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Dragon 1/35 M46 WIP

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  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, May 24, 2020 11:44 AM

plasticjunkie

 

 
stikpusher

And supposedly the Chinese were superstitious about big cats, so there was a psychological warfare aspect as well. 

 

 

 



 

Very interesting facts. Smart idea to play with their heads.

 

 

Who knows if it worked or not.... in any case it looked great!

 

Well last night was another online Zoom AMPS meeting. During the course of the meeting I worked on this kit and finished up the build work.

 

Steps 15 thru 19, adding all the turret fittings...

 

 

And with the turret on, the basic construction is finished!

 

 

now comes the fun part... the Tiger paint scheme!!!!

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Saturday, May 23, 2020 2:43 PM

stikpusher

And supposedly the Chinese were superstitious about big cats, so there was a psychological warfare aspect as well. 

 



Very interesting facts. Smart idea to play with their heads.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, May 23, 2020 12:45 PM

Harold, Graysnake, Bruce, PJ, thanks guys! For an early DML/Dragon kit, it’s not bad at all. It certainly holds up well for its age...

 

plasticjunkie

Just thinking about this colorful front art which actually defeats the OD's camo ability. I'm surprised the Army allowed such bright art work making it a very visible target for anti tank guns and other armor.  

 

 
Well, this was the theater commanders doing, General Matthew Ridgeway. These tanks were being used offensively, to roll back the Chicom gains from their winter 1950/51 offensive. Chinese armor and AT guns were pretty much non existent. The cause of most losses were mines primarily, and artillery or mortar fire, secondary. And supposedly the Chinese were superstitious about big cats, so there was a psychological warfare aspect as well. The US Army tank markings of this period have to be the most flamboyant ever used in combat. The Marines & Brits stuck with their standard schemes.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Saturday, May 23, 2020 11:38 AM

It's looking very good stik and can't wait to see the colorful art work on this one.

Just thinking about this colorful front art which actually defeats the OD's camo ability. I'm surprised the Army allowed such bright art work making it a very visible target for anti tank guns and other armor.  

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Saturday, May 23, 2020 11:20 AM

Carlos,

Very nice progress! I'm looking forward to seeing some paint on this beast!

 Bruce

 

 On the bench:  1/48 Eduard MiG-21MF

                        1/35 Takom Merkava Mk.I

 

  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: AZ,USA
Posted by GreySnake on Saturday, May 23, 2020 11:09 AM

Looking good Stik! 

 
  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Saturday, May 23, 2020 2:56 AM

It's coming along nice Carlos.

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, May 22, 2020 11:47 PM

Today’s update:

 

Step 12, build the 90mm main gun tube

 

 

Step 13, build the mantlet 

 

 

Step 14, build the basic turret

 

 

I think in about 48 hours I should have the construction all done!

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Thursday, May 21, 2020 6:32 PM

M1GarandFan
has everybody been! I've had nothing from this forum for about 3 months, and today, about 20 posts show up. Any ideas on why?

I gave up on email notifications long ago--Kalmbach has got something messed up with their forum software.

Which is not helped by the amount of bandwidth used up by WFH.

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, May 20, 2020 4:48 PM

Today’s update:

Step 9, assemble the fender stowage boxes... easy enough, just add the grab rails and latch handles

 

 

Step 10, glue the stowage boxes in place, assemble and add the exhausts, and final front hull small bits

 

 

Step 11, add final bits to the rear hull

 

 

and the hull assembly is now complete! 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, May 20, 2020 12:38 PM

So yesterday’s progress. 

I had to clean up the bottom side of the fenders, as they had some serious ejector pin flaws sticking out about 6mm or so. At best there is perhaps 2mm clearance between the top of the tracks and the fenders.

 

 

Before clean up

 

 

After clean up

 

Then I airbrushed on a coat of Flat Black over the outer surfaces of the tracks and lower surfaces of the fenders

 

 

 

Then I completed Step 8, gluing on the fenders and the right side headlight details, plus a few other small details

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 7:00 PM

M1GarandFan

Sorry to interrupt this post, but where the h--l has everybody been! I've had nothing from this forum for about 3 months, and today, about 20 posts show up. Any ideas on why?

 

 I’ve seen a bunch of complaints on here about folks not getting notifications. Then within the last 24hrs saying that they’re working again. 

I just check in every day myself...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 5:33 PM

Sorry to interrupt this post, but where the h--l has everybody been! I've had nothing from this forum for about 3 months, and today, about 20 posts show up. Any ideas on why?

