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Lola T-70 MkIII

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  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Friday, October 9, 2020 8:11 PM

YES!!! I love 1/12 scale kits. Why did you discard the kit's engine? 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, October 9, 2020 8:27 PM

That was always one of my favorite racing body styles of all time. It will be fun to see what you do with it.

Thanks for the memories, I'd all but forgotten about Lola.

-Greg

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 9, 2020 8:32 PM

JohnnyK

YES!!! I love 1/12 scale kits. Why did you discard the kit's engine? 

 

 

I'm making a better one.  

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 9, 2020 8:33 PM
Proper double hung hinges for the also reworked engine cover were fabricated from brass, stainless steel and styrene.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March 2017
  • From: Oregon: Beautiful tree country.
Posted by treehuggerdave on Friday, October 9, 2020 8:59 PM

Beautiful work on this.

Back in the mid 60's I got to ride in one of these.

A red one with a Chevy engine.

Colin Chapman sent it to the U.S., and a friend of John Brunson the owner of Lancer Compnay, a slot car manufacturer, had a connection, and an Italian sportscar driver drove  it out on the freeway to Lancer company in  San Bernardino, and gave several of us a CRAZY RIDE in it.

 

He was actually roadblocked on the way out by police and a helicopter, but talked his way out of a ticket or jail time by giving everyone a ride - TRUE STORY

Man could that car handle and corner - SCARY.

We pulled next to a 1956 Ford while in town, and I was looking at the center of the door. They are LOW.

 

Beautiful work.

I'll continue following along.

Phil. 4:6-7   Jer. 29:11-14  John 3:13

On the bench - Hand made '50 Lincoln "Tail dragger"  1956 DeSoto 'vert., Resin '60 Chrysler 300 , Modelhaus resin '58 Pontiac hardtop kit.

Been a "Plastholic" all my life. Love this stuff.

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by Surface_Line on Saturday, October 10, 2020 12:48 AM

I don't want to hijack your thread, and to switch from your coupe to the spyder, but can one of you help me with any recognition factors between the T-70 Spider Mk I and Mk II and Mk III?

Thanks,
Rick

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 10, 2020 11:48 AM

Surface_Line

I don't want to hijack your thread, and to switch from your coupe to the spyder, but can one of you help me with any recognition factors between the T-70 Spider Mk I and Mk II and Mk III?

Thanks,
Rick

 

 

No worries Rick.  I'm really more familiar with the coupes than the spyders.  But an easy tell between a MkIII and MkIIIB is the larger headlights on the latter if that helps.  And there have been a lot of modifications on many of them later in life so it can get blurry.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 10, 2020 11:52 AM
These are the gas struts for the doors.
Upper hinges, acid cut brass.
The strut bodies are brass, the shafts are stainless steel.
The lower hinges are machined aluminum.
Closed.  They compress well.
Open.  They slide smoothly and provide just enough friction to keep the door open.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, October 10, 2020 12:38 PM

Following this build!  Nice work so far  

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 10, 2020 7:13 PM
After doing the more shimming, shaping and fitting work to the now hinged engine cover, I reworked the rear spoiler(s).

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Sunday, October 11, 2020 11:36 AM

You are definately bringing some mad skills to the table on this forum. This is one of the prettiest shapes ever done for racing. I am watching with great interest.

BK

On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 12, 2020 11:45 AM
The kit engine is a Small Block Chevy, but it doesn't quite look right on its own and it builds up differently than a "normal" American kit.   (Both issues probably due to it being designed to house an electric motor.)  Plus the heads were molded to the block halves and the rear of the block is a separate piece creating interesting seams.
I borrowed the 302 engine parts from a Monogram '69 Z/28 Camaro kit and made molds then cast resin copies.  When it's done it will be a stroked and bored and somewhat updated 385 c.i. (like in one of my real cars).
I cut off the oil filter, bellhousing & engine mounts from the oil pan, and the transmission & bellhousing from the block halves as well as the fuel pump from the front of the block.  The timing tab was also removed from the timing cover and the bolts (round bumps) were cut off and holes drilled in their place.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 12, 2020 11:47 AM
The rear of the block didn't look bad when it had a bellhousing molded to it, (and was going to be hidden by a firewall), but it turns out it is not at all symmetrical.  Since the rear of this engine will be very exposed when in the car I had to address it.  I added 0.020 sheet styrene and reworked it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 12, 2020 2:05 PM
The resin heads I cast have been reworked by removing all the molded on "bolts" (more round bumps) and drilling out for the aluminum replacements I'll machine.  The spark plug holes have been relocated to their proper locations too.  The exhaust ports have been hogged out and the holes for the accessory mounting brackets added.
(The white head is the stock Camaro one.)

