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68 VW, Revell ... first car model in almost 50 yrs (Turn Signal Amber-Bah Humbug)

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  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Nashua, NH
Posted by Mr Mike on Thursday, November 08, 2018 4:20 PM

I have watched this build from afar and I must say that it is an excellent WIP.  Chatter and all!  I built a Beetle earlier this year and yes, Greg, you did comment on it.  Thank you!  Your Beetle is looking great so far.  Looking forward to seeing it done.  Here's mine.

"That's Spenser with an "S", like the poet." Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On My Bench: 1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria; 1970 Dodge Charger R/T

Classic Plastic Model Club 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Currently in the Dallas area
Posted by modelcrazy on Thursday, November 08, 2018 4:42 PM

Greg, your interior is looking top notch Yes

Mr Mike, wow nice bug!!!

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/72 Revell Eurofighter Typhoon Twin Seater
1/72 Airfix BV-141
1/48 Tamiya Mk.1 Swordfish
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales

In Que

1/72 Airfix Dakota Mk. IV

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Thursday, November 08, 2018 6:51 PM

Mike, I absolutely do remember your blue Bug. It still looks great! Thanks for taking the time to comment, truly appreciated. I remember hoping mine turns out half as good. Still do.

BTW, all the guests here are making the thread work. You're all great.

Hey Steve, thanks for popping in my friend!

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Thursday, November 08, 2018 7:56 PM

Say Mr Mike,

If you're still around, I'm doing some test fitting and my body seems to be sitting a bit high at the rear end. Did you happen to run into that and do you have any hints? Your VW looks fine, not high in back at all.

I had to do some serious trimming to get the interior assy to fit at the rear. It is sitting down nicely now, I don't think that is it.

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Nashua, NH
Posted by Mr Mike on Friday, November 09, 2018 7:02 AM

Greg, my Beetle does sit a bit high in the back and I supect that it may be for the trailer hitch.  I don't recall having to do any cutting or trimming on my Beetle interior to get it to fit in the rear.  Looking forward to more from your Beetle!

"That's Spenser with an "S", like the poet." Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On My Bench: 1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria; 1970 Dodge Charger R/T

Classic Plastic Model Club 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, November 09, 2018 10:06 AM

Mr Mike

Greg, my Beetle does sit a bit high in the back and I supect that it may be for the trailer hitch.  I don't recall having to do any cutting or trimming on my Beetle interior to get it to fit in the rear.  Looking forward to more from your Beetle!

 

Thanks for your feedback, Mike.

-Greg

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, November 09, 2018 10:26 AM

Rotate your torsioin bars. lol.

On the real thing, the height above the ground was controlled by the angle of the swing arms, and when sitting empty those angles were set by twisting the torsion bar. It has a series of splines on the end towards the transaxle, and there are enough of them that the bar can be rotated one in either direction.

Rock climber. Low rider.

Empyty, the running boards (love it) should be level to the ground.

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, November 09, 2018 11:14 AM

Hey, look who stopped in!

I can't find the darned torsion bar adjustment. I'm calling Revell customer service. Oh wait, I can't.

GMorrison
Empyty, the running boards (love it) should be level to the ground.

Great line of thought, now I have some point of reference. I've been focused on the wheel well gaps.

The interior test fit is good. Aforementioned test fit problems were due to a couple of globs of CA gel, my bad. Body still isn't fitting right. All the fuss over the bad masking on the door panels was silly, can hardly see a thing in there.

Feel free to click on the image to see it larger.

 

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, November 11, 2018 8:09 PM

So what about those running boards? They are supplied as chrome parts in the kit. Model body will be black.

I just can't remember but not sure chrome seems right.

-Greg

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Sunday, November 11, 2018 8:44 PM

Greg
I just can't remember but not sure chrome seems right.

My memory is foggy on this ... but i seem to recall, the running board's were Flat Black, with Chrome trim piece's .

EDIT : like this.

Although ... I did find this...

  Dont know if those running board's are stock , dealer option , or aftermarket.

Sorry .... guess I'm no help at all...

 Dont worry about the thumbprint, paint it Rust , and call it "Battle Damage".

  

 

    

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 7:51 PM

Tim,

I looked up some aftermarket running boards and as you suggested, the styles are all over the place.

I really like the flat black with the chrome line of trim, and I think that just "looks" right too.. Thanks! That should be fun to do. And whatRUtalking about, that was a HUGE help! Yes

If I was every any good with glossy car bodies as a kid, I sure ain't now. My hat is off to you shiny car builders. I have some serious learning to do. I stripped it due to lint and started over. Second time was worse! Bang Head

-Greg

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 8:06 PM

Thats looking so good Greg!  Your interior detail is paying off looking through the windows.  I'm going to have to get one of these!