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 3:39 PM

It’s really easy to do.And you do it last after decals, washes, etc. A solid dark coat of an earth color over the running gear and areas likely to be covered in dirt/mud. Then a thinner lighter coat of dry earth tones to replicate the drying out and dusty areas. 

Practice on a paint mule and you’ll get the hang of it quick. You can also add pigments for a little texture of clinging mud. Another option is to leave just the dark color on for a fresh wet look. There is quite a bit that you can do with this technique.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 12:51 PM

stikpusher

Thanks Gamera. It is so good to be past that point.

Harold, I’ll show you my T26 Pershing here and the weathering look that I am shooting for. In this case I painted it normally first. But as you can see, those colors pretty much disappear under the weathering.  And you can see where shadow areas missed are illuminated by the flash in the rear 1/4 view. But basicly it’s dark  earth tone, in this case Raw Umber I think, on top of the base colors, then a light earth tone, usually raw sienna applied over the darker colors in a light misted look to give more depth and the look of more wet stuff underneath drying out. 

 

 

Wow, I really want to learn how to do weathering like this. It is so realistic and yes I see what you mean about the shadow coat. It adds depth to the assembly giving you the impression this is a real working vehicle.

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 11:59 AM

Thanks Gamera. It is so good to be past that point.

Harold, I’ll show you my T26 Pershing here and the weathering look that I am shooting for. In this case I painted it normally first. But as you can see, those colors pretty much disappear under the weathering.  And you can see where shadow areas missed are illuminated by the flash in the rear 1/4 view. But basicly it’s dark  earth tone, in this case Raw Umber I think, on top of the base colors, then a light earth tone, usually raw sienna applied over the darker colors in a light misted look to give more depth and the look of more wet stuff underneath drying out. 

 

 

 

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 11:25 AM

SP: Nice work there- good to see the threads all together!!! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 11:11 AM

stikpusher

In this case, if I were to prime the hull in gray, I would leave the black on the suspension and running gear areas for shadow effect. Probably on the hull bottom also. But the hull front and rear would be in gray along with all surfaces abover the fender topsides for a uniform base color. If I were to prime. Seeing as I usually work with enamels, with their excellent adhesion qualities, and I’m not using brass or PE on the exterior, there is no absolute requirement to prime in this case. As there would be if I used that AM here and was working with some acrylics for my topside.

 I could have also gone with a base color of Burnt Umber on the running gear instead of black. I really wish that Photobucket hadn’t pulled their extortion stunt, because I had some good photos of the process that I’m going to use here on older build threads.

 

I understand what you said about the difference between enamel and acrylic paint and that will be a consideration for my project because I'm planning to use Vallejo surface primer and acrylic paint. I also get your key point that I can leave the black primer around the wheels and running gear under the fenders and paint the front, rear and top of the hull with gray primer.

I don't think I would have considered that option of two colors of primer, but it makes perfect sense. The reason that I like to use grey primer is I know what to expect with #71.043 Olive Drab. And while I haven't had much opportunity to experiment I have read that primer color can change the top coat color shade. But under the fenders is not a problem.

On my current project I originally intended to paint both vehicles olive drab. However I realized that after the Vietnam War camouflage paint schemes were the norm for tactical vehicles.

I'm watching and learning by your example.

Harold

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 10:23 AM

In this case, if I were to prime the hull in gray, I would leave the black on the suspension and running gear areas for shadow effect. Probably on the hull bottom also. But the hull front and rear would be in gray along with all surfaces abover the fender topsides for a uniform base color. If I were to prime. Seeing as I usually work with enamels, with their excellent adhesion qualities, and I’m not using brass or PE on the exterior, there is no absolute requirement to prime in this case. As there would be if I used that AM here and was working with some acrylics for my topside.

 I could have also gone with a base color of Burnt Umber on the running gear instead of black. I really wish that Photobucket hadn’t pulled their extortion stunt, because I had some good photos of the process that I’m going to use here on older build threads.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 8:10 AM

Thank you Carlos, your explanation confirms it's important to keep the glue surface clear of paint and allow the cement to melt the plastic making a good strong Joint without paint contamination.

I want to use your technique and give the exterior lower hull a coat of black primer as a shadow coat. Then I will paint the interior, but I'm still a little confused about the exterior.

With a full interior I must do the following steps:

1. Clean all the parts with alcohol before they are glued in place to remove molding compound and surface residue.

2. Then paint the interior with grey or white surface primer for good adhesion to the styrene, resin, brass and aluminum parts.

3. When the primer has dried, paint the interior with semi-gloss or satin white paint as a base coat.

4. Then hand paint the interior details.

Once all of the above steps are completed I can glue the upper and lower hulls together. At this point the lower hull has black primer and the upper hull has no primer. Do you paint the complete exterior with black primer? What if I want to use grey primer on the exterior, do I paint over the black on the lower hull? This is where I'm a little confused.