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 12, 2020 2:05 PM
I started working over the Z/28 water pump I copied in resin, but I realized it wasn't the best choice for this application let alone an accurate piece even for what it is supposed to represent.  The shorter Corvette pump with the oversized bearing was more appropriate even though in the end it will hardly be visible, and it will buy me more space since the engine I'm using is longer than the kit provided one.
The Tamiya water pump actually was closer looking to the short style even though it didn't measure out or and has some "interesting" details.
Here's the Lola kit part.
Having a real pump at my feet made it a lot easier to modify the part into a more accurate rendition.  It still needs the mounting hardware and heater hose fitting to be machined and the sand cast texture to be added.
I also started reworking the harmonic balancer.  I shaved it down to a proper 8" diameter and installed a brass sleeve.  I also cut the timing mark into it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 12:50 PM
I machined a billet aluminum water pump pulley and matching crank pulley.
Both loosely sitting on the engine.

And at the other end of the engine...

I designed a correct Lola bellhousing in SolidWorks and had Fraxional 3D print it. 
It aligns to the block with two dowel pins like the real ones.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, October 14, 2020 12:23 PM
Since the exhaust port spacing on my heads is different on than the Tamiya parts I had to modify the rear of the inboard tubes to meet the collectors.
I used the header flanges I designed in SolidWorks and were printed by Fraxional and fitted the tubes to them and the heads.
 
Removable front engine cover for the interior. 
Since the engine I'm building is larger than the kit provided item, and I'm using a dual belt pulley set-up, I had to make room for the water pump pulley.
Before:
After:
 
I had Fraxional grow me a second bellhousing after I reengineered the center section where the transmission mounts to it.  (Very easy to deal with this 3D printing service.)
Like elsewhere throughout this project, magnets are used to hold these sub-assemblies together.
 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, October 15, 2020 10:25 AM
Rear hub carriers.  Step one, remove the brake calipers.
 
Reworked and assembled rear hub carriers.  Brass tubing was added for the hinge points and open holes.
 
 
Front spindles.  Step one, remove the brake calipers.
 
Front upper control arms as they come in the kit.
 
New fittings and bushings for the front pivot points.  Machined aluminum & brass with steel reinforcements.
Both arms with upgraded front bushings and adjusters.
And new fittings for the rear pivot points, same construction as the front ones.
Upper control arms dry fitted.
 
 
These are the tie-rod ends with adjusters for toe.  Brass and aluminum loosely assembled.
I acid treated them instead of using paint.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Thursday, October 15, 2020 10:58 PM

The work you are doing here is mind blowing. I'd love to see how you machine those aluminum parts.

BK

On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 16, 2020 10:49 AM

Thanks Brandon!  I use a Sherline Lathe and Mill, (non-CNC).

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 17, 2020 3:23 PM
A few more 3D parts I designed and had printed by Fraxional.
Flywheel with pressure plate & clutch (with the correct small 153 tooth flywheel).
Front side installed in bellhousing.
New corrected Hewland rear transaxle cover.  (The one in the kit said Hewlang.)
It's engineered to mount with magnets.  (I had the bosses for the magnets grown into the part.)
Full engine & transaxle dry fitted together.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Saturday, October 17, 2020 3:30 PM

Bow Down Bow DownStar

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 19, 2020 11:42 AM
Half shaft yokes I designed and were 3D printed by Fraxional.  The shafts are brass; the larger one has already been treated with acid for the color.  Just dry fitted together.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Lil Rebel on Monday, October 19, 2020 3:35 PM

I'm glad to see you over here. I've followed this build since you started, and was affraid I'd never see it finished. One of my favorite cars of the 60's, and you are doing an amazing labor of love to this not so accurate kit. I will be watching as you progress. Thanks for not just sharing your build but for chosing the Lola to show case your abilities.

                                                                                       Mike

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 19, 2020 4:45 PM
Here's the valve cover I designed and printed using the ones on my real car for reference.  It's hard to capture the details in the clear resin in photos.  The model will end up with cast copies in opaque urethane resin.
This is the inside of the valve cover master.  While I designed it with mounting features they filled in when the part was grown.  So I milled those features in by hand.
These are the resin versions of the valve covers.
The magnets are installed in one of them and mate to the ones in the heads.
 
These are the alternator parts I designed and had grown by Fraxional, but I neglected to send one of the part files so the clear piece is the inner/center section that I grew rather than wait for them to make it.  (Fraxional does better 3D printing than I can do.)
I grew a new alternator fan too but the inside filled in, a common issue with my 3D printer.
So I machined it out.
Brake pad masters ready to have a mold made.  Again, my 3D files grown by Fraxional.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Monday, October 19, 2020 5:22 PM

On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

fox
  • Member since
    January 2007
  • From: Narvon, Pa.
Posted by fox on Monday, October 19, 2020 5:33 PM

Uhhhhh, I have a question. When this is finished, can I borrow the keys for a weekend? 

Bow Down Bow Down Bow Down Bow Down Bow Down

Jim Captain

Stay Safe.

 Main WIP: 

   On the Bench:  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 70% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, October 20, 2020 10:58 AM

Thanks guys!!!

 

I grew the masters of the Wilwood calipers I designed but was not able to get the outsides to look their best without sacrificing the details on the insides where the pads mount.
I machined and hand finished  the insides to accept the pads and to fit together.
Fronts on top, rears on the bottom.
 
The caliper patterns are ready to make a mold from.
Same for the valve cover pattern.
 
