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AFV Club 1/35 AEC Matador British Army Artillery Tractor

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  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Tuesday, December 15, 2020 3:52 PM

It has been a few weeks since I posted any progress on the Matador, but I have not given up, just fell back and regrouped.

In my last post I showed the results of using EasyOff oven cleaner to remove a messed up camouflage paint job. As you can see below the oven cleaner took all the paint off except the olive green primer. I left the canopy somewhat unmolested so I could compare the difference. Then I experimented to see what it would take to remove the primer and leaned the Vallejo acrylic surface primer is so strong it even defies an attack of heavy duty oven cleaner.

In the mean time I decided to purchase a second AFV Club Matador model to make the changes I wanted and could not with the first model without doing major damage. On the second Matador I adjusted the steering linkage so the front wheels are in a turning position. I also changed the canopy so the canvas sides and back are rolled up. The front of the cab is waiting on a product that will allow me to clean any glue off that I get on the clear plastic windows.

The first Matador model is waiting on a product that is specifically designed to remove acrylic paint which I will use on the canopy to compare it's effectiveness to oven cleaner. I don't recommend oven cleaner for removing acrylic paint after trying it, mainly because it can chemically etch the plastic and it is difficult to control.

When the second Matador is ready I will give both models a good primer coat and finish coat of S.C.C. 15 British green Tamiya paint. Then I have Ammo and AK Interactive camouflage putty that I will use to create the camo pattern on both models. In making mistakes I have learned a lot of important new techniques and developed a greater understanding of camouflaged painting.

Harold

  

  

  • Member since
    November 2020
Posted by Also known as Rob on Wednesday, December 16, 2020 4:59 AM

Really interesting thread. Don't we always learn more from our mistakes than our successes Smile

  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: AZ,USA
Posted by GreySnake on Wednesday, December 16, 2020 7:06 AM
I admire your determination Harold.  For removing paint and primer I’ve had luck using Simple Green. I’ve soaked a couple models in it that I’ve wanted to restore and it stripped all of the paint off including the lacquer primer after submerging the model in it for twenty four hours. Can’t say if it will take the Vallejo off just thought I’d let you know.

 
  • Member since
    December 2005
  • From: Goteborg / Sverige
Posted by Svenne Duva on Wednesday, December 16, 2020 9:44 AM

So glad to see you posting again Harold.
Was getting really worried here.

Good news on the two Matadors (don't enver the bull) and those tilted wheels look good.
Always lends a bit of dynamic to the build.

Lots of surgery involved?
Mayor one on the Ford Gun Tractor!

Very Best Regards & Stay safe
Svenne


sic transit gloria mundi

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Wednesday, December 16, 2020 12:13 PM

Also known as Rob

Really interesting thread. Don't we always learn more from our mistakes than our successes Smile

 

Thank you Mike, TigerII, Dodgy, Rob, G.S. and Svenne. I completely agree Rob the best learned lessons are from the mistakes we make. I am not even upset about the way my first attempt at camouflage turned out. In the last four years of modeling I have had many failures while developing new skills, but that only served to make me more determined. I am usually not one to join Forums like this, but it has been a very good experience for me. I have learned so much more reading about other modelers ideas and sharing my own work, it is something I really enjoy doing every day.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Sunday, January 3, 2021 9:46 PM

It has been a few weeks since I posted my progress with the Matador. I am waiting on a product from VMS in Poland for clear plastic windows. It will allow me to remove any glue around the windows without damaging the clear plastic. This is important because the Matador has tilt out front ventilation windows with delicate photo-etched hardware.

While I've been waiting, I started an AFV Club late-production British 40mm Quick-Fire Bofors Anti-Aircraft gun the Matador will tow. What you see in the photographs below is the carriage of the gun. By the time the gun is completely assembled it will be almost as high as the top of the Matador.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: AZ,USA
Posted by GreySnake on Wednesday, January 6, 2021 7:40 PM

The carriage is looking very nice Harold. 

 
  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Thursday, January 21, 2021 1:20 PM

GreySnake

The carriage is looking very nice Harold. 

 

Thank you G.S. The 40mm Bofors Anti-Aircraft gun is finished and I'm back to work on the Matador. I assembled hardware for the tilt-out windows and finished hand painting selected items in the cab interior. I have a little more hand painting to do around the windows, but the cab is almost ready to glue together and add the roof. Then I will be ready to give the exterior a finish coat of S.C.C. 15 dark British green.

