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Lola T-70 MkIII

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  • Member since
    October 2020
Lola T-70 MkIII
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 9, 2020 7:30 PM
I started this model about 16 months ago using the 1/12th Tamiya kit as a starting point.
The body has been heavily reworked and kit engine was discarded.
This shows some of the additional shimming, filling, fitting and reshaping.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Friday, October 9, 2020 8:11 PM

YES!!! I love 1/12 scale kits. Why did you discard the kit's engine? 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, October 9, 2020 8:27 PM

That was always one of my favorite racing body styles of all time. It will be fun to see what you do with it.

Thanks for the memories, I'd all but forgotten about Lola.

-Greg

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 9, 2020 8:32 PM

JohnnyK

YES!!! I love 1/12 scale kits. Why did you discard the kit's engine? 

 

 

I'm making a better one.  

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 9, 2020 8:33 PM
Proper double hung hinges for the also reworked engine cover were fabricated from brass, stainless steel and styrene.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March 2017
  • From: Oregon: Beautiful tree country.
Posted by treehuggerdave on Friday, October 9, 2020 8:59 PM

Beautiful work on this.

Back in the mid 60's I got to ride in one of these.

A red one with a Chevy engine.

Colin Chapman sent it to the U.S., and a friend of John Brunson the owner of Lancer Compnay, a slot car manufacturer, had a connection, and an Italian sportscar driver drove  it out on the freeway to Lancer company in  San Bernardino, and gave several of us a CRAZY RIDE in it.

 

He was actually roadblocked on the way out by police and a helicopter, but talked his way out of a ticket or jail time by giving everyone a ride - TRUE STORY

Man could that car handle and corner - SCARY.

We pulled next to a 1956 Ford while in town, and I was looking at the center of the door. They are LOW.

 

Beautiful work.

I'll continue following along.

Phil. 4:6-7   Jer. 29:11-14  John 3:13

On the bench - Hand made '50 Lincoln "Tail dragger"  1956 DeSoto 'vert., Resin '60 Chrysler 300 , Modelhaus resin '58 Pontiac hardtop kit.

Been a "Plastholic" all my life. Love this stuff.

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by Surface_Line on Saturday, October 10, 2020 12:48 AM

I don't want to hijack your thread, and to switch from your coupe to the spyder, but can one of you help me with any recognition factors between the T-70 Spider Mk I and Mk II and Mk III?

Thanks,
Rick

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 10, 2020 11:48 AM

Surface_Line

I don't want to hijack your thread, and to switch from your coupe to the spyder, but can one of you help me with any recognition factors between the T-70 Spider Mk I and Mk II and Mk III?

Thanks,
Rick

 

 

No worries Rick.  I'm really more familiar with the coupes than the spyders.  But an easy tell between a MkIII and MkIIIB is the larger headlights on the latter if that helps.  And there have been a lot of modifications on many of them later in life so it can get blurry.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 10, 2020 11:52 AM
These are the gas struts for the doors.
Upper hinges, acid cut brass.
The strut bodies are brass, the shafts are stainless steel.
The lower hinges are machined aluminum.
Closed.  They compress well.
Open.  They slide smoothly and provide just enough friction to keep the door open.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, October 10, 2020 12:38 PM

Following this build!  Nice work so far  

Thanks,

John

Ain't no reason to hang my head, I could wake up in the mornin' dead 

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 10, 2020 7:13 PM
After doing the more shimming, shaping and fitting work to the now hinged engine cover, I reworked the rear spoiler(s).

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Sunday, October 11, 2020 11:36 AM

You are definately bringing some mad skills to the table on this forum. This is one of the prettiest shapes ever done for racing. I am watching with great interest.

BK

On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 12, 2020 11:45 AM
The kit engine is a Small Block Chevy, but it doesn't quite look right on its own and it builds up differently than a "normal" American kit.   (Both issues probably due to it being designed to house an electric motor.)  Plus the heads were molded to the block halves and the rear of the block is a separate piece creating interesting seams.
I borrowed the 302 engine parts from a Monogram '69 Z/28 Camaro kit and made molds then cast resin copies.  When it's done it will be a stroked and bored and somewhat updated 385 c.i. (like in one of my real cars).
I cut off the oil filter, bellhousing & engine mounts from the oil pan, and the transmission & bellhousing from the block halves as well as the fuel pump from the front of the block.  The timing tab was also removed from the timing cover and the bolts (round bumps) were cut off and holes drilled in their place.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 12, 2020 11:47 AM
The rear of the block didn't look bad when it had a bellhousing molded to it, (and was going to be hidden by a firewall), but it turns out it is not at all symmetrical.  Since the rear of this engine will be very exposed when in the car I had to address it.  I added 0.020 sheet styrene and reworked it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 12, 2020 2:05 PM
The resin heads I cast have been reworked by removing all the molded on "bolts" (more round bumps) and drilling out for the aluminum replacements I'll machine.  The spark plug holes have been relocated to their proper locations too.  The exhaust ports have been hogged out and the holes for the accessory mounting brackets added.
(The white head is the stock Camaro one.)