Here are the calipers and one pair of pads I'll use on the car.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, October 20, 2020 9:30 PM
Since this is going to be a relatively modern street car, I designed a custom T-70 styled wheel with seven spokes (instead of six) and printed a pair of masters for the front and the rear.  (This is a front.)

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    June 2008
Posted by lewbud on Tuesday, October 20, 2020 11:35 PM

This is way more interesting than reading an article after the fact.  Thanks for bringing us along.  I had a couple of questions, but your last post answered one of them (was wondering if this was a vintage racer as it is now vs. factory spec. Never thought of a street car.)  The second is why the use of magnets?  Is it to make mocking things up easier as you go along?  I'm really looking forward to more.

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

  • Member since
    October 2020
  • From: Warsaw Poland
Posted by Grzegorz on Wednesday, October 21, 2020 3:22 AM

Scale-Master
Since this is going to be a relatively modern street car, I designed a custom T-70 styled wheel with seven spokes (instead of six) and printed a pair of masters for the front and the rear.  (This is a front.)
 

This is great.

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, October 21, 2020 10:09 AM

Thanks guys!

I'm actually a bit farther along on this project than the narrative and photos show, I'm trying to get it caught up here so I can post in "real time" as I progress.

Yes, the magnets are for mocking up and fitting purposes in most cases, but I've found some other uses for them with moving parts.  I was using tiny screws, but they didn't stand up to the rigors of assembly/diassembly.  The heads were stripping out after a dozen uses plus the plastic threads were wearing out.  Even though it takes longer to install magnets, the time saved by using them is worth it.  I can tear down and rebuild most of the car in a couple minutes now.  

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, October 21, 2020 10:10 AM
The start of the aluminum rims.  Some T6-6061 stock and a wooden angle block with 22 and 27 degree angles cut into it.  The block was indexed to the tilt-table as a secondary measure to ensure the angles were uniform on all the wheels.
First round of cutting; this will be a rear.
All five wheels, two rears and three fronts, (one for the spare).
I added the radius/fillets and then polished them up.
And a dry fitted front…
 
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Wednesday, October 21, 2020 10:15 AM

This is modeling on a whole new level.

BK

On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, October 22, 2020 10:05 AM

Thanks Brandon!

 

Once in primer I still was not satisfied so I re-engineered the wheel to be three pieces instead of two.
This is the new spoke piece as it was grown.
And then machined.
This is the rear section of the new rim design; it still needs to be final machined.
The U.V. resin is very hard and brittle.  That part did not survive the machining process.
I started growing a beefier part and realized I could probably machine one from scratch faster.
I was correct, made this from scratch before the printer could grow one.
The first front and rear resin copies.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, October 22, 2020 8:18 PM

The half-shafts are done for now. I cast the yokes in resin (dyed black) the 3D masters.

The shafts are brass acid treated for the dark finish.

Each U-joint has four bearings/caps (with E clips) and they work. The half-shafts telescope too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    June 2008
Posted by lewbud on Friday, October 23, 2020 12:44 AM

Those half shafts are incredible.  A couple more questions.  In one of your earlier posts, you mentioned that the brass piece was acid cut.  Does this mean you are making your own photo etch?  The second is about the tire in the photo of the wheel mock up.  Is that the kit tire or did you scratch build it and cast it in black resin?

 

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 23, 2020 10:46 AM

Yes, I used to make my own photo-etch, but I have come up with a similar process that does away with the photo-resist portion of the process and provides at least as good as results.  It still uses the same chemicals to cut the brass.  It can be used to make some parts much easier than "traditional" methods like this rearend cover.

The tire is from the Tamiya kit.  I have made my own tires, (like these)...

But the Lola kit tires are really nice and it would be a shame not to use them.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 23, 2020 10:47 AM
The half-shafts are done for now.  The yokes are cast resin (dyed black) copies of 3D masters.
The shafts are brass acid treated for the dark finish. 
Each U-joint has four bearings/caps (with E clips) and they work.  The half-shafts telescope too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    June 2008
Posted by lewbud on Friday, October 23, 2020 1:41 PM

The rear end cover is simply amazing.  Thanks for answering my questions.  

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 24, 2020 11:00 AM

Thank you!  And you're welcome!

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 24, 2020 11:02 AM
I was going to have to adjust the rotor hubs (or make shims) so I decided to mill a new one out of resin stock instead of editing the 3D file and growing a replacement.  This was quicker too.
I machined the rotors from high-pressure-cast aluminum-impregnated resin stock that I cast.
I milled the vents around the perimeter and faced them.
I cross-drilled and slotted them.  They are directional.
This is the natural cut finish of the material.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 24, 2020 9:06 PM
I painted the Wilwood calipers with a ceramic finish look.  They are Corvette retrofit units I designed in SolidWorks and 3D printed before hand-finishing the masters then casting resin copies. 
I used the somewhat new Tamiya LP-6 Pure Blue for the color of the ceramic finish (like I have on my real car).

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, October 25, 2020 10:34 AM
The new 3D printed caliper brackets I designed and grew to mount the calipers have been attached to the front spindles.
I carefully saved the rear caliper mounts on the hub carriers when I cut off the molded on calipers from the kit.  But those had to go too because the larger Wilwood calipers couldn't be mounted to them.  