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 8:24 PM

keavdog

Thats looking so good Greg!  Your interior detail is paying off looking through the windows.  I'm going to have to get one of these!

 

Thanks for stopping in, John, and for noticing the interior details. I like those grab straps, man do those bring back memories.

This is really a great little kit, I'd recommend it. The aforementioned fit issues just went away. Trick seems to be install the interior up into the body first, then that assy down onto the chassis. Fits like a glove. I was test-fitting it bass-akwards before.

-Greg

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 8:35 PM

Running boards are flat black rubber with ridges the long way. That finish looks really good.

  • Member since
    August, 2009
  • From: MOAB, UTAH
Posted by JOE RIX on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 8:48 PM

Looking mighty terrific to me Greg. Appears to me that you've achieved a rather nice finish on the body. Certainly better than anything I'd turn out. Seriously, your overall work is primo.

I missed getting back to you on the running board colors but, Tim covered there. I'd have to agree that the standard flat black with chrome would look right sharp on it. You're making righteous progress now. Keep it coming.

"Not only do I not know what's going on, I wouldn't know what to do about it if I did". George Carlin

  • Member since
    March, 2012
  • From: Corpus Christi, Tx
Posted by mustang1989 on Thursday, November 15, 2018 7:10 AM

Greg that doesn't look bad at all. Remember that a large percentage of the time that your paint wont come out all the way smooth. Wet sand out the debris and orange peel with 3200 grit sanding pads and work your way through the ranges 4000, 6000, 8000 and then onto 12000 to smooth the finish out. Sand lightly and watch the corners and high points of the body so as not to "burn through" the color coat into the primer. Then wash the body with MILD soap and cold water. Cold water gets rid of the suds quicker than warm water does. Then dry it all off and clear coat it. Again wet sand any roughness/ debris out and then go onto polishing with the Novus Polish 2 and finish it off with Novus 1 and you're home free. Hang in there bud, you're doin' better than you think.

 

Being really stupid IS "the new smart"!!

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, November 15, 2018 8:29 AM

mustang1989

Greg that doesn't look bad at all. Remember that a large percentage of the time that your paint wont come out all the way smooth. Wet sand out the debris and orange peel with 3200 grit sanding pads and work your way through the ranges 4000, 6000, 8000 and then onto 12000 to smooth the finish out. Sand lightly and watch the corners and high points of the body so as not to "burn through" the color coat into the primer. Then wash the body with MILD soap and cold water. Cold water gets rid of the suds quicker than warm water does. Then dry it all off and clear coat it. Again wet sand any roughness/ debris out and then go onto polishing with the Novus Polish 2 and finish it off with Novus 1 and you're home free. Hang in there bud, you're doin' better than you think.

 

Yes--everything that Mustang Joe said.

Let me tell you a story. (Yeah yeah, I know. Not another Bakster story). Lol.

Many years ago, during my first modeling tour I built mostly cars. My goal was to paint showroom smooth finishes. If I had a gun back then, I might not be here today. Broken Heart Every single time something ended up on the model ruining the finish. FINALLY-- after much heartache--the solution presented itself. I found and purchased a polishing kit.

Oh Momma... that's the ticket. I created perfect glass smooth finishes. All those little pieces of lint that menaced me were no longer a problem. The solution was so simple, you just sand them out. The process is exactly how Joe outlined. And let me tell you--it is not that hard to do. 

The kit that I purchased is similar to the one in the link below. You don't have to go with this kit, but it gives you what you need in one crack.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/model-car-Paint-Polishing-Kit-abrasive-cloths-liquid-polish-etc-for-Pocher-/192069951376

 

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Currently in the Dallas area
Posted by modelcrazy on Thursday, November 15, 2018 8:57 AM

It looks great in the photos Greg, but I know what you mean. I have the same issue. Joe knows what he's talking about, his stuff is outstanding, unfortunately I just can't get his technique down yet.

Keep it up, it's looking great.