My dark British green is actually called olive drab, but it is not the same color as U.S. Army olive drab, so I call it dark British green or British O.D. This S.C.C. 15 color is a Mike Starmer Tamiya mix of 5 parts FX-61 Dark Green, 2 parts FX-62 Olive Drab, 2 parts FX-3 Flat Yellow and 1 part FX-53 Neutral Grey to lighten the mix just a touch. I used Mike Starmer's color chip in his British Army Colours & Disruptive Camouflage book.

Harold

 

  

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, January 21, 2021 7:38 PM

Looks pretty darn good to me Harold. How much more do you have left to go?

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Saturday, January 23, 2021 10:40 PM

Gamera

Looks pretty darn good to me Harold. How much more do you have left to go?

 

Thank you, Cliff. I finished the cab assembly and primer coat today. Tomorrow I should be ready for an exterior coat of S.C.C. 15 British O.D. I will probably only need two light coats since the top and lower part of the vehicle will be S.C.C. 14. For S.C.C. 14 Blue Black I will use Tamiya XF-69 Nato Black. The disruptive camouflage pattern and decals will be like the picture below of 'The Old Lady'.

Originally, I did not plan to use the 'Mickey Mouse' pattern, but Mike Starmer gave me information about the pattern that changed my mind. The War Office of the British government in World War 2 issued a directive to paint vehicles like the Matador with a foliage pattern; however, AEC and other manufactures could not mass produce a foliage pattern so the paint crews, which were mostly women came up with and alternative that was applied in the factory with circle templates. Thousands of British military vehicles had this pattern in one form or another during the early years of the war.

 

  

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Tuesday, January 26, 2021 3:43 AM

I haven't been on the site for some time Harold, so I'm doing some catch up. (Haven't been doing much at the bench either for that matter). Your matador is looking fantastic. Now I'll have a look at your Bofors build. Great work old mate.

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Tuesday, January 26, 2021 3:26 PM

Dodgy

I haven't been on the site for some time Harold, so I'm doing some catch up. (Haven't been doing much at the bench either for that matter). Your matador is looking fantastic. Now I'll have a look at your Bofors build. Great work old mate.

 

Great to hear from you Dodgy. It has been so long I thought you went 'walk about' and a big croc eat you.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Tuesday, January 26, 2021 9:13 PM

Very funny mate. I could tell you some stories about crocs. Some of them might even be true!

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Wednesday, January 27, 2021 9:43 AM

Dodgy

Very funny mate. I could tell you some stories about crocs. Some of them might even be true!

 

I am glad you are back, I missed your down under style of humor Mate.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Wednesday, January 27, 2021 4:49 PM

Actually,  I think we all missed that humor. I hang on all of your words. Keep up the conversation!

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Thursday, January 28, 2021 12:25 AM

M1GarandFan

Actually,  I think we all missed that humor. I hang on all of your words. Keep up the conversation!

 

Hello John, how are you doing my friend?

I finished the S.C.C. 15 British Olive Drab painting, so tomorrow is the real test for me. I have practiced flattening MIG Masking Putty with my wife's rolling pin, then cutting scallops with a hobby knife to create the 'Mickey Mouse' style of camouflage pattern that I am attempting to reproduce from the picture of 'The Old Lady' shown below.

The masking putty will be applied in sections over the British Olive Drab paint along the sides, front and back of the tractor body. Then all of the exposed surface, top and bottom will receive one or two light coats of Tamiya Nato Black to represent the S.C.C. 14 Blue Black color used for camouflage in 1944 Northern Europe.

Harold

 

 

 

  

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Thursday, January 28, 2021 2:35 PM

I'm doing well, Harold. Hope you are too.

Boy, the lorry and the 40mm bofors look really great! I finished up Takom's jeep and trailer last year and then, inspired by your 3 inch AT gun and the 40mm, I got and am working on AFV Club's 105mm M2A1 howitzer. Since it's still not painting season here, I also got Tamiya's M8 Greyhound to work on. I'll have plenty to paint when I finally get to it. 

Still watching your project and anticipating a wonderful finish.