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 26, 2020 11:05 AM
Composite brake pads.  They have been seated and used just a little bit…
The pads are installed and the calipers have been dry set up on their respective bracketry.
The rotors, hubs, calipers and pads are all scratch-built. The slide pins are polished steel, but still more hardware to machine for the calipers.
Rears:
Fronts:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, October 27, 2020 10:35 AM
I had to make the coil over shocks next in order to continue mocking up the suspension.
Shock bodies…
Spring tension adjusters/lock rings.  The taller ones fit inside the springs.
Tops of the shocks with the piston shafts.
All press-fitted machined aluminum with the kit provided springs (also friction fit).
I'll paint the springs later.  At least now I can continue engineering and building other pieces of the car…
Yes, there are rubber bushings for the eyelets.
Front shocks installed…
Rear shocks installed…
I also turned an aluminum pulley to drive the alternator and it's mounted to the half-shaft.
Finally, and for the first time it is up on its wheels so I can get an idea of where the ride height is.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, October 28, 2020 11:09 AM
Back to working on the alternator; because it has become relevant to the suspension.
More fabrication…
Alternator bracket.  I designed it in SolidWorks and grew it.
Alternator drive pulley.
Assembled alternator bolted to the bracket.  I machined the hardware.
(The fan spins too.)  Still some detail painting to do…
 
I had to make an offset pulley for the alternator to clear the transmission mounts. 
Alternator assembly loosely fitted to the car.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Wednesday, October 28, 2020 1:09 PM

Hmmm;

 I have a Kia Soul.Could I do my alternator like that? LOL.LOL. Very awesome indeed!

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:09 AM

Sure, it's an OEM alternator, just use your shrink ray to make a copy...

 

I drew up the base of the intake manifold and did a test print to make sure it matched the heads.
I also made a license plate…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, October 29, 2020 3:15 PM
First print of the full manifold.
Test printed the carb parts I designed at the same time.  In the end it looks like I'll have to machine hardware for them like usual.
Although I was half surprised the lower linkage and springs grew…
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 30, 2020 10:31 AM
While I was able to engineer in the correct angles for the intake manifold to mate to the block and heads when I designed it; the printer left too much slag on the bottom surfaces and I had to fixture it up in my mill to cut those angles for a proper fit.  This material is very brittle and I was relieved that it took the vise and milling as well as it did.
I also added a couple more magnets to it.
The block received two more magnets too.  As well as brass tubing under the thermostat housing and the distributor to positively locate and align the manifold.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 30, 2020 10:17 PM
While I was able to engineer in the correct angles for the intake manifold to mate to the block and heads when I designed it; the printer left too much slag on the bottom surfaces and I had to fixture it up in my mill to cut those angles for a proper fit.  This material is very brittle and I was relieved that it took the vise and milling as well as it did because I've had a few part disintegrate during similar machining.
I also added a couple more magnets to it.
The block received two more magnets too.  As well as brass tubing under the thermostat housing and the distributor to positively locate and align the manifold.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 31, 2020 10:32 AM
I used a carb I test grew as one piece to double check alignment and added brass tubing for a positive fit.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 31, 2020 2:55 PM
The radius rods in the kit are clunky chromed plastic with C type snap "fittings". And they are somewhat flexible. I drew up adjustable rod ends and joints and printed some out. I printed one set assembled together for the rear joints to make mocking it up and sizing the rods easier. The main radius rods are steel rod and the receivers for the control links are brass rod.   Built up the rear suspension rods and ends, and they work with the rest of the moving suspension parts. Steel rods, cast resin joints made from 3D printed masters I designed and grew and brass pivot points.    Made new lower control arms from steel and cast resin ends.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 1:52 PM
These are the final masters for the Weber carbs, I grew them from the 3D files I created from scratch.
These are the cast resin tops.  The venturi tubes are stainless steel.  I used a very thin coat of primer then a thin coat of silver to see how they look.  Still more fine tuning to do.
These are the cast resin main bodies; same as the tops, more work to do…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    June 2008
Posted by lewbud on Thursday, November 5, 2020 1:08 AM

A couple of more questions for you. I've noticed that when you mocked up your suspension (and other parts) that there were no nuts or bolts yet.  Do you use the nuts and bolts that are commercially available or will you make your own?  The second regards the parts you grow on the printer. Why the use of a translucent material?  Does it give better detail than a more opaque material?  The reason I ask is that while it's cool seeing the part as it comes from the printer, it's hard to see the detail you've designed into the part until it's been painted.  Also, do you worry about the growth lines or does your printer or the commercial printing company you use print layers fine enough that you don't have to clean them up? The carbs look great.

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Thursday, November 5, 2020 8:38 AM

Okay;

 Enough already! This is going down as the most fascinating I have ever seen. My Budget doesn't allow for those thingies. The Car parts I mean. Well , the Printer too. What is truly fascinating to me is how quickly the machines have progressed to the point they are at.

    You could build a model car truly from scratch. Making every Panel, Piece and Nut, Bolt and Brace and Bracket! WOW ! For Ships this would mean I could do a Coast Guard 85' WHPC and do every Frame, The Keel and even the Plates for the Hull!

