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1/35 M114A1 155mm Howitzer in Viet Nam, 9-29-13, Finished

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144 replies
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  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Monday, July 22, 2013 7:34 PM

Bill - You always have to rotate your stock and keep your lots straight!! thanks for stopping by the dump!

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Monday, July 22, 2013 7:29 PM

Nice to see the ammo dump is getting a resupply Mike, keep at it! Yes

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Sunday, July 21, 2013 8:17 PM

Well been busy working on casting. Once the rubber sets you cut the mold on either side to remove the master. The mold on the left has had the master removed. You can see the space on top for the pour block. The one on the right still needs the master removed.
I use a 5-gallon pail lid which fits inside the pressure pot. With handles on the lid, it allows me to fill all the molds and carry them to the pressure pot, seal and pressurize.
Well 10 parts of A, 9 parts of B, a bit of time in the pressure pot and…..
Clear molds, dust with a bit of baby powder and go again. Filling the ammunition bunker. Back soon.
As always if you have any comments, please feel free to drop in.
Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Thursday, July 11, 2013 7:38 PM

Subfixer - Not a problem..... vacuum will also work. The main thing you are trying to do is remove the air bubbles from the mix.

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    March 2004
  • From: Spartanburg, SC
Posted by subfixer on Thursday, July 11, 2013 11:41 AM

On the pressure pot thing; This method provides positive pressure to force bubbles out. Would negative pressure pull the bubbles out? I have a Food Saver vacuum system that I sometimes use for marinating meat. It pulls out the air, permeates the meat with liquid and greatly reduces the time required for marinating. I wonder if this might work for resin molding. Any ideas?

I hope this doesn't turn into a thread hijacking. If it will, I will place this question in the appropriate forum section. Thanks.

I'm from the government and I'm here to help.

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Thursday, July 11, 2013 5:53 AM

Dogfish - I like cake!!  Thanks

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    October 2010
  • From: Hoodsport, WA
Posted by Dogfish_7 on Thursday, July 11, 2013 3:49 AM

Icing on the cake!

Bruce

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Wednesday, July 10, 2013 6:37 PM

Karl - Coming from a fantastic figure painter in you, I am humbled by you comment. Thanks

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    January 2007
Posted by the doog on Wednesday, July 10, 2013 9:03 AM

Man, those helmets look great!

Cool stuff, Mike!

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Tuesday, July 9, 2013 5:55 AM

Gunner - If you are going to do resin there is an investment. It is a payback over time.

Gamera - Thanks for the peek. Glad to have given you a tip!!

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, July 8, 2013 9:57 PM

Yeap, I too love all those little details you're adding there!

And interesting, I'd never thought of putting the resin under pressure, good idea!

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: Ontario, Canada
Posted by gunner_chris on Monday, July 8, 2013 9:00 PM

redleg12

Pawel - Some of the different petroleum manufacturers marked their drums with company colors. As I remember Texaco would have a red stripe and logo. Also diesel would be marked with red at times. Could be either. Was just trying to get a little depth to the color!!

Gunner - The pressure pot is this pressure paint tank

www.harborfreight.com/2-1-2-half-gallon-pressure-paint-tank-66839.html  

By using the the pressure pot and putting 30 psi of pressure on the wet resin in the mold or the mold resin itself, it forces the bubbles out of the mix and forces the resin into the mold. The molded part then comes out with no bubbles or fisheyes.

Rounds Complete!!

That's not a cheap piece of kit unless you do a fair amount of resin, but if you're going to do it right you sure need the right tools.

Thanks

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Monday, July 8, 2013 6:41 PM

Pawel - Some of the different petroleum manufacturers marked their drums with company colors. As I remember Texaco would have a red stripe and logo. Also diesel would be marked with red at times. Could be either. Was just trying to get a little depth to the color!!

Gunner - The pressure pot is this pressure paint tank

www.harborfreight.com/2-1-2-half-gallon-pressure-paint-tank-66839.html  

By using the the pressure pot and putting 30 psi of pressure on the wet resin in the mold or the mold resin itself, it forces the bubbles out of the mix and forces the resin into the mold. The molded part then comes out with no bubbles or fisheyes.

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: Ontario, Canada
Posted by gunner_chris on Monday, July 8, 2013 1:36 PM

Your attention to detail is unreal.

And I love the use of something as simple as lego.  I've heard of it used to help square off building/structure making but not for this.

When you mention pressure pot, just as simple as a pressure cooking pot (great for rations if you don't have heater packs)?  Please elaborate if you don't mind?

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Monday, July 8, 2013 7:56 AM

Mike - nice work on the details! Do those red bands on the drums have a special meaning? Good luck with your project and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Monday, July 8, 2013 5:37 AM

Bill - There is always a use for everything even the old Legos!! Time for the arsenal to open. Thanks for stopping in and for the comments.

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Sunday, July 7, 2013 7:44 PM

Got to love the use of the Legos Mike! Nice to see the factory is getting ready to churn out the supplies you need to stock this one. Nice work as usual on all the little details. Wink

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Sunday, July 7, 2013 7:18 PM

This week is a little bit of everything. First working on the ammunition storage bunker, I created the back wall, which will not be visible except looking through the front. I used some stock ammunition crates for the base and a bunch of Tamiya drums. The drums are painted with Tamiya Flat Black and the center bands are Flat Red. The crates are painted with Tamiya Buff.

