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Academy 1/35 scale USMC M50A1 ONTOS

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  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, March 18, 2020 10:49 AM

DRUMS01
I am not a long time ship modeler. My only other ship build was last year, the HMS Roberts

 

Very nice ship model there.

I'm smiling- a ship only a Red Leg could love. Shore bombardment for Operation Torch, D-Day at Sword Beach.

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, March 18, 2020 11:26 AM

No idea about the right colour for the casings but the interior looks great from here! 

 

Ben: Great job there on the monitor too!  

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Wednesday, March 18, 2020 2:50 PM

stikpusher

Sarge, the 106mm RR round casings are not made of brass, but are made of preforated steel, and instead have a lacquered or anodized coating. I only saw the 106 up close a couple of times in my career, and had no training on them whatsoever.

I almost think that the new color by Tamiya, “old bronze” might work as the casing.

this link has info on ammo

https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/ref/TM/pdfs/TM9-1300-204.pdf

 

Excellent find Carlos... I'll hold off painting the shells until I get that Tamiya old bronze paint. Thank you.

Harold

 

  

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Saturday, March 21, 2020 2:18 AM

I completed as much of the interior detail painting as I can until I receive the bronze paint for the shell casings.

The next step while I wait for the paint is to assemble the exterior photo etched parts on the front and rear upper hull.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Saturday, March 21, 2020 12:22 PM

That looks sharp Harold, darn near the spitting image of the interior shots of the real thing!

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, March 21, 2020 1:21 PM

Ditto

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Sunday, March 22, 2020 10:59 PM

Thank you Gamera and Carlos. I finished painting the fire control panel guard and it's a little rough up close, but at least it looks more like the the real thing now.

I finished the upper hull assembly too and ready to start steps 9, 10 and 11 which is the turret, recoilless rifles, spotting rifles and machine gun. Below is a rear-view illustration from the ONTOS manual and a photograph of the actual rear fenders. I think Academy made the rear fenders on their model to long.

The Tamiya bronze paint I ordered for the 106 mm casings should be delivered tomorrow and once they're painted, I can glue the upper and lower hulls together.

I have not glued the hatches down yet because I'm still thinking about how to display the ONTOS when it's finished. I like the idea GMorrison and Gamera suggested of adding a couple Marines and creating a wood base with a little ground cover.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Sunday, March 22, 2020 11:34 PM

HeavyArty

Actually, I believe that is the kit-supplied PE muffler guard.  Academy has been stepping up their recent kits to include PE.  This one was quite good.  You can see the three-part PE muffler guard in step 7 on the instructions below.

 

Gino, you were right about the Academy PE fret. In my opinion it's better engineered than some of the parts in the Voyager kit. I had the Voyager headlight guards glued on before I realized they looked terrible. So, I replaced them and the rear fender brackets with Academy PE parts. Who would have guessed?

Harold

  

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Monday, March 23, 2020 5:25 PM

Sergeant

 

Carlos, thank you for suggesting Tamiya Bronze. I could not find an 'old bronze' in Tamiya's acrylic paint line, but I did find Bronze X-33 which has metallic flakes in it, so I mixed it 3:1 with Tamiya Dark Copper XF-28. Please see the left spoon in the photograph below. I think the mix is near perfect match with the photograph of the shell casing above.

I also completed the turret assembly, so the next step is the assembly of 106 mm recoilless rifles and for that Voyager has supplied lightweight aluminum barrels to replace the plastic Academy barrels.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, March 23, 2020 8:37 PM

Sorry about the color misdirect Sarge. I kinda like the 1:1 mix better, but you’re the man on scene. 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Monday, March 23, 2020 10:30 PM

stikpusher

Sorry about the color misdirect Sarge. I kinda like the 1:1 mix better, but you’re the man on scene. 

 

You know, I think 1:1 is better too. I have learned so much more from veteran scale modelers like you Carlos in three years than I would have in nine or ten years on my own. In this regard I think FineScale Modeling has created a valuable tool in these Forums. The forum can allows its members to increase learning exponentially and it's fun.

I remember reading an article about the effects of light on surfaces. It suggested that model paint should be a touch lighter than the actual subject we are trying to represent with our model because the model surface is so much smaller. I know there are some very excellent modelers who disagree, but in this case we have a controlled experiment. I simply paint the shells 1:1 and when the paint is dry put the upper hull on and see if it looks right. If not, I add a second coat of 1:1, or change the mix to 2:1 or 3:1 what could be easier.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 10:06 AM

That looks really good! And I'd probably put a figure beside her to show how small the AFV is. 