       Biggest problem? Cost of the Printer, the Material, and the Smarts around Computer driven stuff, The last, I Definitely Don't have! Oh! You'll have to go to a Jewelery or Watch supply company for Nuts, Bolts and such.

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, November 5, 2020 11:28 AM

Tanker-Builder

Okay;

 Enough already! This is going down as the most fascinating I have ever seen. My Budget doesn't allow for those thingies. The Car parts I mean. Well , the Printer too. What is truly fascinating to me is how quickly the machines have progressed to the point they are at.

    You could build a model car truly from scratch. Making every Panel, Piece and Nut, Bolt and Brace and Bracket! WOW ! For Ships this would mean I could do a Coast Guard 85' WHPC and do every Frame, The Keel and even the Plates for the Hull!

       Biggest problem? Cost of the Printer, the Material, and the Smarts around Computer driven stuff, The last, I Definitely Don't have! Oh! You'll have to go to a Jewelery or Watch supply company for Nuts, Bolts and such.

 

 

 

Okay;

Since you mention it, I have built models 100% completely from scratch.   Including making all the items most people source from other kits. 

The last one I built did not even use 3D technology of any kind on it.  I did it fully with "old school" modeling; even the parts I machined were done manually on a twenty-something year old entry level mill.  

(It earned the Best of Show and several other awards at the 2015 GSL.)

You're right about the speed of growth of the new technology, but at the same time prices are dropping too; a really good 3D printer is far less expensive than a decent lathe, or than you may think.  And the materials are very inepensive when you realize how far they go.  I spend more annually on resin casting supplies by a significant amount.

Free 3D software is available, (although I use some kind of pricey software for my "real" job and use it for modeling too).  Check out Sketchup, it's still free. Most come with easy to follow tutorials so just about anyone can figure it out.  That's how I learned...

Jewelry and watch parts usually do not look like scaled down hex nuts and bolts, so they don't work for me, especially for smaller scale projects.  Plus they are far more expensive than me making my own from scratch, in addition I get enjoyment from creating what I want as compared to settling for what might work.

If you actually wanted to make these kinds of parts, time is probably the biggest investment you'll need to make.  Actual out of pocket cost is not that much.  I built the model above for under $350.00 in raw materials. 

Tamiya makes a wonderful kit of a similar car in the same scale, it will set you back close to $700.00 plus the paint and other items to assemble it. Dollar for dollar I got more building value out of mine than from a kit.

If you're interested in this type of modeling I'd suggest you do some real research into this stuff; I think you'll be surprised how affordable it really is.  If you have the time it will most certainly pay off.

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, November 5, 2020 11:43 AM

lewbud
  
A couple of more questions for you. I've noticed that when you mocked up your suspension (and other parts) that there were no nuts or bolts yet.  Do you use the nuts and bolts that are commercially available or will you make your own?  The second regards the parts you grow on the printer. Why the use of a translucent material?  Does it give better detail than a more opaque material?  The reason I ask is that while it's cool seeing the part as it comes from the printer, it's hard to see the detail you've designed into the part until it's been painted.  Also, do you worry about the growth lines or does your printer or the commercial printing company you use print layers fine enough that you don't have to clean them up? The carbs look great.  

  

 

 

I answered these out of sequence since the answers to the second post also were also relevent to the prior.

Yes, I make all my own hardware.  But during the mock-up stage I'll sometimes use phillip head or other out of scale fasteners that are easier to install and remove.  They are discarded during final assembly for the more accurate looking parts I'll make.

 

The printer came with the translucent resin material.  Frankly I don't care for it.  It's very brittle.  It's my understanding that the resins for my printer yield the same results whether clear or opaque.  Since I'm primarily using them as masters for cast parts I'll use up what I have before changing resins.

 

There are grow lines, but the hight of the print layers can be adjusted.  It's a trade off as it takes longer to grow finer parts and there are limitiations too.  Also oreintaion of the parts is important to hide the lines. 

The parts Fraxional grew for me were done at a higher resulotion than I use most of the time.  Very little clean-up was required, mosty just addressing support points (like cleaning up an injection molded part where it was attached to the sprue).

I think I have found an acceptable balance of resolution knowing how much will be filled in by paint without losing details.  Sometimes there is a good amount of hand and/or machine finishing reqired, but I design & compensate that into the part before it is grown.

 

And thanks!

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Tanker-Builder on Thursday, November 5, 2020 11:53 AM

Well Said:

        I think you have made some very good points. When I built models on Commission the folks around me thought I was Nuts! I mean c'mon a real working hydraulic system in 1/8 scale? That's what the client needed. The worse part of that was using R.C. it had to fail at a critical point. In front of a Jury!

        After five months they got what they asked for! The thing worked just like the real one. Then, Failed like the real one! That was for me the pinnacle of my career. I have done what you have done. Looking back at my builds, I just didn't realize it til now.

 How sad that I don't have space for even a small 8'x8' shop now, much less, anything larger. No place to put the mill, Even if it still worked. it's been packed up for so long I believe it may not perform as it used to. And then the cutters. Heaven knows where they are.

