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mast nomenclature- 20th century warships

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  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
mast nomenclature- 20th century warships
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 4:47 PM

How are the masts named on modern warships?  I'm talking about masts which no longer have sails, though they may have yards.  Does it depend on the relative heights of the masts, as in a sail ketch, or only on position along the ship?

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 5:46 PM

While we wait for an intelligent response, I remembered that there's a term called "mack" for a combined mast and you-know-what. Apparently these things aren't so much in favor any more.

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 5:51 PM

I think that most WWII ships with two masts, ie. BB's, CA's, CL's, were referred to as mainmast and foremast.  Anything more technical is past my limits on navel parlance.  Either Bill or Capt'n Mac will probaly chime in soon.

 

Yep, all flat antennas for Aegis and sat coms now.

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by CG Bob on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 9:05 PM

When I served aboard the Columbia River Lightship (WLV 604), the main or forward mast had the main and backup  beacons.  The after mast had the radar antenna.

ON the USCG 378' WHEC model I'm working on, they are commonly called the forward or aft masts. 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 8:58 AM

CG Bob

When I served aboard the Columbia River Lightship (WLV 604), the main or forward mast had the main and backup  beacons.  The after mast had the radar antenna.

ON the USCG 378' WHEC model I'm working on, they are commonly called the forward or aft masts. 

 

Ah!  That is a nice way to avoid any problems.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by Surface_Line on Thursday, April 20, 2017 12:16 AM

My first ship was USS Jouett (CG-29), a ship with two macks, just as G described above.  When I first went aboard I tried to demonstrate my in-depth technical knowledge of all things nautical, and I referred to the "forward" and "main" mack.  I was brought up quickly with the information that these were properly referred to as the "forward" and "after" macks.

After the rest of my 25 years of service, I have no question about naming the forward and after mack.

Rick

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Thursday, April 20, 2017 6:05 AM

Given that I was a career submariner, we referred to our masts by their function, i.e., #1 and #2 periscope, ECM mast, etc. These were seperate from the antennae. ToastToast

Bill

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, April 20, 2017 8:58 AM

To me the forward and aft masts make more sense than foremast and mainmast, since on the monitor I am building, the aft mast (mainmast) is lower and much smaller than the forward one.  Both of them are really full of antennas- big dipole arrays.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Thursday, April 20, 2017 9:52 PM

What I remember , going all the way back to NS 101, the convention was forward most mast was the "foremast" and the after, the main or mizzen mast.  But, sometimes, it was the after mast.

Some of which is modified based on the "mass" of the mast, too.

The forward mast, which is the larger mast, on USS Texas is identified as the foremast.  The after mast is identified as the mainmast, despite a lesser stature.  In Texas' case, that may harken back to her beginnings when she had two identical cage masts.

Macks originally came about as a way to reduce top hamper (and thus preserve metacentric height) by reducing the number of things poking up way above the CG (radars, antennae, TACAN, IFF gear, etc., all have significant wind resistence, too).

Later, since macks are skinned, they became part of hte "stealth" signature of the ship (even as the length of needed exhaust runs decreased (gas turbines do not need long exhaust trunks to run; and they generate little soot to be directed overboard.

If I remember right, 4 & 5 masted barks and barquentines are Fore, Main, Mizzen, Four,  (Five).  Staysail schooners often just numbered the masts, from fore to aft.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, April 21, 2017 9:59 AM

This ship has been moored across from my office for the last few days.

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, April 23, 2017 2:43 AM

Since it's a commercial vessel that's eitehr the foremast or mainmast--the civies don't much use "mack"--even if when built that way.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, April 23, 2017 10:17 AM

USCG

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Sunday, April 23, 2017 10:21 AM

Thought she might be a cutter, what with the helo pad on the stern.

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by Surface_Line on Sunday, April 23, 2017 3:25 PM

That is one of the Coast Guard's big icebreakers.  It is USCGC Polar Star.

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