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1/72 CLB-75 Resin Model Kit

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  • Member since
    December, 2013
1/72 CLB-75 Resin Model Kit
Posted by CodyJ on Friday, August 14, 2015 6:43 PM

I want it to be clear I am not advertising. 

Just wanted to show you a kit that I made.  It was designed on the computer in a CAD 3D program.  I then had it 3D printed and made the instructions.  Its in 1/72 scale and I am very happy with the result.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, August 16, 2015 10:50 AM

I take it that must be a British tank.  Never seen nor heard of it before!

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    December, 2013
Posted by CodyJ on Monday, August 17, 2015 2:43 AM

Its actually American.  It was made in hopes to sell to the American Army.  However the sale of it fell through after seeing the MKIV the British were using so effectivly.  Lost to time other than the half-dozen pictures that remain as proof to its existance.  

"The C. L. Best Tractor Company of San Leandro, California built two mock-up types on their CLB 75 tractor. One had a semi-cylindrical hull with a turret and the other was similar but the hull had flat surfaces. These two machines appeared at a Fourth of July celebration in San Francisco in 1917, in manoeuvres with units of the California National Guard."

From: AFV-G2 Magazine, Vol.5, Number 4 in 1975. By Baron Publishing

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, August 18, 2015 9:00 AM

I'm curious about something.  In order to cast in resin, you had to have a pattern.  I assume the 3D printing was to produce the pattern.  Why not stop there, and build the model from the 3D printed parts?  Or was the problem the tiny steps in the 3D printed object, which could be sanded to make a smoother cast object?

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    December, 2013
Posted by CodyJ on Thursday, August 20, 2015 1:36 AM

Good question Don.  The reason is, after a mold wears out then you need to recast the master again.  If you only cast a resin copy you lose detail that the first mold may have missed.  So in short, when a new mold is needed, the master from the 3D printer is the most accurate to start with.

That being said I will make one of the Resin cast ones here soon.  I would like to have a "Build" pic to accompany the rest.  

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Thursday, August 27, 2015 11:46 PM

Looks quite good !

Out of curiosity, do you know the effective printing resolution of the 3D printer that was used to print the CAD solid model?

 

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, August 21, 2016 9:27 PM

WOW !

 I just saw a program about a Sub that was built in the 1800s and actually worked .Now the model you have .Cut in half lengthwise and re-assembled and then cut horizontally with a square sided flat bottom could become the sub .

 A smaller turret assembly would work in place of what's there . I just recently saw her on another Program this July .The sub has drastically changed from the first program .There's less of her and certainly no going inside the collapsed structure .I am afraid she is doomed to oblivion .  T.B.

  • Member since
    October, 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Saturday, September 03, 2016 9:03 PM

I'm assuming you're not talking abouit the C.S.S. Hunley but the one they used after the Civil War to harvest oysters for pearls.  It's only a matter oy yards of the Panama shoreline and can be seen sticking ouit of the water.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, September 30, 2016 4:09 PM

Hmmm;

You are dead on correct !     T.B.

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Saturday, October 01, 2016 12:36 PM

There was a show on that one a few weeks ago where they did some exploratory work on her to find out more about her.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, May 04, 2017 9:13 AM

Ya Know , Goldhammer ;

 This just proves something we are all privy too . Much is lost in the"Sands of Time  ".

 Makes me wonder how much we have actually lost over the centuries . This also makes me question a lot about Archealogy . What did the folks actually use to build the Pyramids ?

 And a lot of other stuff . There are finally items being found concerning weapons of the Civil War .Why stop there ? The Germans in W. W. 2 had the makings of the Bomb . And a  "Flyable " Old style Saucer ( I refer the the Haunabau here ) So What else is out there we missed ?

   Can you dress a Granite stone so perfect that you don't need mortar? The Incas and Aztecs did . How ? Oops , Sorry I got carried away .  T.B.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, May 04, 2017 9:35 AM

I was under the impression that the pyramids were unmortared stones.  In fact, I think most pre-historic stone building did not use mortar.

On the other hand, many of the old unmortared stuff looks like there is no mortar.  The skill is making it fit so nicely you can't see through the joints, or in some cases even cannot see the joint!

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Thursday, May 04, 2017 10:47 AM

Hi,

That looks great.

Pat

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