      You know what though? You have re-kindled my memories and in some ways dormant skills .Thank You So Much. I am going to follow this build til you get done and have a flat tire on your inaugeral drive LOL.LOL.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, November 6, 2020 11:11 AM
I designed the intake horns in SolidWorks and printed the master, then cast copies in resin.
The one in the foreground is a 3D master.

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Posted by lewbud on Saturday, November 7, 2020 11:33 AM

I was wondering if you were going to machine those or cast them.  I remember seeing your yellow Caterham in the magazines, but didn't remember it being scratchbuilt.  I thought it was a continuation of the series of Tamiya Lotus's that you did.  I did get to see your Lotus at the Nats in OKC and was amazed by your work.

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, November 7, 2020 6:19 PM

lewbud

I was wondering if you were going to machine those or cast them.  I remember seeing your yellow Caterham in the magazines, but didn't remember it being scratchbuilt.  I thought it was a continuation of the series of Tamiya Lotus's that you did.  I did get to see your Lotus at the Nats in OKC and was amazed by your work.

 

Even at the few shows I took it to people asked how I "converted" the scratch-built one to left hand drive.  I don't think some people read or listen that well sometimes.

There are also the two yellow JPE Caterhams I built using Tamiya kits as the base almost 20 years ago.  (I gave one to Mr. Tamiya after the first one earned me a trip to Japan at the '01 TamiyaCon.)

Did we meet at the '03 IPMS Nats in OK?

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Posted by lewbud on Saturday, November 7, 2020 7:27 PM

It is entirely possible that we did, but honestly I don't recall.  I do remember a couple of your models though.

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, November 7, 2020 9:41 PM

lewbud

It is entirely possible that we did, but honestly I don't recall.  I do remember a couple of your models though.

 

That's nice to hear, thanks.  Yeah, I had a few models entered there since we drove (vs fly).  I met a lot of people that weekend, but I'm better with faces than names, and that's not much help here, or now... 

The show was memorable and an obvious favorite for me; winning the Judges Grand Best of Show with a car there... 

My Dad won in '69 so it is the only time a father and then son have won the award.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, November 8, 2020 9:00 PM
The block got a new brass dipstick channel. 
The dipstick tube is stainless steel.
And the (removable) dipstick is nickel and brass.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, November 11, 2020 9:59 AM
I made a new "era correct" timing tab to bolt onto the timing cover.  I still need to add the markings.

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Posted by lewbud on Wednesday, November 11, 2020 9:40 PM

That's a detail most wouldn't have thought of.  Be easier to see if it was on a different surface.

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, November 12, 2020 9:50 AM

That's true, I should have shot it on a piece of white paper as I'm doing for other small parts now.  (Three of them will fit on my pinky fingernail.)  It will show up against the orange engine.  Whether it will be visible on the finished project remains to be seen...

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, November 12, 2020 2:25 PM
This will be the starter.  I have a real one on my bench to copy.  Machined from brass and aluminum.

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Posted by lewbud on Thursday, November 12, 2020 6:50 PM

I have a feeling a lot of the work you are doing won't be seen, but that's okay because you will know it's there.  A couple more questions.  Is the end of the starter where the solenoid is 3D printed?  Why the use of brass and aluminum on the starter?

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, November 12, 2020 7:57 PM

Some of it may be hidden, but I'd rather have that than leave something off or skimp on the detail and find out later it would have been visible.  And yes, I'll have the photos...

No 3D printing for this part, all "old school" fabication. I milled that piece from raw stock, and turned the front piece from alumnum rod.  Brass tubing measured out correctly for the body so I soldered those parts together and finished it on the lathe.  I like to work with metal for it's strength and often the material doesn't need paint.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, November 13, 2020 11:29 AM
The Solenoid.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, November 15, 2020 1:50 PM
The front starter bracket, more brass, formed from one piece.  I used solder to make the fillet as it is a stamped steel piece on the real engine.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, November 17, 2020 11:11 AM
I machined the mounting hardware from aluminum.  Also note the Philips heads in the starter case.  I'll make the electrical connectors later.  For now the starter is done.

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Posted by lewbud on Tuesday, November 17, 2020 8:43 PM

I can see how you built the starter bracket out of one piece of brass, were you able to do the same with the timing mark indicator?  Was wondering about the holes in the starter body, but didn't see the 1/12 Phillips head screws coming. 

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, November 18, 2020 9:27 AM
I made the timing tab out of sheet styrene. While I like brass, some parts are just easier to make with softer materials.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, November 19, 2020 10:56 AM
Oil filter machined from resin stock.  It will be a Delco PF1218.  (More parts off my real car…)

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Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, November 20, 2020 11:15 AM
Finished oil filter.  I milled out the mounting location of the block so the filter sits into it instead of flush on it.  Made a decal for the label.   I date my filters when I install them.  Taking a guess on this one…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, November 21, 2020 11:06 AM
I machined the breather can from aluminum.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, November 22, 2020 11:01 AM
The distributor will be an OEM GM item too; a recurved HEI unit from an L82, (like on my real car).
I designed the cap and coil in SolidWorks. 
The electrical connection plugs will be grown on it too, but I won't be using the ring that locks the plug boots in place, it's a pain in real life.
Knowing the inside would probably not grow as clean as needed to fit to the aluminum distributor base I grew a jig with it to hold the cap so it could be machined to fit.  Worked like a charm too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, November 23, 2020 10:05 AM
The distributor base was machined from aluminum.  The cap is a cast resin copy.