Next is the communication table. The TA-312 and AN/GRA-39B are from stock parts along with the hand set. The commo equipment are painted with Poly Scale US Dark Green and the handset with Vallejo black. The wire is coiled from 32 gauge stainless wire also painted black. The DA 4513 to record is a copy of the actual form filled out partially. A filled out form is folded and on the side of the GRA-39 and the pad for recording upcoming missions on the table.

I plan on having some helmets around the position. Using Bravo 6 Vietnam Helmets. The paint is Vallejo US Uniform Green (light green), US Dark Green, US OD for the band and 50/50 mix of Beige and Rust for the reddish beige color. The insides are painted Saddle Brown.  On two helmets the bug container is painted with Poly Scale Dark Green. The one helmet I used a decal of a pack of Marlboro and the Zippo painted with Tamiya Metallic Grey.

On the resin side, started with the kit ammunition and powder container glued to some scrap resin for a pour bar

Next, get out your Legos… and create mold boxes around the items to be molded.

Then mix up rubber mold compound, I use Smooth Cast Mold Max 30, pour the molding compound into the mold boxes. Then it is off to the pressure pot and let the molds cure overnight under 30 psi of pressure.

That’s it for now. I will start casting as soon as the molds clear curing. Also lots more details to create.

As always if you have any comments, please feel free to drop in.

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Sunday, July 7, 2013 8:05 AM

Capn Mac - Yep....BA-30....always in need!! Thanks for the comment on the barrel. It is a unique look.

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, July 7, 2013 1:58 AM

Now, Redleg, you know that's a sea-story; one has ever had a working GRA-39 AND 6 working BA30s . . .

(The logic that goes:  "Hey, the beachmasters already have a commo section; let's colocate the FAC with them" is a fascinating teaching tool.  I'm not sure that the lessons learned have that great a utility . . . .other than to be part of "Things I will not do as Ops Planner")

Oh, and I'm still jealous of how you got that greasy look just using smoke.

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Friday, July 5, 2013 5:45 AM

And remember none of this is high tech.... the TA-312 uses 2 BA-30 or D size batteries. The AN-GRA 39B uses 6 D size batteries. The alternate is to use the battery from a PRC-77. You remove the jack from the battery and connect the wires directly to the terminals. The speaker would eat up batteries.

Rounds Complete!!.

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Friday, July 5, 2013 1:58 AM

Hello! Now ain't that a signal talk Big Smile I like this subject, telecommunications is my business after all!

Thanks for the info, have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Thursday, July 4, 2013 8:16 PM

Pawel
I have to look that telephone type up!

It's the phone that followed the EE-1, significantly smaller & handier, too,  If still with the limitation of needing a pair of D-size batteries.  But, the connections were/are compatible with a whole range of r/t equipment--so you could install a headset rig and/or a speaker for the person installed at the switchboard. 

It only took a simple grain-of-wheat lamp wired  on top (multi-tool screwdriver-only modification) to show if a line was in use (or being tampered with).  It was "wire friendly" too.

The replacement TA-1/PT needs no batteries, but, it's much harder to to adapt to local needs--like adding a speaker for the mortar squad leader, or rigging a lamp instead of ringers for the OPs.  Ok, so the hard cases for the TA-1s are a bit more water-resistant than the carriers for the PA-312; but the TA-1 are a lot less water-friendly, which is a major issue when taking them across a littoral on a regular basis.

But, I may be biased in this.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Thursday, July 4, 2013 7:54 PM

redleg12
I have to find an air freshener for the studio with that odor!!

In my "grown up" life, I've had opportunity to be on a job site when the rental agency would deliver some piece of equipment that had been out in the sun a while, and the agency had lubed up just before delivery.  So, it would have that mix of hot metal, fresh lube, hint of burnt diesel from the delivery truck . . .

Then, the hard hat & workboots would combine to make a person keep being distracted by a lack of LBE.

Some of those days needed an extra beverage after work--such is life & memories.

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Wednesday, July 3, 2013 7:52 PM

Dogfish - Thanks for the comments, love my details

Karl - You know me...love the little things. as always thanks

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    January 2007
Posted by the doog on Wednesday, July 3, 2013 6:56 AM

All those little details are RIGHTEOUS, Mike!

The map decal is brilliant!!

  • Member since
    October 2010
  • From: Hoodsport, WA
Posted by Dogfish_7 on Wednesday, July 3, 2013 6:48 AM

Nice touch with the brake line details!

Bruce

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Wednesday, July 3, 2013 2:02 AM

Mike, thanks again - you did all the work for me! Big Smile

Have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Tuesday, July 2, 2013 8:59 PM

Pawel - Here is the TA 312..

www.bunkerofdoom.com/.../ta_312_2.jpg

Here is the remote speaker unit, A/N GRA 39B

farm3.static.flickr.com/.../4129451029_8d89f7a36f.jpg

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Tuesday, July 2, 2013 9:18 AM

Mike - thanks a lot for that info! I have to look that telephone type up! Good luck with your project and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

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