshall Rommel and his driver (comes in the kit).

Please add this to my build information. I will post more on this build later...

Ben

I am a Veteran; to all other Veterans thank you for your service. Retired now and living well

PROJECTS:

- 1/350 USS Alabama - Staged

- 90mm Greek Hoplite Resin Figure - Done

- 120mm SS Panzer Officer - Done

 

 

 

  • Member since
    October 2009
Posted by JacknewbIII on Monday, February 11, 2019 4:07 PM

That Kubelwagon with the figures looks really cool I can't wait to see the build.

 

I just noticed I am missing one of the prop covers for the P-38 and am not much of a scratch builder. I do have one other to use so I was thinking I could cast one somehow any thoughts?

So I went ahead and tried to preshade under the BM finish finishing with Alclad. These were taken after a few rounds of brushing futures as the finish was not as smooth as I would have liked it to be for decals. I didn't get nearly the BM finish I have seen people get with Alclad but I used flat primers and next time I will use satin or gloss as I believe that will get the results I want. I was going for a worn metal finish but this might be too much what do you think?

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Tuesday, February 12, 2019 9:08 AM

Ben:  I updated the front page with the Kubelwagen.  Looks like a good project!

Jack:  I haven't had much success with weathering techniques of any kind, so I don't usually do them; meaning, I also don't have much insight into the finish you're trying to achieve with the NMF on the P-38.  From what I have read on the subject, I think you probably identified an issue with the flat primer.  I believe most people who use Alclad put down a glossy base.

I haven't built a NMF project in a while, but conventional wisdom was to obtain a very smooth, shiny surface by polishing the plastic.  I've always used paint.  Floquil used to have some very nice silvery-metallic paints, and I stocked up on a few bottles before the line was discontinued.

From the photos, if you were going for a grimy, worn look, I think you achieved it!  

 

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 8:16 PM

Normally I prefer to study the instructions before beginning any assembly. During this time I also determine the extent of extra detailing (scratch or after-market) I want to accomplish. During each step of assembly I look at the color callouts and also make my decisions on if I will follow them or go another route. I got my various tools, paints, cements, etc., so lets begin....

The instruction book, as previously mentioned is 24 pages. After opening the book I notice that the cover and the next 4 pages are the routine vehicle history, color callouts, basic modeling instructions, tips, etc.

Steps 1 and 2 of the build are the initial engine assembly as seen below. The color callouts show the entire engine is either mat-aluminum or semi-gloss black. When looking at actual photos or any real engine, you can easily see that it is not just 1 or 2 colors. For example there are even different hues or variations of a color, such as flat black, semi-gloss black, gloss black, rubber, etc. For this build I have decided to show some variations of colors to hopefully come up with a more realistic results. The second image shows some of the colors I am deciding to add within the build.

When building sub-assemblies, I, like many of you, normally build the entire assembly (if it is going to be the same color) before painting it. You can see in the image below that I assembled the engine and transmission halves along with the engine belly pan before painting. 

Another thing I chose to add, because of the scale, was the plug wires and fuel lines. This meant I had to drill out the distributor, heat shields (top of the cylinder heads), the end of the fuel pump, the carburetor, etc.. The instructions also called out for the transmission and engine case to both be mat-aluminum. To make it a slightly different shade I chose to first paint the transmission case a very dark gray and the engine portion a light gray (both acrylics). Likewise the finned cylinder sleeves were painted (acrylic) flat black. After the base coats dried I began to add a dark enamel (rubber, black, and gray mix) wash to get into the nooks and crannies of the engine and transmission. While it was drying I used a flat light gray enamel to dry-brush over the flat black fins of the cylinder sleeves causing the raised portions of the fins to accept the color and appear more like a casting (which they were in real life), not the aluminum in the callout. The transmission was then dry brushed a lighter shade of gray and then a finished light dry brush of silver. The engine case was dry brushed with a stronger coat of mat aluminum. The rubber seals around the pushrod tubes were painted well.... rubber, and not black as the callout shows. When looking at the fuel pump and comparing it to real ones, I decided to make the lower half a casting type of gray color and the pressed in top portion silver. The starter was also multi-colored by making the portion attaching to the engine casting gray, the main starter case flat black, the end of the starter semi-gloss black, and the end of the solenoid a rust brown ceramic color. There is still much more engine to assemble.