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Sunday, January 31, 2021 7:48 PM

Looking great Harold. Even if the painting doesn't necessarily work out 100%, the washes and weathering will bring it all together. I reckon she'l come out a right beaut cobber!

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Monday, February 1, 2021 1:11 PM

M1GarandFan

I'm doing well, Harold. Hope you are too.

Boy, the lorry and the 40mm bofors look really great! I finished up Takom's jeep and trailer last year and then, inspired by your 3 inch AT gun and the 40mm, I got and am working on AFV Club's 105mm M2A1 howitzer. Since it's still not painting season here, I also got Tamiya's M8 Greyhound to work on. I'll have plenty to paint when I finally get to it. 

Still watching your project and anticipating a wonderful finish.

 

Thank you, John and Rob. John I would like to build the AFV Club M2A1, 105mm too. I want to join it with a 'Deuce and a half' as they were called during Vietnam. AFV Club recently came out with an M35A2, 2 1/2 Ton Cargo Truck #AF35004 that was often used to tow the M2A1 Howitzer.

I made some progress with the Matador camouflage painting. I finished the S.C.C. 14 British blue-black (Tamiya Nato Black) paint on the undercarriage and top of the tractor, so I am ready to do the sides, front and back.

I practiced making circles with stencils, masking tape, masking putty, stipple form brushes and paint brushes to create the 'Mickey Mouse' style scallops that will look like 'The Old Lady' camouflage pictured below. Every method I tried has issues, but I think the best method will be hand painting. It is the most challenging for me because I am not a good free-hand painter, but it will look more realistic than the other methods I have tried.

Rob, I don't know if the matador is a 'cobber', but I certainly feel like one some days. I will be 75 soon and I am not ready to be an old cobber yet.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Monday, February 1, 2021 4:21 PM

Sorry mate. I was being a bit of a smartaleck and put in a bit of Aussie bull. A 'cobber' is a mate, a good friend in our slang. We also like to whack an 'o' on the end of everything, so over here Harold becomes 'Harro'. 'Old' is often attached to things with no intended reference to the person's age, more to do with how long they've been friends, or as a term of endearment. i.e. G'day old mate. Sorry if I caused any confusion. It was the comment from your mate John about missing the humour, so I thought I'd chuck in something Paul Hogan like.

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Monday, February 1, 2021 4:42 PM

Dodgy

Sorry mate. I was being a bit of a smartaleck and put in a bit of Aussie bull. A 'cobber' is a mate, a good friend in our slang. We also like to whack an 'o' on the end of everything, so over here Harold becomes 'Harro'. 'Old' is often attached to things with no intended reference to the person's age, more to do with how long they've been friends, or as a term of endearment. i.e. G'day old mate. Sorry if I caused any confusion. It was the comment from your mate John about missing the humour, so I thought I'd chuck in something Paul Hogan like.

 

Rob I knew it was Aussie humor. I just didn't know what it meant. So I looked it up... I need a better Aussie dictionary don't I Mate.

Harold

  

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Monday, February 1, 2021 5:54 PM

Dodgy, don't worry. I love the interchange between you and Harold. Never been down under, but know a little Aussie slang. You keep being you! 

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Monday, February 1, 2021 6:24 PM

Ok Harro, I'll give you and Johno a bit of a rundown on some Aussie slang, but fist of all I've got to let my chooks out, so stay tuned. Oh, 'chooks', means chickens/hens.

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Monday, February 1, 2021 6:27 PM

Thanks mate. I like to be positive and have a bit of fun. I also love our slang, but a lot of it is falling into disuse as we become more 'sophisticated', so I make an effort to use the old sayings when I can.

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Monday, February 1, 2021 7:01 PM

Sophistication is overrated. Keep doing what you're doing. We love it.

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Monday, February 1, 2021 7:23 PM

g'day Harro and Johno. So here's a few Aussie terms.

Blowfly - dunny budgie

dunny - toilet

budgie - a small native bird that has proved to be very popular and is often bred in captivity.

stoush - a fight

blue or rangar - a redhead. a blue is also a fight.

strewth - an exclamation of suprise

dingo - a native wild dog, yellow in colour. - a coward or a backstabber

the Never Never - the outback. A reference to the magic and mystery of Aboriginal beliefs.

The Dreamtime - Aboriginal view of their history and beliefs.

