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Epoxy Putty

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  • Member since
    September, 2014
Epoxy Putty
Posted by rooster513 on Monday, September 12, 2016 7:43 AM

Hey all, I've experimented with using some epoxy putty for scratchbuilding as I've seen it done by some. I'm just looking for any tips on using this stuff b/c it's kind of a pain with how sticky it is. Seems to stick to everything as I'm trying to shape it. Using a little bit of water seems to help but it's still tough. Is there any secret?

Also what brand of putty do you guys use? I'm using JB Weld b/c that's what Walmart carries. Thanks in advance for any feedback!

-Andy

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, September 12, 2016 11:14 AM

I have used Milliput a couple of times.

It seems fairly simple to use and I don't recall any sticky messes.

-Greg

  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Monday, September 12, 2016 11:35 AM

Greg

I have used Milliput a couple of times.

It seems fairly simple to use and I don't recall any sticky messes.

 

Does it harden up well so you can sand and paint it without it crumpling? I used the epoxy putty to make a map case as I figured it would look more natural then styrene strips. I figured a gap filling putty would crumple if handled but I never tried it.

-Andy

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Monday, September 12, 2016 1:46 PM

I use Miliput white. I mainly use it for Zimmerite. Two tips i have. Fiorst, water. I have a small pot of water and mix it in that then brake off small bits and aply. But i have found if left in the water for to long, more than about half an hour, it does not work as well. So i just mix a small bit, which is fine for me as i just apply it to one secion at a time and then leave to dry. The second is latex gloves. I did find that trying to smooth it down with a bare fingur to get it thin, it d would grip to my fingur, probably the ridges on it. But with a glove on it smooths down nicley, and i have a clean fingur.

I also used it to make a tarp and it can out really well. And i have had no issues sanding, drilling or painting it. I have seen people use it to make limbs on figures and seen some amazing results, i would like to try that some day.

 ''I am a Norfolk man, and I glory in being so''

  

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/32nd Ju 87G-2

  • Member since
    May, 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Monday, September 12, 2016 1:50 PM

I'm a big fan of Milliput. I bought my first package of it on a trip to England in 1978, and I've been using it ever since - for all sorts of things, from making the "carvings" on a sailing ship model to repairing old plaster figurines.

I can offer a few tips.

1. It's available in several colors and textures. I don't think there's really much to choose between the textures; "standard," to me, works just about the same as "fine." The color doesn't matter much either - assuming you're going to paint the finished model. But the choice of color does make a difference in terms of how the finished paint looks. I used the terra cotta kind to make some parts for my Revell Viking ship, because it's just about the color of the plastic. If I'd used white or grey, I would have needed several more coats of paint (I brush paint models like that) to make it blend in with the surrounding areas.

2. When you mix the two parts together, make sure you really mix them. It takes five or ten minutes. If you see streaks of the two colors, you need to keep mixing. If you don't, the stuff may not dry right.

3. One of Milliput's big advantages (if you look at it that way) is that it takes a long time to dry. Usually two to three hours - though the time will vary depending on the thickness of the application. When it's just been mixed, it handles about like modeling clay. When it's almost but not quite hard, it works like hard wax. In that condition the only limit on its detailing ability is the modeler's skill.

4. The instructions tell you that it will be easier to smooth if you put a little water on it. That's true, but use the water sparingly. The only time I've had a problem with Milliput crumbling was when I had to repair the cast plaster details on an old, cheap picture frame some friends wanted restored. I mixed some water into the Milliput, thinking it would stick to the underlying plaster better that way. Mistake. As soon as it dried it started chipping and crumbling. Don't apply any water until the Milliput is shaped pretty much the way you want it. Then dampen youre finger and touch a little water to the surface.

5. One of Milliput's most remarkable characteristics is its ability to hold its shape when rolled out into thin sheets. I haven't tried it myself, but some 54mm figure modelers make flags out of Milliput.

6. I know of at least two mail order firms that sell it: Squadron and Micro-Mark. I've also bought it at, of all places, Hobby Lobby.

Hope that helps a bit. I highly recommend Milliput. Good luck.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Monday, September 12, 2016 1:55 PM

Sounds good Bish, I'll have to give it a try. I was able to use my finger to get thickness I liked but as you said the epoxy sticks and it left fingerprints. I'm happy with how the map case came out being it was my first try but would like something easier to work with and it sounds like Milliput is a good way to go. I'm attempting my first bit of scratch building in the cockpit of the Hurricane I'm working on and while it has been trying at times I'm enjoying itBig Smile

Thanks for the feedback!

-Andy

  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Monday, September 12, 2016 2:01 PM

Thanks for the detailed advice jtilley! I did notice even with the epoxy I was using that if I let it dry a bit it was easier to work with, I'll have to do the same with the Milliput. Now that you mention it, I think I've seen it at Hobby Lobby. Guess I'll have to make a trip there soon...oh darnWink

I really appreciate the feedback!

-Andy

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, September 12, 2016 8:14 PM

Andy,

Sounds like the professor and Gillig..... I mean, Bish, have more experience than I and the practical advice you need. (Sorry Bish, couldn't resist that)

I hope your experiences go well!

-Greg

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, September 16, 2016 1:37 PM

Oh Boy !

  You fellows are going to laugh . I use a putty that can be kneaded and formed while wet . I get it from a company that sells products for boat repairs .  T.B.

  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Friday, September 16, 2016 2:11 PM

What's the name of the product T.B?

-Andy

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