Harold

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, May 18, 2020 10:07 PM

Sergeant
 

Carlos, when you painted the exterior of the lower hull with black primer were you able to keep paint off the surface where you glue the upper and lower hulls together? Do you think it matters? I've been under the impression that glue like Tamiya Extra Thin Cement can be contaminated if paint is present.

 

Harold

 

Harold I had no problem with the black paint on the contact surfaces. Most of it was clear due to my angle of airbrushing on the black. The areas that did have paint I hit for a few swipes with a fine grit sanding stick and cleaned up.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Monday, May 18, 2020 8:51 PM

stikpusher
Back on to building today!

Step 7 upper hull added to lower hull and more small details added on the glacis plate

 

I’m letting this dry overnight then on the next steps tomorrow...

 

 

 

Carlos, when you painted the exterior of the lower hull with black primer were you able to keep paint off the surface where you glue the upper and lower hulls together? Do you think it matters? I've been under the impression that glue like Tamiya Extra Thin Cement can be contaminated if paint is present.

Harold

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, May 18, 2020 5:55 PM

Back on to building today!

 

Step 6, small details added to upper hull

 

 

Step 7 upper hull added to lower hull and more small details added on the glacis plate

 

 

I’m letting this dry overnight then on the next steps tomorrow...

 

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, May 16, 2020 4:40 PM

CapnMac82

 

 
stikpusher

Step 3, adding the road wheel arms, shock absorbers, and the transmission housing to the hull... there was a LOT of mold line clean up on all those parts, then making sure that the alignment is good getting all of them level and straight... note to self for the next Patton build, do the corner arms, then work inwards...

 

 

 

 

So, I'm scrolling through to get down to the most recent comment, and this picture struck me.

All I could think about was the Shep Paine dio booklet in the Monogram kit and on how he went to some trouble to cut (one, I think) arm to show a road whee going over some bit of terrain on the dio.  (I also have this memory he used a carriage bolt to hold the kit to the dio, too.)

I needed that rememory.  Many thanks.

 

Oh he did a lot more than just one.... good memories indeed....

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, May 16, 2020 4:33 PM

Thanks guys... doing the math that was 174 links total and 174 center guide teeth... I save all the extra parts off a kit... ya never know when they’ll come in useful. I built the M26A1 when it was first released back in the mid 90s, so those links have been with me a LONG time...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, May 16, 2020 4:32 PM

stikpusher

Step 3, adding the road wheel arms, shock absorbers, and the transmission housing to the hull... there was a LOT of mold line clean up on all those parts, then making sure that the alignment is good getting all of them level and straight... note to self for the next Patton build, do the corner arms, then work inwards...

 

 

So, I'm scrolling through to get down to the most recent comment, and this picture struck me.

All I could think about was the Shep Paine dio booklet in the Monogram kit and on how he went to some trouble to cut (one, I think) arm to show a road whee going over some bit of terrain on the dio.  (I also have this memory he used a carriage bolt to hold the kit to the dio, too.)

I needed that rememory.  Many thanks.

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Saturday, May 16, 2020 3:23 PM

Yay Stik!  I absolutely HATE indy link tracks w/ end connectors and center guide teeth.  But nothing beats the look.  Well done man!

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Saturday, May 16, 2020 3:06 PM

stikpusher
 

Now the hardest part of this project is behind me...

 

Carlos, It turned out perfect, and who would have thought saving links from another kit would get the job done? It just go's to show keeping spare parts is a very good idea. 

Back when you gave me some sand shields for my M4A3 Sherman I remember thinking why did he have spare parts, now three years later I know the answer because I have a bunch of spare parts too.

Harold

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, May 16, 2020 2:30 PM

Success!!!

 

In my morning session yesterday, I was able to get the tracks on!

 

 

 

Now if you notice the three darker links on the upper run, there’s reason for that. After completing the one side, it looked to me that there would not be enough links for the opposite side, and the spare links to be stowed on the turret side. So I went into my spares bin, found the remaining links from my old M26A1 build, and added them to the second side. I was partially correct in that once it was all done, there only would have been two links left for the spares on the turret. But that is not something that you want to discover in the middle or end of adding the indy link tracks. 

 

 

Now the hardest part of this project is behind me...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, May 12, 2020 1:43 PM

Sarge, you can easily prime gray over the black for your top coat base. The main reason for this is to get all the shadow areas in black beforehand. Otherwise they tend to show up in the end.

Gamera, once I get these damned tracks on, the remaining assembly will go rapidly.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

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