Beyond the black stump - the middle of nowhere

She'll be right mate - it'll all be ok

Sheila - a female

Drongo - an idiot, also a whacker

Wanker - a person who thinks they know everything

Pub - the most wonderful place on God's earth. Where a bloke can get a beer.

Bloody and bugger - two of the most useful words in the English language. i.e. The blooder bugger ran of with me sheep, or, bloody hell, I'll kill that bugger on day, or bugger me! The last is a statement of amazement.

Digger - an Aussie soldier, also shortened to 'Dig'.

Ginger beer - *** or engineer

Turret Head - tankie

Blue Orchid, or Zoomie - airforce

Pongo - soldier Where the army goes, the pong goes.........

Pusser - sailor. No, it's not what you think. Its' the family name of a prominent ship's chandlers from Lord Nelson's days. i.e. pusser's issue.

dead horse - tomatoe sauce

Walkabout - to take off with no particular destination in mind

Fair Dinkum, or just Dinkum - the honest truth

The good oil, as above.

Furphy - a rumour. Named after the manufacturer of a water cart that was used on Gallipoli. As the cart went from point to point where soldiers gathered to have their canteens filled, the rumours went with the cart. What you blokes would call scuttlebut.

Pom - a person from Britain

Septic Tank - Yank. Sorry bout that, but.... This is an educational program.

Walloper - a copper/policeman. Also known as a 'jack'

Well boys, theres a few things for you to ponder from the land down under. I hope you get a good laugh!

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Monday, February 1, 2021 10:25 PM

Thank you, Rob for an introduction to real Aussie lingo.

On a more serious side, military history is one of my interests. Below is a picture I recently found of my Uncle Harold who I was named after. Like John he was in the Air Force, the Royal Canadian Air Force. Many American, Australian and Canadian airmen were trained in Canada by the RCAF to fill ranks in the Royal Air Force during the early years of World War 2. Uncle Harold was one of them.

He was born in 1918 on a large dairy farm (2,000 acers) in central Missouri. He wanted to be a pilot more than anything, but at the start of World War 2 the United States did not enter the war, so Uncle Harold went to stay with relatives in Nova Scotia, Canada and he joined the RCAF. There is no information about his training or even when he left Canada, but history books indicate the RCAF training lasted about two years. Working backwards from what we do know he would be about 22 years old when he received his wings.

We believe that he arrived in England in late 1940, or early 1941 as a Flight Sergeant Pilot, just in time for the North Africa Campaign I imagine. Uncle Harold wrote his family that he was a fighter pilot. Around 1944 we found records that show he had been transferred to 153 Squadron of Bomber Command (volunteer night bombers) and was now a Flying Officer Lieutenant and Pilot of Lancaster Bombers. Uncle Harold and three of his crew died in Laon, France 17 December 1944 on return from a mission over Ulm, Germany, he was 26 years old.

I never met my Uncle, but I lived in his house and heard my Mother and Grandmother talk about him often. Uncle Harold's generation have all passed away now, but I plan to write to the Air Ministry of the RAF and request as much information about him as they will provide. I have seen his grave at the Canadian War Cemetery in Dieppe, France. I also joined a group in Britain a few years ago call 153 Squadron Association in the hope I would meet someone who had a picture of my Uncle. A few days ago his picture mysteriously showed up on the Internet with supporting documents. I have no idea how or why it suddenly appeared.

Harold

 

  

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Monday, February 1, 2021 10:39 PM

Sad to have lost folks, but great to have historical pieces like that.  I have some things from my English Great Grandfather who died at the 3rd battle of Ypres in WWI and my Grandfather who was English coastal artillery(gunnery?) in WWII. 

I really like this project - from the vehichle to the paint scheme.  I've had the Tamiya quad gun tractor and  25 pounder in the stash for years wanting to do this camo so please, lots of pics on the technique!

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Monday, February 1, 2021 11:29 PM

Yes. Thanks Rob. That was a fun, informative lesson in Aussie lingo.

I felt privileged to be able to visit the Bomber Command memorial in London in March 2019. It's important to remember the losses that RAF Bomber Command suffered along with those of the U.S. 8th Air Force during the campaign over Europe in WW2. I'll always try to think of their sacrifice for we who came after.

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Tuesday, February 2, 2021 6:25 PM

Awsome info mate. Have the RCAF any records?

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

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