The bronze mix looks good, pretty darn close to the real thing. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Far Northern CA
Posted by mrmike on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 1:31 PM

That is one fantastic interior - it's a shame to cover it over! Your post about how to display the finished model made me think about a photo of an APC I recently saw in a contest article. The upper hull appeared to be hinged on one side so the interior was totally visible. It's inspiring me to look into how to hinge one side of an Academy M113 Fitter, maybe a small wire and tube hinge like the car modellers use when they open doors and trunks.

Just a thought; your Ontos is a real work of art.

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 11:02 PM

Gamera

That looks really good! And I'd probably put a figure beside her to show how small the AFV is. 

The bronze mix looks good, pretty darn close to the real thing. 

 

Thank you Mrmike and Gamera; I like your suggestions. I started today thinking I would assemble the 106 mm recoilless rifles, but realized I needed the machine gun assembled first. Adding the Voyager PE parts to the machine gun was not as easy as I thought. I also gave the 106 mm casings a coat of 1:1 Tamiya mixed paint and they look right to me.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 11:03 AM

That MG looks really good! I've tried folding up those PE ammo boxes and not had much luck keeping them straight and square. And the teeny-tiny sights- WOW! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 11:46 AM

Gamera

That MG looks really good! I've tried folding up those PE ammo boxes and not had much luck keeping them straight and square. And the teeny-tiny sights- WOW! 

 

Gamera, there is an interesting back-story regarding the tiny little sight. It is about the size of the head of a straight pin. There were two in the kit and it takes about 30 seconds to form the sight an another 60 seconds to glue it on the gun. Most of that is just opening and closing the glue bottle. But it took me three hours to find them on my work space after I dropped them. I must have drop them 17 times and finely I decided they weren't worth the effort. Then while I was taking a break I saw one and lost it again, then I found the other one. In the end I only recovered one of the two, but I got it done.

Now the question; why in the world would someone design something for scale modelers you need X5 magnification to form? But more important why would any sane person bother to use it, myself included? Some times I think the people who design PE layout forget what happens when it's reduced to 1/35 scale. Example: if an actual gun sight is 1/2 inch high and you reduce it to 1/35 scale the sight become .0143 inches high, or <1/64".

Harold

  

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 1:42 PM

Sergeant

Now the question; why in the world would someone design something for scale modelers you need X5 magnification to form? But more important why would any sane person bother to use it, myself included? Some times I think the people who design PE layout forget what happens when it's reduced to 1/35 scale. Example: if an actual gun sight is 1/2 inch high and you reduce it to 1/35 scale the sight become .0143 inches high, or <1/64".

Harold

 

the simple answer is... because you’re a madman... 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 1:49 PM

stikpusher

 

 
Sergeant

Now the question; why in the world would someone design something for scale modelers you need X5 magnification to form? But more important why would any sane person bother to use it, myself included? Some times I think the people who design PE layout forget what happens when it's reduced to 1/35 scale. Example: if an actual gun sight is 1/2 inch high and you reduce it to 1/35 scale the sight become .0143 inches high, or <1/64".

Harold

 

 

 

the simple answer is... because you’re a madman... 

 

You're right!

  

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 6:35 PM

I served in South Vietnam from January 28 to March 5, 1966. I was a Navy hospital corpsman assigned to the Marine Corps' 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Division. I hadn't planned on such a short tour of duty — 37 days — but in Operation Utah, a sniper shattered my right femur, a wound which gave me a free ticket home and more than 10 months in the Navy's Balboa Hospital in San Diego.

A few days after our amphibious landing in South Vietnam, I encountered an Ontos, which I had never heard of at that time. Here's a photo, taken with my Nikonos I under water/all-weather camera, which I had bought specifically for Vietnam:

A U.S. Marine Corps Ontos in South Vietnam, January, 1966.

I talked briefly with one of the crew, probably the bare-headed guy. He told me that a day or so previously, they had fired all six of the 106mm recoilless rifles at the base of a pagoda, which promptly and not surprisingly collapsed. I guess we showed those Buddhists who was boss! 

Bob Ingraham

Vancouver

Almost finished: Airfix 1/72 HP.52 Hampden bomber & Minicraft 1/48 T-34 Mentor trainer. Starting to work on Italeri 1/72 UH-34 Seahorse helicopter & Academy 1/72 F-86F Sabre.

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 6:58 PM

Bobstamp

I served in South Vietnam from January 28 to March 5, 1966. I was a Navy hospital corpsman assigned to the Marine Corps' 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Division. I hadn't planned on such a short tour of duty — 37 days — but in Operation Utah, a sniper shattered my right femur, a wound which gave me a free ticket home and more than 10 months in the Navy's Balboa Hospital in San Diego.