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/72 Revell Eurofighter Typhoon Twin Seater
1/72 Airfix BV-141
1/48 Tamiya Mk.1 Swordfish
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales

In Que

1/72 Airfix Dakota Mk. IV

  • Member since
    March, 2012
  • From: Corpus Christi, Tx
Posted by mustang1989 on Thursday, November 15, 2018 1:29 PM

Thanks for the votes of confidence guys. I still have a ways to go to where I'm totally comfortable with my paint but it's been a process over time for the last 4-1/2 years. My first paint job in auto modeling was nothing more than pure chance or a great mistake. Everything just went perfect. After that for a while everything was a PIA in trying to acheive the quality of that first paint job. My process is not hard at all. The changes I made over time to my current methods are:

1. I use an entry level AB-Say a Badger 350. Here's the exact set up I use:

2. Those paint bottles that you see are to be kept surgically clean. That means a thorough cleaning and before you use them BLOW ANY DUST out of them using canned air or compressed air from the AB. Just make sure they don't have any dust/ debris in them.

3. I tend to use ONLY the Testor's One Coat Lacquer System in a can for all my exterior paints. That includes color and clears. For clear coats on Stock/ O.E.M. vehicles I'll just stick to an ordinary Gloss. Most of the time I build custom cars so those get Testor's Wet Look Clear Lacquer. This stuff gives PERFECT results every time when decanted(more on that in just a sec). I've had very little luck just spraying this stuff from the can due to all the dang air bubbles that comes out of the can. Every once in a while I'll stray to a Tamiya color if I can't get a particular shade I like and then I'll use a Tamiya clear over that. Different folks will use different stuff but this is what works for me.

Unless there's been a whole lot of filler putty I don't use any primer coat. For OOB bodies I'll merely clean up all the flash and seam lines and go from there.

4. This is the point in which I'll decant the color/ clear into the paint jar. BEFORE this is done though, make dang sure you've got adequate ventilation. I also make sure I've got a good dust free environment to work in. Dogs, cats and other furry creatures must be out of the room for dust AND health reasons. You can't get a paint respirator on 'em so get 'em the heck out of there. After all that I'll decant the paint into the jar. I make sure that I decant it inside the paint booth so I don't make a mess all over the place. After decanting place the lid loosely on top of the jar and wait 3-5 minutes for the air bubbles to work themselves out. After that I'm ready to start shooting paint. For car bodies it's important to be able to turn them constantly during the painting process. So here's what I use The paint stand. I bought two pipe fittings. Donn Yost (I'll send you a link on point #2 to his website) uses pipe fittings as paint stands and they work great. I bought two plastic ones but they allow a one handed ability to turn the model while painting with ease so I use plastic pipe fittings for a paint stand.

Just put tape across the top in an "X" pattern so the model won't move while on top of the fitting like so:

 

 

and then simply put the car body on top of the fixture and press down on the roof to get good adherence and you're off to the races.

Now that I've got the body on the fixture and my paint decanted, it's time to start laying some color. I'll always start by misting the color on in layers starting at the bottom of the body all the way around. In the past I've gotten what I thought was the perfect color/ gloss coat only to find out that I totally missed the lower panels of the body   and that my friends..............is a bummer!

I keep misting and building paint until I get what I feel is a good coating of the color onto the body making SURE I get all the nooks and crannies. At that point I open the air brush up and get a decent wet coat going without going overboard. By overboard I mean so thick that the paint starts to run. You don't want that. If I do get a hair or big piece of dust in the paint I'll try to flick it out with my X-Acto knife. If it's being stubborn to get out....I leave it in the paint. Don't worry, it's easier to wet sand out than it is to bolloch up a paint job trying to get it out while the paint is still wet. After I get my color coat on to my liking I put it in an enclosed spot and LEAVE IT ALONE for 2-3 days and don't jack with it at all.

The results are like below and this is just the color coat.

It's after the 2-3 days gas out time that I'll spot any debris/ dust or whatever in the paint and 99.9% of the time I can wet sand it out of the color coat.

5. After this comes the clear coat. For this car I used Testor's Wet Look Lacquer decanted into a paint jar. Wet Look has a NASTY habit of foaming/ bubbling right out of the can and will surely ruin a color coat if sprayed from the can. The same thing, however, holds true with the decanting method. I just decant it into the paint jar and wait 3-5 minutes for all the air bubbles to disappear.  I use the same process for the clear as I did the color coat for applying it to the model. I apply mist coats starting from the bottom of the body and working my way around-KEEPING THE BODY MOVING around as I coat. Again when its fairly well covered in a base mist coat open the AB up and I start with my wet coat while keeping the body moving round and round. Hair, dust strand or debris can be picked out with the X-Acto knife but again.......if the piece is going to be stubborn then WAIT til it's dry.When I'm satisfied with my coat I put it into the "dust free zone" in my drying chamber and then I don't touch it for 3 days.

It's after this process that I'll start my wet sanding and polishing process as mentioned in the above post to bring it out to an even higher shine.

