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Denning Landseer Coach, 16th scale, Using Sheet Acrylic for strength

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  • Member since
    March 2014
Denning Landseer Coach, 16th scale, Using Sheet Acrylic for strength
Posted by Graham Green on Tuesday, August 6, 2019 9:12 PM

Here's something that I attempted to make,  it appears "my ambition far exceed my ability ".

I wanted to make a Express Passenger Coach, a Denning Landseer Coach,  no way would the manufactures allow me access to there Coach drawings, so, I had to settle for a spare parts book for a lot of internal details,  along with heaps of measurements and lots of photos of a full sized Coach.

Drew it to 1/16th scale, starting as a full chassis, so I could add all the inner and outer body work as I went along.
Started the first chassis and it soon became apparent that the drawing I had done was wrong, so I found a Coach undergoing a refurb, to make it into a camper and more measurements and photo's were taken.

Re-drew what was wrong and then started on the second chassis, I was well into the second one and I found out who had the original drawings of these Coaches, when the manufacture went bankrupt, all the gear was sold at auction. The person who had the drawings let me have a look and it became very clear, that the second chassis was wrong as well, this was on that old MicroFiche stuff, could have got it converted to JPG’s easily. I could not get that person to allow me to get all the drawings converted to JPG's, so I admitted defeat and packed the whole lot away, maybe someday it will be resurrected, but not sure when this will happen.

I tried out experimenting with Acrylic, could get it cheap and it was easy to get it worked down to the sizes I required, it is about the same weight as Polystyrene but FAR stronger. I just cut the sheet Acrylic with a band-saw, to get it somewhere near the size,  so I could then sand it to the required thickness that I was after. I used a Thickness Sander to sand it to the exact size I required, then thru a bench saw, to get it to the exact size I needed.

If I needed a long length of 3mm by 2mm, easy as, didn't need to splash any cash for Evergreen either. Acrylic is much stronger than Styrene and you can glue it just as easy as Polystyrene, you do need the correct glue to do this though.

Using the correct glue for Acrylic even allowed me to add bit's of Styrene when required, it glued up to the Acrylic and stuck 'like $hit to a blanket', bit of a BONUS that one.

Somebody gave me an Aluminium front end and steering from the 1/16th kits, he used one from the kit to cast quite a few from Aluminium, I even made it steerable, very easy conversion that one.
The Detroit Diesel 6V92T was used in this chassis, the airbag suspension was cast resin,  I just had to make the master for the mould.  Added all the shock-absorbers as well, these could be adjusted up and down so ALL the wheels sat on the ground evenly .
I used a few bit’s from the 1/16th kit like the rear axle, only had to add some strengtheners to it so it looked correct.
Lot’s of photo’s to show what a bare chassis looks like on a Coach, enjoy, any questions —— please ask.

First photo is of the full sized vehicle I attempted to make -----

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: NEVER USE PHOTO BUCKET - IT'S A THREAD WRECKER.
Posted by disastermaster on Wednesday, August 7, 2019 12:42 AM

You're quite talented to say the least.

http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL351/12291693/21864322/413446218.jpg  http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/3/t/134935.aspx?page=11

  • Member since
    March 2014
Posted by Graham Green on Wednesday, August 7, 2019 1:19 AM

Thought I would try my hand at making a brake that actually works in 1/16th scale.

So back to the drawing board and came up with this set-up, made up backing plate, brake drum and brake shoes. The shoes can move outward towards the brake drum by the motion of the "S" cam, all you have to do is give the slack adjuster a pull with a fingertip and the S cam rotates, this spreads the brake shoes outward onto the brake drum. The two springs fitted to the brake shoes, allow the shoes to retract when the pressure is released.

This was going to be fitted to the Aluminium front axle on the Coach.

Most of the working bits are made from sheet Acrylic, that's the stuff that looks a bit foggy.

So if your thinking about making something, then draw it to scale to see if it can be done ----------

 

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, August 7, 2019 8:45 AM

I have used acrylic rod for tube frames of racing cars.  Either acrylic or styrene sure is a lot easier than soldering brass tubing like I used to do.  My main trouble with acrylic is bending it for curved areas.  I find it hard to get uniform curves without melting parts of the piece I am bending.

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March 2014
Posted by Graham Green on Wednesday, August 7, 2019 5:32 PM

Don Stauffer

I have used acrylic rod for tube frames of racing cars.  Either acrylic or styrene sure is a lot easier than soldering brass tubing like I used to do.  My main trouble with acrylic is bending it for curved areas.  I find it hard to get uniform curves without melting parts of the piece I am bending.

 

 

 

 


Acrylic ROD is not the same as Acrylic SHEET,  I am not a chemist so I can’t tell you what composition/properties make up each different type. But from working with both, sheet and rod, the ROD is a lot softer and I find it’s bloody hopeless for doing whatever I want to do with it.

 

Had quite a bit given to me, but in no time at all it hit the bin.



I can turn a bit of sheet Acrylic that I have cut roughly to size as easy as, but the moment I touch the Acrylic rod with the tool-tip, it just turns to $hit.

The rod is 'extruded', where-as the sheet is 'cast', so there must be a few different bits added to the rod, to allow it to be squeezed/flow/pushed out a small opening.



Now bending SHEET Acrylic is real easy, just add a bit of heat to where you want to bend it. A hair dryer is excellent for bending styrene, but it just aint got enough balls for Acrylic. So out comes its big brother.

https://www.milwaukeetool.com/Products/Power-Tools/Specialty-Tools/Heating-Tools/8988-20



Now you do NOT have to use it on HIGH, unless you want a puddle of Acrylic on the bench, just use the lowest setting and hold a bit of pressure on what you want to bend. As the Acrylic starts to soften, you’ll feel it start to give, so just keep carefully heating  and applying the pressure,  you’ll soon have it to the shape you want.

Too much heat is bad, just enough is all that’s needed.

By bending each individual bit seperate from any other bits, then when you have it bent to the desired shape, its only then added to the model, that way you will not ruin the piece alongside the bent bit.

Have you ever been to a Signmakers workshop and what they use for bending sheet Acrylic to make things like a Display case for a model. They heat and then bend the sheet all in the one place, well worth a visit just to see how the experts do it.

To turn Acrylic sheet into a rod you’ll need a lathe of some description. I just cut a bit of scrap sheet oversize, round one end of on the grinder, drill a small hole in the other end for a centre point, chuck it in the 3 jaw, bring the tailstock up to steady the other end with the live centre and turn it to the size I need.

OK, it takes a bit longer than grabbing a rod, but it works for me.

To get the Sheet Acrylic to an exact size, like a bit of 3mm X 2mm, I cut it a tad oversize, then shove it thru a Thickness Sander, in no time at all I have a length of what I want, exactly to the size required.

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, August 9, 2019 4:12 PM

Thought I would add this;

    I have bent Acrylic rod successfully using hot water ( Boiling ) .It softens it enough to let you put it in a jig Before it gets firm again. This with NO springback ! It's tricky though .Some I have had, actually turned into an oval mess . I guess you have to be sure where it's made .

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, August 9, 2019 4:14 PM

Graham;

      You are doing incredible work here. Question. Do you have a living Scale driver in the wings? Otherwise whose gonna push the pedal to engage those Beautimus brakes you've made?

       I did do a working hydraulic brake system in 1/8th scale but it took four tries to get it right .It did work through the master cylinder too. At the time I had a jewelers lathe.No Gotsa dat now !

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, August 12, 2019 11:39 AM

Again, that's awesome!!! And I know what you mean about trying to build something and the blueprints aren't right in the first place! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

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