Below is the finished results of steps 1 and 2.

See you at the next update, and as always; your comments are welcome...

v/r,

Ben

I am a Veteran; to all other Veterans thank you for your service. Retired now and living well

PROJECTS:

- 1/350 USS Alabama - Staged

- 90mm Greek Hoplite Resin Figure - Done

- 120mm SS Panzer Officer - Done

 

 

 

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 8:26 PM

My apologies everyone as I meant to post this first, before the first assembly of the 1/16 Kubelwagen. Here is the beginning..... Confused Hmm Whistling

OVERVIEW: (Copied in part from Wikipedia and other sources)

The Volkswagen Kübelwagen was a light military vehicle designed by Ferdinand Porsche and built by Volkswagen during World War II for use by the German military. Based heavily on the Volkswagen Beetle, it was prototyped as the Type 62, but eventually became known internally as the Type 82. This body style had first been developed by Karosseriefabrik Nikolaus Trutz in 1923. Mercedes, Opel and Tatra also built Kübelsitzwagen. With its rolling chassis and mechanics built at Stadt des KdF-Wagens (renamed Wolfsburg after 1945), and its body built by US-owned firm Ambi Budd Presswerke in Berlin, the Kübelwagen was for the Germans what the Jeep and GAZ-67 were for the Allies.

DEVELOPMENT: (Copied in part from Wikipedia and other sources)

Although Adolf Hitler discussed with Ferdinand Porsche the possibility of military application of the Volkswagen as early as April 1934, it was not until January 1938 that high-ranking Third Reich army officials formally approached Porsche about designing an inexpensive, light-weight military transport vehicle, that could be operated reliably both on- and off-road, in even the most extreme conditions. Porsche began work on the project immediately, having a prototype of the vehicle ready within the month. In order to guarantee adequate off-road performance of a two-wheel-drive vehicle with a 1,000 cc FMCV 1 engine, it would have to be lightweight. In fact, the army had stipulated a laden weight of 950 kg (2,090 lb), including four battle-dressed troops, which meant that the vehicle itself should not weigh more than 550 kg (1,210 lb).

Developmental testing by the military began after a presentation of the prototypes designated as Type 62 in November 1938. Despite lacking four wheel drive, a mainstay of the American military Jeeps, the vehicle proved very competent at maneuvering its way over rough terrain, even in a direct comparison with a contemporary standard German army 4×4, and the project was given the green light for further development. Further development of the Type 62 took place during 1939, including a more angular body design, and pre-production models were field-tested in the invasion of Poland. Despite their overall satisfaction with the vehicle's performance, military commanders demanded that a few important changes: the lowest speed had to be reduced from 8 km/h (5.0 mph) to 4 km/h (2.5 mph) as an adjustment to the pace of marching soldiers. Second, it needed some improvement of its off-road ability. Porsche responded to both requests by mounting new axles with gear-reduction hubs, providing the car with more torque and more ground-clearance all at once. Revised dampers, 41 cm (16 in) wheels, and a limited slip differential, as well as countless small modifications, completed the specification. In order to reflect the changes, the vehicle was renamed Type 82.

Full-scale production of the Type 82 Kübelwagen started in February 1940. No major changes took place before production ended in 1945, only small modifications were implemented. Prototype versions were assembled with four-wheel-drive (Type 86) and different engines, but none offered a significant increase in performance or capability over the existing Type 82. As of March 1943, the car received a revised dash and the bigger 1,131 cc engine, developed for the Schwimmwagen, that produced more torque and power than the original 985 cc unit. When production ceased at the end of the war, 50,435 Kübelwagen vehicles had been produced.

