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Quality of Product - Paper Models

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  • Member since
    August, 2008
Quality of Product - Paper Models
Posted by tankerbuilder on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 1:41 PM

Hi, Everyone !

   This is is reply to someone who asked about the " Acidity " in the paper . I do understand this is a logical concern  .Now to allay your fears . I have some paper ships built , that are over forty years old .

   I did not , back then , spray them with craft clear as I do now .Ttheir condition ? Shall we say even with the age they have on them - excellent .

    Now when I do paper I am always hunting for ways to make them even better such as the use of P.E. for rails,ladders and mast details etc.

  I do use heavier paper - I/e - Business card stock if I am going to print my own .The ones still in their original packages , some stored in a non-environmentally controlled building are as fresh and white as they were when I got them .Every Page !

 I don't really know the paper types , but, it seems that the leaders such as Wilhemshaven , Schreiber and Model Polsky ,  Use high quality paper . Some seems to have a higher finish on it ( semi - gloss finish on the printed side ) and most do not . The only place I've seen a difference is in Wilhemshaven models . Due to the flat finish to their paper , you have less adjustment time to put a part or panel in place That's about I can add right now . Model On!    T.B.

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 2:28 PM

Possibly the only way I can be certain of the blank card and paper stock I purchase in a store would be to look for a manufacturer name and contact information for an inquiry.Hmm

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 2:29 PM

Hello!

If a book can last 300 years and longer (pages and the binding!) then why couldn't a paper model too? OK, it takes some knowledge to pull off something like this. You could put a model aside for a year or two to do your research and finish your previous model and if the unstarted model doesn't show signs of problems I'd say there's nothing seriously wrong with the paper and it can last. Another thing is the durability of the glue - currently I'm repairing an old 1:33 B-17G model from GPM ad it's the glue that starts to show signs of decay. I built that model like 20 years ago and I was experimenting with materials, the glue is some kind of soviet-made tube glue I bought from people who were trading stuff across the border.

Let me also say Model On! and wish you a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 5:26 PM

Hi , Pawel !

Fancy meeting you in a place like this . Hey I was just thinking .Could you obtain a list of models by the primary Polish paper model firm for me .You can get my address off line in the message area .   T.B.

The reason .Well , since the demise of PMI.Out of Oregon I can't find anywhere to buy them .

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 5:28 PM

Hey , Goose ;

   I think some of the sellers would know the acidity of their products in the store  .No harm to ask a manager for assistance ?

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Wednesday, September 17, 2014 7:14 AM

tankerbuilder

Hey , Goose ;

   I think some of the sellers would know the acidity of their products in the store  .No harm to ask a manager for assistance ?

Possibly.
Provided the manager is willing to devote time to the effort.
Worst case scenario, I copy manufacturer info off the package and check the manufacturer online for specs......provided the specs aren't in Mandarin.
  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, September 17, 2014 8:53 AM

The chemicals and the processes used in paper making constantly change.  I doubt many books printed today will last 300 years.  There are archival papers made today, but you have to search them out, not merely grab any stock at office product stores.  Some of the deluxe offerings from photo paper vendors do worry about longevity but you have to look into the offerings with that in mind, and the weights offered are not nearly as broad as for general business printing.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Wednesday, September 17, 2014 10:13 AM

Hi , Don ;

I have found ,if you look at the weight of the paper on the package it will say 20 lb.etc .That is an indicator of quality as well  . Like cotton, and the threads per inch there , paper has a content of wood product .The tighter the grain and possibly the less acid within . It could be the other way too .I don't really know .     T.B.

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Wednesday, September 17, 2014 2:49 PM

tankerbuilder - my posts in the paper models section should be no surprise - I started building them in 1986 or at latest 1987! Big Smile Here, let me post one of them:

Don - sure, you don't really know what you buy. So I say let's buy some stuff and put it aside and just see how it behaves over years - they pass faster and faster recently! - so that should be no problem.

Good luck with your projects and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Monday, September 22, 2014 3:03 PM

That is a funny ship Pawel ;

  It's all flat on top with some bumps .Oh , It's the Gambier Bay isn't it ? Great job my friend . How long did it take to build the planes and what magnifier setting did you use ?   L.O.L.- L.O.L !.      T.B.

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 4:09 PM

tankerbuilder - that ship is the USS Belleau Wood. Built out of late nineties' Maly Modelarz. I just cut out a few parts of it before finishing high school and then abandoned it to concentrate on the final exams. Then I studied five years and after I got a job I dug the model out and built it. It was lightly painted over the printed colours to improve the looks.

By the way, soaking the paper with lacquer greatly increases the durability of the model and was widely used in Poland before 1989, where we only have sh*tty paper on our hands, and that was also what Maly Modelarz was mostly printed on.

The planes were easy compared to the maze around the flight deck - took me two weekends at most Big Smile. Glad you like it, thanks for looking and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    May, 2006
Posted by Rob Beach on Thursday, September 25, 2014 2:09 PM

I would say the acidity of your materials would be of prime concern.  If you are printing patterns on the computer, then you also would need to research the inks you are using.  Since glues made for 'scrap booking' usually indicate whether they are archival or not, then paper is next - and much of that information is found from the manufacturers, where the pH values are a factor in production as well.  Many OEM inks (and papers) that indicate they are for 'photo printing' are a good bet for longevity.  And as Pawel indicated, clear coating materials such as a varnish, especially one cited as UV-resistant, could be useful in extending the life of the constructed model.  I suppose storage in a nitrogen-only atmosphere would also be effective... *8^O

Regards,

Robert

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, September 26, 2014 9:09 AM

I just noticed something yesterday. I was reading one of my older books, but copyright was in 1969, so date of printing was probably even more recent.  The paper throughout the book was turning yellow, was getting a bit brittle.  That paper sure will not last 300 years!

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    May, 2006
Posted by Rob Beach on Tuesday, October 07, 2014 11:34 AM

Yep!  Unless you're able to have a sealed, controlled environment storage space with no UV exposure (such as from fluorescent lighting)... but coated papers have a much better chance of lasting longer. 1969?  Only near 50 years now... ;^P

R/

Robert

  • Member since
    October, 2014
Posted by OneThousandArms on Friday, October 24, 2014 2:27 PM

Epson offers some archival papers, which might be of use.  Please be aware of the large selection of paper types and thicknesses available, as well as backlit transparency, adhesive and metallic "papers".  www.epson.com/.../all-epson-professional-imaging-media.do

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 11:25 AM

Now OTA :

      Here's one for you .I bought some of that Epson " Metalized Paper " . Great for model airliners !

  • Member since
    May, 2006
Posted by Rob Beach on Thursday, June 18, 2015 6:27 PM

Any printed kit from a hard-copy publisher should be of low acid paper if for no other reason than it provides for more consistent ink 'behavior'.

R/ Robert

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