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bismarck

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  • Member since
    January 2016
  • From: Fremont, California
bismarck
Posted by Kevin Ma on Tuesday, February 2, 2016 5:52 PM

How exactly do you scratch build?

For example, the revell bismarck kit, as I have done some research, is missing some details, which I may have to scratch build.............that r not included in PE sets.......

hwo do you scratch build?

like what materails?

Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN)

On bench:

Revell 1/350 Bismarck

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Tuesday, February 2, 2016 11:06 PM

Scratch building opens up a whole new area for you to experience, from just making simple things like antennas and support wires, to making a complete subject from nothing but scraps laying around, pieces of packaging material, and things you may find while you are out and about.  It just takes some imagination and knowing what it is you want to build.

Here's a few examples of what can be done:

The various lines and cables are a combination of thin wire and stretched sprue.

The armor and gunmounts, the seats and interior parts made to convert this V-100 into a Air Force M-706  base defense vehicle, are made form pieces of scrap plastic rod and sheet plastic.

The sunglasses on the figure of this Air Force Security Police figure from the VIetnam war are made from scrap pieces of plastic and the rifle sling is made from masking tape.

This little light attack craft started out life as a white out tape dispenser.  The wings and tanks are from a small scale aircraft kit, the canopy is from a P-38M night fighter and so on. Don't let these examples deter you, or frighten you away from learning how to scratch build.  Long ago I started to make by hand what I needed for a project.  We didn't have photoetch and resin parts back then so you had ot make what you wanted or do without.

It depends on what parts you will have to make.  You can use almost any material you come across.  In the case of a battleship, you can use thin plastic sheeting, plastic rods, stretched sprue, and more. Just what parts are you thinking of building for the madel?

You have to think about what you need and see what you have on hand or might be able to find somewhere.

If you find you need some pieces of thin plastic, I have a supply of the stuff left over form work.

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by modelcrazy on Tuesday, February 2, 2016 11:28 PM

Kevin,

Like Ikar said, you can use almost anything from sheet styrene, electrical wire, solder, aluminum from soda cans, even card board.

Here is an example of all five in my Musashi wreck.

 

Steve

 

Steve

Building a kit from your stash is like cutting a head off a Hydra, two more take it's place.

 

 

http://www.spamodeler.com/forum/

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 5:42 AM

Can you get that a bit lighter?

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by modelcrazy on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 7:26 AM

No. They were taken in low light for effect but these will give you the whole scene.

 

Steve

Steve

Building a kit from your stash is like cutting a head off a Hydra, two more take it's place.

 

 

http://www.spamodeler.com/forum/

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 9:11 AM

I use any materials that will do the job. If several materials will do the job I choose the cheapest.

Most of the hulls for my scratchbuilt ships are wood- basswood if they are small, aspen for larger ones.

I use wood, plastic or metal for upper works- even cardstock at times.  Sheet styrene is easy to come by at hobby shops.  Some hardware stores sell signs (garage sale, for sale, etc) printed on sheet styrene.  Generic PE sets of fittings (railings, ladders, etc.) are available if you stay in a popular shipmodeling scale.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January 2016
  • From: Fremont, California
Posted by Kevin Ma on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 6:06 PM

thank you all.

What should I use for the rigging?

thx

Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN)

On bench:

Revell 1/350 Bismarck

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by modelcrazy on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 7:06 PM

I use fly tying thread or very light fishing line. Sometimes stretched sprue or EZ Line.

Steve

Building a kit from your stash is like cutting a head off a Hydra, two more take it's place.

 

 

http://www.spamodeler.com/forum/

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 7:12 PM

Ditto.

EZ Line is great stuff, perfect for what you need here.

I love to go to Rite Aid or places like that and look for stuff.

I've made torpedoes out of ballpoint pens, shoulder armor from plastic measuring spoons. It's pretty fun.

Here's a stupid story.

Back in the day in Univ. we wrote our programs on a card keypunch machine. I was building an architectural model that needed a lot of perforated sunscreens, so I ran a batch of cards where every single "chad" was punced.Destroyed the machine, got 86'd permanently from the Computer Lab.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 9:23 PM

I've still got some old key punch cards from our F-106s before we got a computer to track our pilots.  I keep them in a zip lock bag for those rare occasions when I might need some retangular patterns.

  • Member since
    August 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Thursday, February 4, 2016 6:19 AM

Hey " G "

 Do you think that is why I was prohibited access to the same area on one of my jobs ? Gee , I only ran 24 .  T.B.

  • Member since
    August 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Thursday, February 4, 2016 6:24 AM

Hi ;

   A good for instance is gun barrels and rails . When the scale required it I used found items that looked right . I did car canopies for a futuristic car for Fisher Body Craftsmans Guild  , out of the first large bubbles that came with some of my sister's collectable dolls .

     I did get both , the Merit Badge offered by the Scouts , also that scholarship . Like I said a long time ago , the only male in my family from my generation to go to college .

    T.B.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, February 4, 2016 9:20 AM

Old IBM punch cards make excellent card stock for modeling. It has a plastic coating over it (to keep it from changing size with moisture) and primes and paints just like styrene, but is very thin.

I eventually ran out, and asked if anyone knew of a source (on the newsgroup rec.models.scale).  A guy replied that he would send me a whole box if I would just pay postage.  They were used, but depending on the program sometimes only half a dozen of the left side columns were punched.  I still have a reasonable amount left, but don't know what I will do when that runs out!

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2005
  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Thursday, February 4, 2016 12:18 PM

Don Stauffer

Old IBM punch cards make excellent card stock for modeling. It has a plastic coating over it (to keep it from changing size with moisture) and primes and paints just like styrene, but is very thin.

...............................but don't know what I will do when that runs out!

 

Instructors used to hand out a few in programming classes 20 years ago...................
Those handful I have serve as bookmarks;regretably I never received enough to build paper kits.
  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by modelcrazy on Thursday, February 4, 2016 1:09 PM
Those look like the same cards that went into the KW-7 which was decommissioned in 88.

Steve

Building a kit from your stash is like cutting a head off a Hydra, two more take it's place.

 

 

http://www.spamodeler.com/forum/

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, February 5, 2016 8:59 AM

GMorrison

That's pretty expensive- over 20 cents a card with shipping.  I'll pass.  Unpunched cards are better for modeling use, more of stock usable.  But at that price I'll use styrene!

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, February 5, 2016 9:11 AM

Oh for sure.

I tried using "for rent" signs, once.

There were a number of draw backs. First, the sign had a pebbly surface, or at least not "Evergreen smooth". Second, try as I might with primer, it was nearly impossible to make the red graphics dissappear.

And at $ 10 for a 9x12 sign, not cheap.

The capper was that when I brought them home and layed them out on paper to spray, my daughter freaked out.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

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