Long after the end of the war, VW resurrected the basic Kübelwagen design as the 1969 Type 181, developed for the German Federal Armed Forces and later also produced for the civilian market, known as "Thing" in the US, "Trekker" in the UK, and "Safari" in Mexico. Although similar in looks and design, almost no parts were interchangeable with the Type 82.

THE MODEL KIT: (Partially copied from the Scalemates and missing-lynx sites with my input and photos)

One word.. LARGE; when you open the box, it is full with no dead air space. The kit consists of 8 large sprues with extremely crisp molded parts, 2 sprues of clear parts, 5 hollow rubber tires, a decal sheet and nice 24 page instruction booklet. The parts layout is quite similar to the smaller 1/35 scale version Tamiya makes of this kit, except that there is a significant amount of added detail. Markings are included for 5 vehicles: sPzAbt 501 in Tunisia, a Luftwaffe AA unit in Tunisia, Ramke’s brigade in North Afrika, 999 Light Divison in Italy and a vehicle from an unknown unit.

A large number of parts on sprue “F” deal with a beautifully detailed engine. Molding quality is top notch as excepted from a recent Tamiya tool. The cooling fins on the cylinder heads, flexible hose heating ducts and transmission are beautifully rendered. Suspension detail is excellent and the front wheels can be displayed “turned”. 

Sprue “A” deals with the main body side panels. Mold ejection pin marks are kept to a minimum and usually located in areas which will never be seen once the model is assembled. This sprue really gives you and idea of how large this kit is. The finished model will be longer than a 1/35 Tiger I.

Sprue “B” deals with many of the interior parts. A nice touch is that the seatbacks are separate so that the knockout marks are hidden. The 1/16 Kubel seatbacks have nicely rendered springs. The texture on the seats themselves is restrained as they should be for the type of material used, the detail of the folded roof is excellent. 

Sprue “K” contains the hood (or bonnet), wheel rims and some accessories.

Sprue “E” contains the main chassis pan and doors. One of the best features of this kit is that the wood floorboard of the Kubel is molded separately making painting much easier. You can simply paint the model interior gray or tan and insert the wood coloured painted floorboards after. The doors themselves have separate handles, a nice touch.  

Sprues “J” and “Z” contain a very nicely done driver figure and the previously released figure of Rommel. Sprue “Y” contains personal equipment.

The windshield comes on a clear sprue, but also included is a clear taillight which allows you to mask off the clear areas before painting. Also included is a normal plastic tailight in case you don’t want to mask a clear part. The speedometer is supplied as both a standard plastic part you have to paint in or as a flat part in which a decal is applied and then sandwiched between a clear face.

Now if you read this prior to the previous message things will be OK.Bang Head

Until next time...

I am a Veteran; to all other Veterans thank you for your service. Retired now and living well

PROJECTS:

- 1/350 USS Alabama - Staged

- 90mm Greek Hoplite Resin Figure - Done

- 120mm SS Panzer Officer - Done

 

 

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, February 14, 2019 3:14 AM

Looking forward to seeing that Kubel. I have been thinking about getting some lkarger scale kits such as the old Esci ones, but had not seen this.

One question though, are you planning on doing this as an Africa Korps vehicle?

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Dragon 1/35th Tiger I/AMT STAP with Battle Droid

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, February 14, 2019 3:17 AM

Jack, the gloss base if only needed if useing the high sheen Alclads. For the aluminiums it should be a flat finish. I have only done an NMF on a couple of build and use the Alclad black primer. It does take several coats to build it up, though i have never tried much weathering on them.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Dragon 1/35th Tiger I/AMT STAP with Battle Droid

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Thursday, February 14, 2019 8:47 AM

Bish,

Yes as this kit only has the baloon tires. There is another version out with regular tires, different figures, and a change of decals for non-desert units.

By you asking this question, it made me think about the variant I am building. I believe the north Africe desert exchange occurred prior to 1944. I hope that does not exclude me in building this for our GB ?