And that's the whole process in a nut shell folks. Hopefully this has been helpful to you guys.

 

 

Being really stupid IS "the new smart"!!

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, November 15, 2018 1:44 PM

This is very helpful. My motorcycle frame had a lot of little tiny bubble type bumps in places in the Testors Gloss Black. I followed your advice, and although I did daylight some primer here and there, I was then able to put down another coat of black that is mirror smooth.

 

Thanks!

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, November 15, 2018 2:23 PM

GMorrison
although I did daylight some primer here and there, I was then able to put down another coat of black that is mirror smooth.

Say Bill--you nailed something that I was going to mention. If you sand through to the primer--(been there done that)--all you do is what you did. You spray another coat of color. It's no biggie. This process is pretty much foolproof, and that is the beauty of it.

The noted sanding and polishing method takes the pain out of getting a good gloss finish. It helps in other ways as well. Often, we try to bring out gloss by laying a heavy layer of paint. That puts the model at risk of the worst case, paint running. The lessor but still important issue is that you lose detail. With this method gloss is acheived through polishing. So, we don't have to put as much paint on. 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2012
  • From: Corpus Christi, Tx
Posted by mustang1989 on Thursday, November 15, 2018 2:50 PM

That's what I did on my '56 Ford when the first hood flame job went south. Just another coat of paint applied and moved on.

 

Being really stupid IS "the new smart"!!

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, November 15, 2018 3:19 PM

mustang1989

That's what I did on my '56 Ford when the first hood flame job went south. Just another coat of paint applied and moved on.

 

Joe, question for you. Do you clear coat over decals as well? I remember that I did. It somewhat buries the decal within the clear and helps to eliminate the edges. I remember laying a clear heavy enough to completlty eliminate the edges. Curious what you do. 

That is a nice tutorial that you laid out. Thanks for the tip about Testors One Coat. I will buy some. My next major project promises to be a car. I might be menacing you here in the automotive section with a WIP. Run for the hills! Confused

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2012
  • From: Corpus Christi, Tx
Posted by mustang1989 on Thursday, November 15, 2018 3:23 PM

Heya Steve, yes I do clear coat over them if it's a custom build. O.E.M. cars like say a Challenger T/A or 340 Duster I don't. I did that on my Challenger T/A and although that car turned out good for me it was still incorrect as the decals didn't have the matte finish that they were supposed to. I've since learned and will correct it on my next O.E.M. vehicle.

Looking forward to seeing what you're gonna build.

 

Being really stupid IS "the new smart"!!

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Thursday, November 15, 2018 5:08 PM

Tim and Bill, so I masked off the chrome running boards being silly enought to think that flat black primer would stick to kit chrome. Haha. The running boards are in the stripping tub and fortuitously I just ordered my first pack of that rub on chrome stuff to try.

Joe, that's some great advice and please add me to the list of folks saying thank you for the step by step guide. I did stuff I won't do again. I hate to admit this, but I brush painted a coat of er, ah, duh.....Future floor polish over a shiny black surface of Alclad Black Gloss primer. I don't think I'm going back on this model, but I sure have a bunch of great info not for the next car model, and there will be one for sure.

Joe and Steve, you have both mentioned how important polishing/sanding is and taught me not to expect the final finish after a spray coat.

Steve, thanks for your ongoing encouragement and I surely will pay attention to da boss (Joe, in this case).

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, November 16, 2018 10:38 AM

Joe, FTI your tute has been printed and is on my way to 3-ring binder downstairs and already duly filed on laptop.

YesYesYes

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, November 16, 2018 2:09 PM

Ok, 4 wheel guys. Question.

I am test fitting front windshield, getting a feel for the good 'ol clear parts. If you click to zoom in, in addition to all the paint imperfections, you will see a border around the windshield. The instructions vaguely call out for the body color around the outside of same.

So, I really have to do this? Masking like an aircraft canopy???

-Greg

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, November 16, 2018 2:34 PM

Yes, you do. But it's flat black and silver.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, November 16, 2018 2:37 PM

It's a black rubber gasket, and that has a little chrome trim in the center of it.

  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: East Bethel, MN
Posted by midnightprowler on Friday, November 16, 2018 3:18 PM

This is looking great! For the windshield, use a black chisel sharpie pen and then lightly go over that with a 1mm Molotow pen.

Hi, I am Lee, I am a plastiholic.

Co. A, 682 Engineers, Ltchfield, MN, 1980-1986

1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 1 Corinthians 15:51-54

Ask me about Speedway Decals

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