SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

WIP BD-5 ready for paint.

6083 views
18 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    November 2009
WIP BD-5 ready for paint.
Posted by artworks2 on Thursday, December 4, 2014 9:44 AM
Some years ago there was a fuji model or some make like that. It was a small model to be sure. It had the Pepsi another kit had the Coors markings. I decided to resurrect that model in wood. Recently I read guys shelving models for one reason or another. I shelve them too. Over the holidays I found some time to revisit this one and will let you see how the paint graphic is applied. Stay tuned... Of course there are sizing disputes in all scales the silver bullet is 1/35th and the recent project 1/72nd  I would go smaller ,but the smallest is as comfortable on the joints as I want to carve. There is a fellow in Novescotia who makes palm size craziness...LOL
  • Member since
    April 2004
Posted by Jon_a_its on Thursday, December 4, 2014 10:07 AM

interesting....

East Mids Model Club 29th Annual Show 19th MAY 2019

 http://www.eastmidsmodelclub.co.uk/

Don't feed the CM!

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Thursday, December 4, 2014 12:06 PM

Firstly you have to make up some fine line tape. 3M doesn't seem to have the sizes for my need so using this old modelers trick is best. I use painters tape but burnishing the edges is always necessary if you wish to avoid bleed through. The cardstock template side view and wing to view become lay ups so I can transpose the graphic to the model in the exact place on each side of the model.

  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Thursday, December 4, 2014 12:08 PM
A ribbon of fineline tape begins this process.
  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Thursday, December 4, 2014 12:17 PM
I'll mask in the the canopy and paint scheme only to come back and remask the color stripes takes afew hours to do this process.Stay tuned..
  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, December 5, 2014 9:35 AM

Did you do any priming or other preparation of the wood surface before painting the canopy area?

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Friday, December 5, 2014 1:48 PM

Hello Don. I use a tack rag to dust off the model. The canopy is a very dark grey acrylic water base taped off then applied with airbrush. I'll use flat white to paint the over all.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, December 6, 2014 10:00 AM

So you do not fill the grain of the wood?

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Saturday, December 6, 2014 2:35 PM
Don not after a good 80 grit finish sanding :-). Acrylics have a filling property I suppose. The top coat on this is (miracle whip) AKA snow white Krylon. Once I get the graphic trans posed onto the model I can mount it on my lazy Suzan to rotate as I paint.very even finish. Back masking the graphic insures nice tidy lines.The templates can be used on six other models befor replacement.
  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Saturday, December 6, 2014 5:10 PM
Of course the bottom of the model gets it's treatment. It might be of interest that my work is made from junk wood as seen by the grain on the right.
  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: St louis
Posted by Raualduke on Saturday, December 6, 2014 11:56 PM

That is some very nice "junk" wood. What is it exactly?

  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Sunday, December 7, 2014 11:46 AM

Raualduke Yellow pine/White pine. Most of the wood this year came from construction piles.

  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: St louis
Posted by Raualduke on Sunday, December 7, 2014 12:11 PM

Thanks. Would have never guessed pine

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, December 8, 2014 8:55 AM

While I usually use basswood for smaller scratch projects, I have used pine for larger subjects like ship models.  Much cheaper than basswood and still works easily.  Only problem is it takes more filler to hide grain.  Basswood is so easy to carve and the grain is so tiny it is easy to fill, but the stuff is not that cheap.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Tuesday, December 9, 2014 2:01 PM

80 grit  is fine for smoothing out the grain with no need for filler. The majority of my clients who own my work like to see the grain. This model is a master for some up coming Dapron vacuum molding.

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Saturday, March 14, 2015 10:17 AM

That was a really unique and fun aircraft to watch.  I was really surprised at how small that thing was.  

We were at an airshow at Cleveland's Burke Lakefront Airport when it arrived in a C-47.  They brought it out through the cargo door and attached the wings, then asked us for permission to park it by us for protection.

i213.photobucket.com/.../scan0432-1.jpg

i213.photobucket.com/.../scan0433-1.jpg

i213.photobucket.com/.../scan0434-1.jpg

  • Member since
    August 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Friday, May 29, 2015 3:47 PM

I think you show an extreme ability to used found wood like I do plastics and other stuff . I like what you do .    T.B.

  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Saturday, September 26, 2015 8:19 PM

Great vintage photos looks like flagship #1 thanks for your intrest.

  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by artworks2 on Saturday, September 26, 2015 8:20 PM

T.B. Thanks for your kind words just a hobby that pays for itself.....

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.