Ben

I am a Veteran; to all other Veterans thank you for your service. Retired now and living well

PROJECTS:

- 1/350 USS Alabama - Staged

- 90mm Greek Hoplite Resin Figure - Done

- 120mm SS Panzer Officer - Done

 

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2006
  • From: ON, Canada
Posted by jgeratic on Thursday, February 14, 2019 10:16 AM

Yeah, I noticed the DAK Kubelwagen too, but was hesitant to say anything.  The war in Africa ended in the spring of 1943.  For 1944, Rommel would be in France preparing the defences of the beaches.  Below is an image of him in October just before his suicide:

 

You could get away with the figure by just painting the uniform fieldgrey instead of tan.  For the vehicle there are separate standard (European) style tires:

I've linked them to Squadron mail order, but you might find them cheaper elsewhere.

 

regards,

Jack

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Thursday, February 14, 2019 3:08 PM

DRUMS01

Bish,

Yes as this kit only has the baloon tires. There is another version out with regular tires, different figures, and a change of decals for non-desert units.

By you asking this question, it made me think about the variant I am building. I believe the north Africe desert exchange occurred prior to 1944. I hope that does not exclude me in building this for our GB ?

Ben

 
I'd think that there were Kubelwagen's abandoned and left in Afrika after the end of hostilities.  Yes

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Thursday, February 14, 2019 3:13 PM

I have been shopping for either Trakz or Warrior 1/16 Kubelwagen tires (or wheels and tires) with little success. Actually, the only place I found them available was at Squadron. 

I then had another idea of asking Tamiya USA if I could purchase sprue 9003559 and tire bag 9403090 (regular tires). I sent them an e-mail awaiting thier response. If not I will most likely go with Squadrons set (made by Trakz). Thanks for the information about Squadrons availability....

Till then I will continue with the build...

Ben

I am a Veteran; to all other Veterans thank you for your service. Retired now and living well

PROJECTS:

- 1/350 USS Alabama - Staged

- 90mm Greek Hoplite Resin Figure - Done

- 120mm SS Panzer Officer - Done

 

 

 

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Colorado Springs
Posted by mawright20 on Thursday, February 14, 2019 7:10 PM
I wouldn't call Rommel's death suicide. He was given the choice of swallowing cyanide or having his family abused by the Gestapo. After all he did for the German nation over two wars.
  • Member since
    February 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Thursday, February 14, 2019 10:11 PM

If you're curious on how a really good modeler experimented to get a "worn" look on natural metal, check Doog's Models on YouTube: "Bare Metal Variance - Part 1" and same title, Part 2. Doog changed my modeling with black basing - it's a place to look, especially as WWII NMF planes most certainly didn't look really bright and shinny.

Kubelwagen - that's a hoot. Those things were made by the zillions and used throughout the war. The Germans claimed they were as good as Jeeps, but, who won the war? Very high "funk" factor. I did a 1/35 from the company that later became TASCA and it was a gas. Don't think Rommel would have been in one after he was ordered out of Tunisia. Field Marshalls in Europe rode in Mercedes Staff Cars - a decision that put Rommel in the hospital when the July 20 plot came off. And with it, any real chance that the Paris HQ might have turned against Berlin. Probably wouldn't have anyway - but it was like fortune wanted Hitler to live and bring the war to its armageddon end.

Pretty well into the build of the Tamiya Panther D. This is the new tool model, and it's simply a delight. The build is extraordinary. It's so good that I fell asleep and made a major blunder that I think I was able to fix with no harm done. There's 300 parts and plenty of detail - Tamiya does no wrong.

Eric

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    April 2006
  • From: ON, Canada
Posted by jgeratic on Thursday, February 14, 2019 10:37 PM

I think Rommel and the Kubelwagen are still good combination, as both were around in 1944  - just can't be his personal vehicle.   Actually he was offered one after visiting the front in July, but turned it down.

  http://www.rcinet.ca/en/2016/07/15/history-july-17-1944-the-canadian-who-changed-the-course-of-wwii/

 

regards,

Jack

  • Member since
    February 2010
  • From: Berkeley CA/St. Paul MN
Posted by EBergerud on Friday, February 15, 2019 12:43 AM
Very spiffy factoid. Wonder what Rommel was doing on an open road in decent weather? Not that a jabo wouldn't have attacked anything that moved, but who knows maybe the KWagen came with a smarter driver. And three days before the bomb in Prussia. Eric

 

A model boat is much cheaper than a real one and won't sink with you in it.