 

 

Distributor base and vacuum advance canister.

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 9:54 AM
Painted cap ready to install.
Hold down clamps made of nickle wire.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by lewbud on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 1:41 AM

The four L shaped pieces below the distributor assembly, are they holddowns for the distributor cap?

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 9:57 AM

lewbud

The four L shaped pieces below the distributor assembly, are they holddowns for the distributor cap?

 
Yes, as stated in the post they are the hold down clamps.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 10:38 AM
Assembled scratch-built HEI distributor.  I'll add the tach and power wires later, the plugs for them are already on it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by BrandonK on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 12:47 PM

I don't know if the world has enough popcorn for me to sit and watch all this. Super neat work and detail like always. Amazing stuff.

BK

On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

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Posted by lewbud on Thursday, November 26, 2020 9:42 AM

Scale-Master

 

 
lewbud

The four L shaped pieces below the distributor assembly, are they holddowns for the distributor cap?

 

 

 
Yes, as stated in the post they are the hold down clamps.
 

 

Forest for the trees kind of thing.  You've mentioned several times that you're using parts off your car, what car is it?

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, November 26, 2020 11:07 AM

Thanks guys!

I'm just using the engine in one of my cars as the reference for this engine, it's in a Camaro.  (I built it too.)

But I'm running a Holley, not Webers.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, November 26, 2020 11:08 AM
The distributor boots for the ignition wires; made from scratch.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, November 26, 2020 11:10 AM

YIKES!!!!! That is really super nice Big Smile (refering to the Camaro)

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, November 26, 2020 11:25 AM

Thanks!  It's a blast to drive.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by lewbud on Thursday, November 26, 2020 10:08 PM

Sweet ride!

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, November 28, 2020 10:22 AM
Thanks!
 
Plug boots for the wires.  Made using the same process as the for the distributor boots.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, November 29, 2020 11:34 AM
And I made spark plugs too; made of steel and resin.  Shown with a boot installed.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, November 30, 2020 10:51 AM
I added the sand-cast texture to the block.  Notice the freeze plugs and timing cover are not textured. 
It still needs another coat of paint, but not until the oil and water plugs are added.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, December 1, 2020 11:52 AM
Thermostat housing and fuel pump block off.  The kit part didn't match my intake manifold. 
I was able to thin out the kit's block off plate.   I machined the aluminum bolts on both parts.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, December 1, 2020 7:25 PM
I added the oil and water plugs before the last coat of orange.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by lewbud on Tuesday, December 1, 2020 9:58 PM

What did you make the spark plug boots out of?  How did you simulate the cast texture on the engine block?

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 11:33 AM

lewbud

What did you make the spark plug boots out of?  How did you simulate the cast texture on the engine block?

The boots are cast resin I dyed very dark gray.

I used talc for the texture.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 11:34 AM
The timing tab has been bolted to the engine.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Corpus Christi, Tx
Posted by mustang1989 on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 2:25 PM

Just saw this thread. This thing is off the charts. Will now be tuning in for more updates.

                   

 

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 9:45 PM

mustang1989

Just saw this thread. This thing is off the charts. Will now be tuning in for more updates.

 

Thanks!  I've been reading through your Maverick project too.  (Great work!)

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 9:45 PM
The heads got the same texture treatment as the block…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, December 3, 2020 10:16 AM
I finished the water pump after texturing it as well and making the aluminum mounting hardware and the plug for where the heater hose would go.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, December 3, 2020 5:46 PM
Distributor hold down clamp.  Also scratch-built.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, December 4, 2020 9:09 AM
The oil pan is done for now.  More machined aluminum parts too.  There's a litte grunge in the recesses.
It's starting to look like something…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, December 4, 2020 6:27 PM
I made the head bolts and acid treated them because they were too bright.  Added a little grunge too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, December 5, 2020 10:04 AM
The transaxle was lightly textured and new bolts and plugs were machined for it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, December 6, 2020 10:19 AM
The rear of the case was also done the same way and the bolts were acid treated.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, December 6, 2020 9:02 PM
Breather can holder and mount.   More aluminum.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, December 7, 2020 11:24 AM
More small machined aluminum hardware made and added to the (3D created) rear cover. 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, December 8, 2020 10:36 AM
Dry fitting the transaxle subassembly together…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, December 9, 2020 10:18 AM
Time to start texturing and coloring some of the suspension parts…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, December 10, 2020 9:58 AM
I turned my attention back to the interior and started fabricating the dash parts.  The bulkhead is all styrene; solid stock and sheet.
The dash/gauge panels were made from sheet styrene too.
A little more styrene was used for the steering column and its mount.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, December 11, 2020 10:06 AM
The tub and some of the other bulkheads and related parts finally received some paint.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, December 12, 2020 10:36 AM
I fabricated the front sway bar guides from brass and styrene and then after machining the bolts and washers I lost one of the guides.   I wasn't in the mood to make the same exact part again, so I machined a different style of new (beefier) guides and used the aluminum hardware on them.   (I did not find the missing part yet…)

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, December 13, 2020 10:56 AM
I permanently installed the rear bulkhead and engine mount cross-member and just had to test fit the block and trans…
Figured I'd do the rear sway bar while I was working on the front one too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by lewbud on Sunday, December 13, 2020 12:22 PM

I know you've modified the tub to take your suspension components but other than that, is it basically as it came from the kit or did you do a lot of work on it?

