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CL-145 U.S.S. Roanoke

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  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
CL-145 U.S.S. Roanoke
Posted by BigJim on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 3:59 PM

This model is on display in Roanoke, Va. at the Virginia Museum of Transportation. It is a very handsome ship! I would like to have a good size model of it, but, since there were only two in the Worcester class, I guess it will never happen in my lifetime.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 9:18 PM

Hi,

That's a nice looking model.  I've always liked how navies will sometimes use names of various cities, towns, states or regions for their ships, as it gives those places a connection with the people at sea even if the actual town or city etc is 100s of miles from the oceans Smile

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 9:49 PM

At least back in the day the name of the ship often was related to the hometown of a benefactor. So there were some somewhat obscure ones such as the USS Astoria CA-34, as in Astoria Oregon. Named for the John Jacob Astor expedition which founded the City to establish fur trading on the Columbia river. She was sponsored by a Mrs. McKay, a descendant of a partner in the Pacific Fur Company.

Roanoke was to have a sister ship USS Vallejo, which was not built. That name was eventually given to SSBN 658 USS Mariano Vallejo, built at Mare Island, CA. One of the few USN ships named for the citizen of a foreign country.

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by Surface_Line on Thursday, June 14, 2018 1:46 AM

Obscure, yes, but not without models.

In 1/700 scale, both Niko Models and Admiralty Modelworks produce very nice kits of the class.   In 1/700 The model is just about 12 inches long.

The Admiralty kit has more detail and more options for different time periods, and is a bit more expensive.

Rick

  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
Posted by BigJim on Thursday, June 14, 2018 8:29 AM

1/700 is just way too small for my old eyes! Especially at those prices!!!

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, June 14, 2018 12:21 PM

She is a very pretty ship.

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Thursday, June 14, 2018 2:05 PM

Have faith, another class of two, with the third cancelled (late war US battle cruisers, Alaska and Guam) has been released.  So there is hope, especially if enough requests are made.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Thursday, June 14, 2018 3:24 PM

GMorrison

At least back in the day the name of the ship often was related to the hometown of a benefactor. So there were some somewhat obscure ones such as the USS Astoria CA-34, as in Astoria Oregon. Named for the John Jacob Astor expedition which founded the City to establish fur trading on the Columbia river. She was sponsored by a Mrs. McKay, a descendant of a partner in the Pacific Fur Company.

Roanoke was to have a sister ship USS Vallejo, which was not built. That name was eventually given to SSBN 658 USS Mariano Vallejo, built at Mare Island, CA. One of the few USN ships named for the citizen of a foreign country.

Hi,

Hopefully not getting too far off topic, but I guess the USS Harold E. Holt, USS Conte De Grasse, USS Lafayette and the USS Winston Churchill are a couple other ships named for foreigners and the USS Canberra is a ship named for a foreign city (or at least a previous HMAS Ship named for a foreign city).

Pat

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Thursday, June 14, 2018 3:32 PM
Wow,never saw that one,puts me in mind of the Japanese heavies with the three turrets forward.

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Thursday, June 14, 2018 5:41 PM

I knew we had some triple forwards, can't remember if 5 or 6 inchers, mostly used as AA support for carrier task groups/forces.

  • Member since
    April, 2005
Posted by ddp59 on Thursday, June 14, 2018 6:37 PM

Brooklyn class light cruisers, 5 turrets, 3 forward & 2 aft each with 3x6" guns.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, June 14, 2018 10:54 PM

PFJN

 

 
GMorrison

At least back in the day the name of the ship often was related to the hometown of a benefactor. So there were some somewhat obscure ones such as the USS Astoria CA-34, as in Astoria Oregon. Named for the John Jacob Astor expedition which founded the City to establish fur trading on the Columbia river. She was sponsored by a Mrs. McKay, a descendant of a partner in the Pacific Fur Company.

Roanoke was to have a sister ship USS Vallejo, which was not built. That name was eventually given to SSBN 658 USS Mariano Vallejo, built at Mare Island, CA. One of the few USN ships named for the citizen of a foreign country.

 

 

Hi,

Hopefully not getting too far off topic, but I guess the USS Harold E. Holt, USS Conte De Grasse, USS Lafayette and the USS Winston Churchill are a couple other ships named for foreigners and the USS Canberra is a ship named for a foreign city (or at least a previous HMAS Ship named for a foreign city).

Pat

 

Yes! Except Winston had dual american/ british citizenship. There's also the USS Simon Bolivar.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, June 15, 2018 9:02 AM

If you want a big ship model, consider scratchbuilding one in wood.  The cost is very reasonable. If you use the bread and butter method of construction, and keep the layers reasonably thin, the carving is minimal except at bow and stern.

Ship modeling was the original form of model building.  Big tradition of ship modeling.  There used to be many sources of scale drawings available.  Less so today.  The wide availability of great model kits has hurt the market and plans/drawing vendors are disappearing, but for a US warship I am sure there are sources.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, June 15, 2018 9:10 AM

Don is right on there. Pick a scale that has all of the bits and pieces you need available. These days with 3D on demand online, just about anything is possible. But other common scales in either metric (1:100) say, or English (1/96 or 1/8" = 1'-0") will provide railings, ladders and all of that kind of thing.

Back to 3D, if you can get together the file, anything pretty much can be found There are more and more stories regarding special requests being fullfilled.