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Friday, February 15, 2019 12:43 PM

jgeratic

I think Rommel and the Kubelwagen are still good combination, as both were around in 1944  - just can't be his personal vehicle.   Actually he was offered one after visiting the front in July, but turned it down.

  http://www.rcinet.ca/en/2016/07/15/history-july-17-1944-the-canadian-who-changed-the-course-of-wwii/

regards,

Jack

 
Might make for a good diorama--Rommel just saying no--or nein, as the case may be.

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Friday, February 15, 2019 7:34 PM

Here are steps 3, 4, and 5 of my Kubelwagen build. As you can see, they do not have a large parts count to the three steps, but when complete, it really starts looking like an engine. Basically, it is adding the air box, generator, intake, distributor, half shafts, generator belt and pullys, the lower engine mount, and part of the lower chassis. 

Image

I followed the paint callout for the alternator to make it mat aluminum but then added a dirty wash to bring out the fins by the pully. I changed the colors of the intake from semi-gloss black to gloss black. The distributor was drilled to accept black wire for the ignition lines. The colors of the distributor were also changed with the based colored in an antique/burnt gold and the distributor cap a brown to replicate a plastic look. Wires were added to the distributor then curved to go behind the generator bracket and behind the fuel pump. After that they were shaped to turn into the drilled holes on top of the cylinders. The pullys were painted gun metal then dry brushed to bring out the detail and appear slightly worn, the belt was painted rubber. Next, the engine mounting bracket was washed to bring out the details (nuts/bolts/fins, etc.). At this point I am choosing to leave the custom fuel line off of the fuel pump until the upper engine bay is further along.

Now I had to decide if the chassis was going to be gray or tan (dunkelgelb); I chose the tan. When looking at reference photos, I've seen many from Africa to France all shown in some form of tan. The difference is the additional rust and green camouflage patterns found in Europe that are sprayed over the tan where North Africa was normally only sand/tan. This will allow be to continue with the desert build, or possibly purchase some regular wheels and tires to bring it into a European paint scheme.

Based on that decision, I kept the half shafts tan but painted the rubber boots in rubber. The instructions indicated they should be semi-gloss black. In all my research I did not see any in semi-gloss black, but I did see them in tan and gray. A dirty wash then added to the fittings on the half shafts. Here is what it looks like all together:

Image

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Image

I plan on blending the wash better as the assemblies come together. As always, please let me know what you think and if I am still on target with the build. Till next time....

Hey Jack, hows the Lightning coming along?

And lets see something on the Tiger and Panther; I'm excited to see how your doing on them. 

v/r,

Ben

I am a Veteran; to all other Veterans thank you for your service. Retired now and living well

PROJECTS:

- 1/350 USS Alabama - Staged

- 90mm Greek Hoplite Resin Figure - Done

- 120mm SS Panzer Officer - Done

 

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Friday, February 15, 2019 10:38 PM

That is a beautifully done engine, Ben.  Congratulations on your work!

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    October 2009
Posted by JacknewbIII on Saturday, February 16, 2019 12:16 PM

Ben that engine looks great!

I just located the deep sky blue vallejo that I need to move forward yesterday. I also made a few prop covers out of playdough but they need to dry and not sure if they will work out. I am still looking for a solution there. Any tips appreciated!

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Monday, February 18, 2019 3:42 PM

I have only built one Fine Molds kit before and that was a TIE Interceptor from Star Wars. So i have really been loking forward to this.

The aircraft i am doing is a night bomber, which FM lists as a B-1. But from what i can find out, thats not correct, as simply adding exhausts shrouds and a black undercoat did not change the variant, the B-1 had a different gun arrangment. And KG.2, the unit the aircraft i'm doiung belong to, never operated the B from what i can find, only the A-1. But thats a technicality. The kit looks nicely detailed, there is no AM on the market for this, but i did add some PE belts from the spares box. I used the kit decals for the instruments and i didn't go to mad on detailing as the small pit will be hard to see.

