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Lindberg - - Air ForceRescue Boat vs. Owens Cruiser

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  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Lindberg - - Air ForceRescue Boat vs. Owens Cruiser
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, April 16, 2017 12:46 PM

Hi ;

     I am sure not many will read this . I am going to do this anyway , just to get it off my chest . I am sure many of you who build ships and boats might , though . Now we have two very venerable OLD kits here .the Air Force Rescue Boat has been around since the late fifties .The Owens is about the same age .

    Now , for the part that makes many AVOID Lindberg . Poor moldings , lots of flash and not really a scale model , per se . Why ? Well , the Owens is molded wrong . A real boat guy can see right away , that someone goofed .

    The Owens and it's partner who is not going to be mentioned again ( The Coronado ) don't have rounded bottoms ! They have squared off spray and rub rails .Not these kits .They are almost as round as a standard round bilge boat .

 They are intended to ( the real boats .) to get up on plane quickly and handle smartly .

 That's why in building them , they have shallow " V " bottoms and hard chines ( the edge of the hulll where it meets the sides ) . This allows them to rise out of the water for reduced drag .

  Now the Rescue Boat . A well molded multi - piece hull , like many Airfix boats . Good smooth moldings with little flash . Joining surfaces tight and smooth . Plastic quality top notch . AND everything fits pretty great ! .

 The Owens required four coats of Sprue-Glue and two of filler just to get to primer ! The Rescue boat ? Can you say tape , glue and eight hours and a smooth hull fitting tight at all joins ?   The point is . You have two vessels Both of dubious scale , But the A.F.R.B. builds cleaner and that's right off the bat !

    The Owens seems to be , Like the Coronado to be orphan molds . Not well engineered and of dubious quality as to proportion and size . I have the Russian version of the  inland water , transfer tanker and another from Imai of a Coast Guard 40' cutter . Scale 1/32 .  Proportions great .The Shell Welder is showing it's dubious past but building up clean in most areas .

     Now my question is this . We all know different companies swap molds and stuff quite often . Has someone not thought that with the Owens and the other that they would drive customers away ? I guarantee , you'll not build it if you don't have a couple of years building difficult kits under your belt .This little boat is NOT for beginners .The A.F.R.B.?  I would recommend it to anyone that has already built multi - piece hulls .

 I would be interested in hearing from those of you who have , or are in the build process on this boat . I can help if you're hung up or if you just want to talk about it and it's other sibling .The A.F.R.B. speaks for itself .  T.B.

  • Member since
    September, 2010
Posted by modelnut on Sunday, April 16, 2017 2:05 PM

I heard from someone writing a review of Lindberg's Owens boat. He was not impressed. Said it was certainly not worth the $25 msrp.

I'm looking for a 1:24 or 1:25 scale boat for a diorama like this: 

- Leelan

 

P.S. The artist is Simon Stalenhag : https://www.pinterest.com/pin/AYwK65rb0DUyyQyA9BhHtOOwp05D-UK9IvNznzwllrzY48z4dLspWn8/

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, April 16, 2017 7:17 PM

Sorry TB I don't know the answer to that one. I've got an Italeri MAS 1/35 boat kit that looks really correct in the box.

modelnut that's a good one. There are so many old golden oldie speedboat models made by the likes of Billings or Midwest, Sterling, ITO, Ideal and Arisrocraft.

Take a look at the Gasoline Alley Antiques site.

Its fun!

  • Member since
    March, 2006
  • From: Bangor, Maine
Posted by alross2 on Sunday, April 16, 2017 7:24 PM

The Lindberg AFRB is about 2.5" too short.  That's about 15 scale feet.

Al Ross

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, April 16, 2017 8:25 PM

Maybe it's really HO scale (1/87).