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, December 13, 2020 1:13 PM

There's a lot of work in it.  The kit builds up very toy-like in many areas.  I've had to reengineer it to make it buildable/paintable with the reconfigured and scratch-built parts.

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by lewbud on Sunday, December 13, 2020 11:46 PM

I figured that. I was looking at the front end with the lightening/stiffening holes vs. the rivets and figured that you had done a lot of reworking.  Having never seen the kit before, I just couldn't tell how much.

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, December 14, 2020 10:10 AM

Plus I converted it fron RHD to LHD.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, December 14, 2020 10:10 AM
I made the rear hanger brackets for the exhaust.
Since it's for the street I started making a crossflow muffler.  It would still be loud, but at least not straight-pipe loud.
Inlet and outlets are brass tubing.
But wait, there's more… I embossed the Dynomax logo too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, December 15, 2020 9:19 AM
This is the main muffler bracket/mount.  Hand formed sheet aluminum.
And with the mounting hardware…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, December 16, 2020 5:52 PM
I started working on the oil coolers, but decided to machine the sandwich block and a couple fittings first.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, December 21, 2020 2:37 PM
The kit oil coolers were reworked and had some details added including some machined aluminum items and custom decals.  They will be mostly hidden behind the radiator when done.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, December 23, 2020 9:51 AM
The markings have been added to the timing tab and the bolts for the harmonic balancer and lower pulley have added as well.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by lewbud on Thursday, December 24, 2020 12:20 AM

Going back a little ways, did you machine the thermostat housing/water neck out of aluminum or is a cast resin piece?  Same with the harmonic balancer, is it cast resin or did you machine it out of something?  I like the decal for the timing marks.

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, December 24, 2020 12:54 PM

Both the thermostat housing and harmonic balancer are reworked kit parts.

And thanks!

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by lewbud on Sunday, December 27, 2020 2:45 AM

I was wondering how much research goes into something like this?  I realize some things would be fairly easy like the engine, but where do you get the images to do something like rebuild the front of the monocoque tub? Does a simple Google search work or do you have a good sized library?

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

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Posted by mustang1989 on Sunday, December 27, 2020 6:12 AM

Sensational work on this one!!! Wow!! 

                   

 

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, December 27, 2020 11:53 AM

lewbud

I was wondering how much research goes into something like this?  I realize some things would be fairly easy like the engine, but where do you get the images to do something like rebuild the front of the monocoque tub? Does a simple Google search work or do you have a good sized library?

All of the above, plus when I build projects like this I get a lot of friends sharing photos that help.

And thanks Mustang!

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, December 28, 2020 4:05 PM
I made the first sections of the exhaust pipes, brass, styrene rod and pliable tubing.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2021
Posted by Brock on Tuesday, January 5, 2021 11:18 PM

Nothing short of fantastic attention to detail! May I ask what lathe & mill you are using?

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, January 6, 2021 11:31 AM

Thanks!  I'm using Sherline machines.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2021
Posted by Brock on Wednesday, January 6, 2021 4:56 PM

I actually figured you would say a watchmaker's lathe. Sherline makes fine equipment!

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, January 8, 2021 10:54 AM
I spent some CAD time this week designing the brake master cylinder.
The clutch master cylinder.
The clutch slave cylinder.
 
And the J-56 Corvette adjustable proportioning valve & bracket.
Full assembly.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, January 12, 2021 5:31 PM
For some reason the proportioning valve would not print/grow with the rest of the layout.  I tried to print it separately but the printer stopped reading all files, so I made one from scratch the old fashioned way while I try to figure out what the problem is.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Tuesday, January 12, 2021 7:00 PM

This continues to be a heck of a lot of fun to watch. Thanks and please keep going.

 

-Greg

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, January 13, 2021 11:42 AM

Thanks Greg!

 

These are the masters I pulled a mold off for the brake and clutch parts.  I broke the little bracket extricating it from the RTV, no problem; it will be more resilient as a cast part.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, January 14, 2021 10:26 AM
I got the printer working again and made the original proportioning valve I did in 3D.  (I guess it's like losing a part in the carpet; make a new one and you find the original…)

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, January 16, 2021 8:39 PM
The cap for the clutch master was made with the other parts, it grew well and even cast nicely, but it didn't look right.  So I milled a new one.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, January 22, 2021 1:49 PM
Finished clutch slave cylinder, installed.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, February 3, 2021 2:29 PM
The master cylinder assembly with J56 proportioning valve & bracket and cap w/gasket.  Working cap clamps too… (overkill?).  The bleeders and front line fitting will be added later. 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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