After fitting it into the fuselage, i used some styrene rod for the frame that goes under the canopy and then fited the wings.

Fit has not been to bad so far. I have read one review which suggests the engine fit is not so good and i have done some dry fitting which seems to confirm this. So i am going to tackle those next.

 

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Dragon 1/35th Tiger I/AMT STAP with Battle Droid

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Monday, February 18, 2019 7:12 PM

Hi everyone... I got a little more done, moving forward.... 

This is the next steps in the instructions build process, specifically steps 6-8. It is basically the rear swing arms and the gear reduction hubs (part of the revisions to the kugel making it the model 82): 

Image

The instructions callout to paint the entire swing arm cylinder semi-gloss black. I chose to paint only the cylinder flat black, leaving the mounting bracket tan/dunkelgelb as seen on some reference photos. Then I lightly dry brushed gunship gray over the flat-black to enhance the details and make it look like a dark casting. The three part swing arm was assembled and added to the engine assembly. Next the finished suspension cylinders and action arms were added. The gear reduction parts were assembled and added to the end of the axles. The last step was a dirty wash and wipe down. I think I am also going to add the shift cable to the transmission and the wires to the starter before attaching the center spine to the main chassis. Until then, here is the results:

Image

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Step 8 introduces the main chassis. Before attaching anything I wanted to apply a basic weathering. After a quick look I noticed MANY ejection pin marks (28 of them) on the bottom of the chassis that needed to be cleaned-up before I could add any weathering. While the good thing is the top of is free of any mold marks, these took some time to remove. Here is what it looked like before clean-up:

Image

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After filing, a couple sanding sticks, foam sanding blocks, etc., here is the results (less a couple removed later).

Image

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And now the fun began with an enamel wash. The mix was flat brown and rubber. On the bottom I decided on a total coating of the wash while on the top I selectively added the wash:

Image

Image

After drying I used a combination of a thin cotton cloth, ear swabs, and a brush each with some enamel reducer to light remove the wash, leaving the recessed areas with the dirt as you see here:

Image

Image

So far I am satisfied with the color of weathering. As I move forward on the interior, I am anxious to see how the weathering looks through the wood slat floor. As the engine progresses I will add the fuel line and other details. I still plan on adding some mild chipping and pastels to the kugel as the build nears completion. I have not heard anything from Tamiya regarding the regular wheels and tires. I will give them this week and if there is no success I will look for other sources. 

I am really enjoying this build for its fit and details. I am happy that the molding lines are mostly non-existent. Other than the mold ejection pin marks on the bottom of the chassis, this kit has been spot free. Well, you know... leave a note and tell me what you think or if you have other suggestions. 

Bish: That cockpit looks great! That is a neat aircraft.

Everyone: Where is that 1/700 waterline kit and those tanks?

Jack: How did the P-38 prop caps turn out?

Till next time,

Ben

I am a Veteran; to all other Veterans thank you for your service. Retired now and living well

PROJECTS:

- 1/350 USS Alabama - Staged

- 90mm Greek Hoplite Resin Figure - Done

- 120mm SS Panzer Officer - Done

 

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Monday, February 18, 2019 8:45 PM

Nice work, Bish--and a particularly good looking cockpit!

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Monday, February 18, 2019 8:48 PM

Good work, Ben.  Along with plastic modeling, you can take up auto mechanics as a hobby!

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Monday, February 18, 2019 9:10 PM

Here's some progress on one of the 1/700 waterline ships--USS Iowa.

Here's the waterline bottom plate itself.  The cross pieces are meant to brace the sides of the hull.  The shiny silver things are weights to prevent the ship from toppling over.

And here's the hull sides.  The come in two pieces and have to be glued together fore and aft.  They are pretty floppy, so the cross pieces are probably going to be useful.

I forgot to take a photo of the hull and waterline plate assembled.  I have the deck attached, but no photo of that yet, either.

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

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