A few days after our amphibious landing in South Vietnam, I encountered an Ontos, which I had never heard of at that time. Here's a photo, taken with my Nikonos I under water/all-weather camera, which I had bought specifically for Vietnam:

A U.S. Marine Corps Ontos in South Vietnam, January, 1966.

I talked briefly with one of the crew, probably the bare-headed guy. He told me that a day or so previously, they had fired all six of the 106mm recoilless rifles at the base of a pagoda, which promptly and not surprisingly collapsed. I guess we showed those Buddhists who was boss! 

Bob Ingraham

Vancouver

 

Bob, thank you for sharing your ONTOS picture and story.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    October 2015
  • From: Tacoma, WA.
Posted by M60_ tanker on Friday, March 27, 2020 5:45 PM

Found this on youtube. You might find it interesting.

https://youtu.be/T0t-0l0Zv0I

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Sunday, March 29, 2020 3:52 AM

M60_ tanker

Found this on youtube. You might find it interesting.

https://youtu.be/T0t-0l0Zv0I

 

Thank you M60_tanker. I completed the interior painting and main weapon assembly. I have a few exterior details to finish and then it's ready for primer.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, March 29, 2020 5:13 PM

Nice! Those recoiless rifles look awesome!!!

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, March 29, 2020 7:42 PM

Looks just about ready for primer and paint on the exterior. Are you going to weather and dirty up the interior?

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Monday, March 30, 2020 3:33 PM

stikpusher

Looks just about ready for primer and paint on the exterior. Are you going to weather and dirty up the interior?

 

Thank you Gamera and Carlos.

So the question is 'factory finish' or 'weathered, worn and rusted'. To make a scale model look realistic the current thinking amongst model builders is that it must have weathering. I agree with this trend and marvel at others skill in performing this process.

Personally, I like as little weathering as possible and still have the model look realistic; however, I understand the theme of a diorama or vignette may require more weathering, distress and even battle damage. I've ordered several Vallejo Wash colors to use on this model.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    October 2015
  • From: Tacoma, WA.
Posted by M60_ tanker on Monday, March 30, 2020 3:46 PM

I too, spent many years in the Army. Being anal retentive was part of the job. I try to keep weathering down to a mininum. Drives me crazy when I see a tank or other vehicle and it looks like it has just been drug out of a swap after 50 years. Especially M60 tanks. My bread and butter for 10 years of my life. Sorry for the rant.

Ray

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Monday, March 30, 2020 3:49 PM

M60_ tanker

I too, spent many years in the Army. Being anal retentive was part of the job. I try to keep weathering down to a mininum. Drives me crazy when I see a tank or other vehicle and it looks like it has just been drug out of a swap after 50 years. Especially M60 tanks. My bread and butter for 10 years of my life. Sorry for the rant.

Ray

 

Ray it's nice to know I'm not alone. Thanks

Harold

  

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Monday, March 30, 2020 5:05 PM

I doubled the size of my paint booth in preparation for the next project. The ONTOS looks mighty small in this 33" Wide x 15" Deep space.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Monday, April 6, 2020 4:33 PM

Sergeant

 

James (Snapdragonxxx) asked me to confirm with Captain Rae Seely, USMC that Vallejo color #71.013 (FS34052) is the correct shade of green for Vietnam era Marine Corp tactical vehicles. Captain Seely who served in an ONTOS unit in Hawaii and Vietnam confirmed #71.013 is the right color and mentioned once a vehicle was in combat it never looked the same.

One of the reasons is a 'Marine Corp wash' was done with diesel fuel not soap and water and the original factory color was made darker by the diesel fuel. Also the ONTOS had light armor and was often hidden in the jungle and used to ambush the North Viet Cong, so according to Captain Seely it received a lot of wear and tear on the exterior paint.

One other thing I noticed while showing Rae the photographs Carlos (Stikpusher) provided is the inside of the doors and hatches were painted the same as the exterior. As Rae indicated the ONTOS was often hidden in the foliage to ambush the North Viet Cong and a white hatch cover that was opened would stand out in the jungle.

I also received the Vallejo Model Wash colors I ordered: #76.518 Black, #76.514 Dark Brown, #76.523 European Dust, #76.521 Oiled Earth, #76.513 Marron Brown, #76.505 Light Rust and #76.522 Desert Dust. I picked these colors thinking they would give me a good range to start from in weathering the ONTOS. So the next step is to dirty up the interior a little then glue the upper and lower hulls together.

Harold

  

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