 

  • Member since
    March, 2006
  • From: Bangor, Maine
Posted by alross2 on Monday, April 17, 2017 6:11 PM

Based on dimensions in Friedman's US Small Combatants, the kit's hull length works out to about 1/91 scale, while the beam is approximately 1/85 scale.  It's advertised as 1/72 scale.  Tongue Tied

Al Ross

 

  • Member since
    March, 2006
  • From: Bangor, Maine
Posted by alross2 on Monday, April 17, 2017 9:30 PM

One of the actual boats

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 12:01 AM

Probably a reason for another thread so as not to hijack tank's.

But I'm shameless so here goes.

What do you all consider the best way to set a scale to a ship model?

From given dimensions. Or drawings.

For multi masted sailing ships, I often use the dimension between masts at deck level, compared to a drawing of same. Math is simple.

For stated dimensions I like the beam as it's usually pretty consistent and not hard to measure. Problem there is that it's a relatively small component of the overall dimensions, which compounds errors.

What do you molded depth doctors, masters of the laden waterline, professors of the Plimsoll, do?

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 9:47 AM

GMorrison

Probably a reason for another thread so as not to hijack tank's.

But I'm shameless so here goes.

What do you all consider the best way to set a scale to a ship model?

From given dimensions. Or drawings.

For multi masted sailing ships, I often use the dimension between masts at deck level, compared to a drawing of same. Math is simple.

For stated dimensions I like the beam as it's usually pretty consistent and not hard to measure. Problem there is that it's a relatively small component of the overall dimensions, which compounds errors.

What do you molded depth doctors, masters of the laden waterline, professors of the Plimsoll, do?

 

 

Yeah, maybe you ought to start a new thread.  Good topic!

At least ship modelers are lucky, ship drawings are relatively easy to come by compared to autos and some other genre. It is getting a bit harder, though. A few of the big plans collections are now gone, but on the upside, there are several nice new archives of scale drawings available free online :-)  Noticing more and more airplane drawings online too, but not organized in archives like ship drawings.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 10:12 AM

Hi,

Like GMorrison indicated, I usually try and find something that appears relatively fixed to do dimensioning off of.  For cars/trucks etc I usually try and use whellbase, since its reasonably easy to locate the center of the wheels.  For airplanes I often use wingspan, because length is sometimes harder to assess, especially if the plane has a nose probe, a tail that extends beyond the fuselage body (and/or fas lights sticking off the back end), or if the plane was a tail dragger (whereits not also clear if the "length" listed is planform length or the linear distance that someone measured from nose to tail while the plane was parked.

Ships can be harder though in that a) even sister ships can have a bit of variation, b) many official dimensions listed tend to be molded dimensions which typically don't include the plating or shell of the ship, c) for length or beam overall its never fully clear if you should only include the ship itself, or whether that should include bulwarks, jackstaffs, railing, rub rails or the like.  Additionally, things like waterline length can be tricky because a "design" waterline may end up being a fair bit different from the ship's actual operational waterline.

For the most part, for ships I will try and see if I can find any official drawings and try and match up any dimensions that they may show.  For larger ships this is often either hull depth, or the height of some upper deck, though here there still is the issue that such dimensions are typical molded dimensions "above baseline" and as such don't typically include keel thickness or deck thickness.

Pat

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 12:12 PM

Hey Leelan ;

 I do like the picture with a very old Pelagic fish .You could use Revell's Ski Boat or AMT's little jewel . That would be a dangerous catch indeed . T.B.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 12:16 PM

" G "

 I usually do this . I measure the model .Then I go to my Builders tables . They tell me what length a ship should be at both the waterline and length Over all .

 I used to build real boats  that had unusually broad beams to length .This was for comfort while under sail AND they could be one-handed easily Like a Friendship Sloop . T.B.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 12:17 PM

Hey AL ;

 Does Bluejacket have a model of one of those ?  T.B.

  • Member since
    March, 2006
  • From: Bangor, Maine
Posted by alross2 on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 1:16 PM

Tanker - Builder

Hey AL ;

 Does Bluejacket have a model of one of those ?  T.B.

 

Nope.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, April 20, 2017 2:38 PM

Al;

 I think you best get busy then . Gotta have one , LOL,LOL, . T.B.

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