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 12, 2020 2:05 PM
I started working over the Z/28 water pump I copied in resin, but I realized it wasn't the best choice for this application let alone an accurate piece even for what it is supposed to represent.  The shorter Corvette pump with the oversized bearing was more appropriate even though in the end it will hardly be visible, and it will buy me more space since the engine I'm using is longer than the kit provided one.
The Tamiya water pump actually was closer looking to the short style even though it didn't measure out or and has some "interesting" details.
Here's the Lola kit part.
Having a real pump at my feet made it a lot easier to modify the part into a more accurate rendition.  It still needs the mounting hardware and heater hose fitting to be machined and the sand cast texture to be added.
I also started reworking the harmonic balancer.  I shaved it down to a proper 8" diameter and installed a brass sleeve.  I also cut the timing mark into it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 12:50 PM
I machined a billet aluminum water pump pulley and matching crank pulley.
Both loosely sitting on the engine.

And at the other end of the engine...

I designed a correct Lola bellhousing in SolidWorks and had Fraxional 3D print it. 
It aligns to the block with two dowel pins like the real ones.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, October 14, 2020 12:23 PM
Since the exhaust port spacing on my heads is different on than the Tamiya parts I had to modify the rear of the inboard tubes to meet the collectors.
I used the header flanges I designed in SolidWorks and were printed by Fraxional and fitted the tubes to them and the heads.
 
Removable front engine cover for the interior. 
Since the engine I'm building is larger than the kit provided item, and I'm using a dual belt pulley set-up, I had to make room for the water pump pulley.
Before:
After:
 
I had Fraxional grow me a second bellhousing after I reengineered the center section where the transmission mounts to it.  (Very easy to deal with this 3D printing service.)
Like elsewhere throughout this project, magnets are used to hold these sub-assemblies together.
 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, October 15, 2020 10:25 AM
Rear hub carriers.  Step one, remove the brake calipers.
 
Reworked and assembled rear hub carriers.  Brass tubing was added for the hinge points and open holes.
 
 
Front spindles.  Step one, remove the brake calipers.
 
Front upper control arms as they come in the kit.
 
New fittings and bushings for the front pivot points.  Machined aluminum & brass with steel reinforcements.
Both arms with upgraded front bushings and adjusters.
And new fittings for the rear pivot points, same construction as the front ones.
Upper control arms dry fitted.
 
 
These are the tie-rod ends with adjusters for toe.  Brass and aluminum loosely assembled.
I acid treated them instead of using paint.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Thursday, October 15, 2020 10:58 PM

The work you are doing here is mind blowing. I'd love to see how you machine those aluminum parts.

BK

On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 16, 2020 10:49 AM

Thanks Brandon!  I use a Sherline Lathe and Mill, (non-CNC).

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 17, 2020 3:23 PM
A few more 3D parts I designed and had printed by Fraxional.
Flywheel with pressure plate & clutch (with the correct small 153 tooth flywheel).
Front side installed in bellhousing.
New corrected Hewland rear transaxle cover.  (The one in the kit said Hewlang.)
It's engineered to mount with magnets.  (I had the bosses for the magnets grown into the part.)
Full engine & transaxle dry fitted together.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Saturday, October 17, 2020 3:30 PM

Bow Down Bow DownStar

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 19, 2020 11:42 AM
Half shaft yokes I designed and were 3D printed by Fraxional.  The shafts are brass; the larger one has already been treated with acid for the color.  Just dry fitted together.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Lil Rebel on Monday, October 19, 2020 3:35 PM

I'm glad to see you over here. I've followed this build since you started, and was affraid I'd never see it finished. One of my favorite cars of the 60's, and you are doing an amazing labor of love to this not so accurate kit. I will be watching as you progress. Thanks for not just sharing your build but for chosing the Lola to show case your abilities.

                                                                                       Mike

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 19, 2020 4:45 PM
Here's the valve cover I designed and printed using the ones on my real car for reference.  It's hard to capture the details in the clear resin in photos.  The model will end up with cast copies in opaque urethane resin.
This is the inside of the valve cover master.  While I designed it with mounting features they filled in when the part was grown.  So I milled those features in by hand.
These are the resin versions of the valve covers.
The magnets are installed in one of them and mate to the ones in the heads.
 
These are the alternator parts I designed and had grown by Fraxional, but I neglected to send one of the part files so the clear piece is the inner/center section that I grew rather than wait for them to make it.  (Fraxional does better 3D printing than I can do.)
I grew a new alternator fan too but the inside filled in, a common issue with my 3D printer.
So I machined it out.
Brake pad masters ready to have a mold made.  Again, my 3D files grown by Fraxional.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Monday, October 19, 2020 5:22 PM

On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

fox
  • Member since
    January 2007
  • From: Narvon, Pa.
Posted by fox on Monday, October 19, 2020 5:33 PM

Uhhhhh, I have a question. When this is finished, can I borrow the keys for a weekend? 

Bow Down Bow Down Bow Down Bow Down Bow Down

Jim Captain

Stay Safe.

 Main WIP: 

   On the Bench:  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 70% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, October 20, 2020 10:58 AM

Thanks guys!!!

 

I grew the masters of the Wilwood calipers I designed but was not able to get the outsides to look their best without sacrificing the details on the insides where the pads mount.
I machined and hand finished  the insides to accept the pads and to fit together.
Fronts on top, rears on the bottom.
 
The caliper patterns are ready to make a mold from.
Same for the valve cover pattern.
 
Here are the calipers and one pair of pads I'll use on the car.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, October 20, 2020 9:30 PM
Since this is going to be a relatively modern street car, I designed a custom T-70 styled wheel with seven spokes (instead of six) and printed a pair of masters for the front and the rear.  (This is a front.)

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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