Someone here (EJHammer) needed Bofors guns in some screwy Lindberg scale around 1/500.

Found them in another scale, ordered a re-scaled set and voila!

I used "obscure" to refer to the USS Astoria. Of course there's nothing obscure about that ship. She fought and died heroically. I meant the name. I apologize for that.

  • Member since
    April, 2005
Posted by ddp59 on Friday, June 15, 2018 9:20 AM

quad bofers http://www.3dmodelparts.com/1-500-quadruple-40-mm-bofors-autocannons-with-shields-8-pcs/

could use a Baltimore class hull, 5" & light aa guns plus maybe most of the superstructures to use on the Roanoke.

Roanoke Dimensions, 679' 6" (oa) x 70' 8" x 25' (Max)

Baltimore  Dimensions, 673' 5" (oa) x 70' 10" x 26' 10" (Max)

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, June 16, 2018 6:44 PM

Really, Roanoke is a follow-on to the Atlanta-class CL(AA) cruisers, so you could use one to kit-bash.a 1/350 copy.

There are (IIRC) fiberglass hulls for the CL(AA)s in 1/8" (1/96) and 1/16" (1/192) scales; for which there are a ton of aftermarket/scractchbuild supplies.

Now, a 1/16"=1'-0" model will be about 42" lonng, too.

I had started a waterline 1/16" USS San Diego years ago, but the hull did not survive a move, so the project was sheled.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, June 16, 2018 7:08 PM

I wonder if an AA cruiser or two might have been useful to the RN in the Falklands, particularly at the landings.

Certainly Atlantic Conveyor and Sheffield were done in by longer range missiles, but Tristam and Galahad were hit with iron bombs.

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, June 16, 2018 7:18 PM

Ship naming has as many exceptions as it has rules of its history.

The term "capital ships" comes for vessels of a size and rarity to be named after national or State Capitals.

The US pattern, for the first half of the 20th century at least, was rather elegant.

Battleships, the heaiest of the heavy, were named for States, so that allowed for 45-48 at a time.
Heavy Cruisers were named for large cities, often State Capital cities, or for cities of historical significance--Lexington, Saratoga, etc.  This allowed for 60-75 ships.
Light Cruisers were named after notable cities, so this allowed for about 100.
Destroyers, once the world got around to naming them, were named for significant Naval figures, CNOs being much featured.  This allowed for 300-400 ships.
Submarines, once they were named, were named after fish.  Which allowed for untold numbers of boats.

Aircraft carriers and Amphibious warefare ships picked up a pattern of being named for notable battles.

 

Now, all that is pretty much chunked out the window in 1947.  Heavily spurred on by the fact that the USN commissioned over 50 aircraft carriers during the war, and followed no convention at all in naming them (to this day, arguments rage over whether USS Franklin was named for Benjamin, the Battle of (in Tennesse), or the city in Massachusetts).

The rise of the nuclear submarine further muddied the waters.  The boomers (blasitic missle boats) were orginially named after war leaders.  Which would have allowed for more than a few such boats.

For a very brief while, there was some sanity.  SSNs were named after cities; SSBNs and CGNs were named after States; Amphibs (generally) named for famous island campaigns or for previously famous naval vessels.  Even that was more exception than rule--last 4 CGNs were Virginia, California, Texas, and Truxton (a former CNO of some note).

After the debacle with USS City of Corpus Cristi (religious leaders required the "City of"), SSNs went back to fish.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, June 16, 2018 8:04 PM

One CV was named after an entirely fictitious place.

And a class of Ship named

after cabinet secretaries .

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, June 17, 2018 4:03 PM

Yep, Shangri-La--postwar naming.

Cabinet Secretaries have gotten short shrift overall, excepting with USCG, which has never had to comport with USN guidelines.

(Although the Coasties have opted for maritime features and virtues

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, June 17, 2018 11:32 PM

The USCG are real sailors all. Ditto USN but the coasties  have a lot of boats to name.

One of the ones I follow are the tree series bouy tenders

I’m working on the Fir.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Monday, June 18, 2018 9:24 AM

Hi,

I thought that the USS Shangri-La was launched in 1944.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Shangri-La_(CV-38)

 

  • Member since
    April, 2005
Posted by ddp59 on Monday, June 18, 2018 6:15 PM

it was.

CV-38 was named Shangri-La after a fictitious Hymalayan kingdom described by James Hilton in his novel, Lost Horizon. During World War II, just after the Halsey-Doolittle bomber raid on Tokyo of 18 April 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in response to questions posed by members of the press, reported that the planes had been launched from somewhere in Shangri-La. This name honors USS Hornet (CV-8) which actually launched the Tokyo raiders, and which was subsequently lost in the Battle of Santa Cruz Island on the night of 26 and 27 October 1942.

"PORTSMOUTH, Va., Feb.18[, 1944]--USS SHANGRI LA SET FOR LAUNCHING

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/023864.jpg

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/38.htm

  • Member since
    April, 2005
Posted by ddp59 on Monday, June 18, 2018 6:27 PM

CapnMac, less work to use a Baltimore class hull then to use an Atlanta class hull as the Atlanta hull is the wrong shape & size plus no useful parts from the Atlanta kit compared to what you can use off the Baltimore kit. also Atlanta has 2 props compared to Baltimore's & Roanoke's 4 props.

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