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Trumpeter USS North Carolina 1/350

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  • Member since
    August, 2017
Trumpeter USS North Carolina 1/350
Posted by laskdjn on Thursday, May 24, 2018 4:48 PM

My brother asked me to build one for him.  I just got through the hull, that was a bear.  What tips and lessons learned can y'all give me on the rest of the construction?  I had planned on going mostly OOB with the exception of Tom's Modelworks PE set.

  • Member since
    March, 2012
Posted by madhatter on Thursday, May 24, 2018 9:05 PM

i would check on wood decking, it changes everything. ive always built 1/700 scale and am now gathering parts for my firdt 1/350. i tried PE on my small ships...it was a disaster! i had PE stuck to my fingers, lost in the carpet, you name it! just to small for me. BUT i think i can handle 1/350, good luck to you, and check out the wood decks.

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Friday, May 25, 2018 8:13 AM

madhatter

i would check on wood decking, it changes everything. ive always built 1/700 scale and am now gathering parts for my firdt 1/350. i tried PE on my small ships...it was a disaster! i had PE stuck to my fingers, lost in the carpet, you name it! just to small for me. BUT i think i can handle 1/350, good luck to you, and check out the wood decks.

 

How does that wood decking work?  Does it replace the plastic deck pieces or does it just go on top? 

 

Also, the instructions that come with the Tom's Modelworks PE are atrocious. I swear to God, half of the placement direction is, "check references for location"

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, May 25, 2018 8:21 AM

Personally ;

   The North Carolina by Trumpeter was my first of their kits .

  Rather than argue the accuracy of the kit with someone who didn't have one , I went to the source . Yes , the Ship Museum itself . They stated the following . "If it wasn't accurate as the ship floats RIGHT NOW , we would NOT carry it in the gift shop ! ".

 Now , I will admit , being a shipmodeler from Noah's time saved my butt ! Partway through the early part of the build they have you put on part of the upperworks plus the deck . Then turn it over and install the completed ship bottom of your choice . Kinda backwards that was  ! 

 The kit gave no more confusing instruction that I could find , Eduard P.E. and Done . She has a place of honor in a friend's home ! 

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Friday, May 25, 2018 8:21 AM

Wood decking fits over the deck. It comes in two different forms. One has a sticky side that adheres to the deck; the other has to be glued in place.

One problem that I have experienced with this decking is that the decks can "bubble" in any kind of humidity.  For that reason, I strongly recommend that you glue the deck in place, being sure to spread the glue evenly and thoroughly, and make sure to apply pressure until the glue dries.

Bill Morrison

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Friday, May 25, 2018 9:01 AM

Tanker - Builder

Personally ;

   The North Carolina by Trumpeter was my first of their kits .

  Rather than argue the accuracy of the kit with someone who didn't have one , I went to the source . Yes , the Ship Museum itself . They stated the following . "If it wasn't accurate as the ship floats RIGHT NOW , we would NOT carry it in the gift shop ! ".

 Now , I will admit , being a shipmodeler from Noah's time saved my butt ! Partway through the early part of the build they have you put on part of the upperworks plus the deck . Then turn it over and install the completed ship bottom of your choice . Kinda backwards that was  ! 

 The kit gave no more confusing instruction that I could find , Eduard P.E. and Done . She has a place of honor in a friend's home ! 

 

 

That's good information.  Normally, I build planes and tanks, this is my first ship.  I'm trying to compartmentalize the build into functional areas, like I do on airplanes and tanks and figure out what can be painted separately.  I figured I could build most of the first deck/lower hull, minus the fine details, paint all of that, then add the rest of the super structure.  I already mated the upper hull to the lower hull, so I've already kinda deviated from their instructions.

Would you say the Eduard PE set is vastly superior to the Tom's Modelworks PE set?  Like I said, the instructions that came with the latter leave much to be desired.

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Friday, May 25, 2018 9:03 AM

warshipguy

Wood decking fits over the deck. It comes in two different forms. One has a sticky side that adheres to the deck; the other has to be glued in place.

One problem that I have experienced with this decking is that the decks can "bubble" in any kind of humidity.  For that reason, I strongly recommend that you glue the deck in place, being sure to spread the glue evenly and thoroughly, and make sure to apply pressure until the glue dries.

Bill Morrison

 

 

Ok, so, basically, I'd sand off the current decking detail to put down the aftermarket wood decking.  Seems like kind of a waste if I'm going to paint it all deck blue anyway.

  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Posted by 1943Mike on Friday, May 25, 2018 10:57 AM

I'm not a very good model builder but I enjoy the process (when I'm not cursing, taking God's name in vain, on my hands and knees trying to rend a PE part from the carpet monster, etc.). That having been said, I didn't sand off the plastic deck detail on my HMS Dreadnought or USS San Francisco when I put on wood decks. Fortunately the decks didn't compromise the builds by raising the deck height too much. As least I don't remember their having done so.

If you believe that the thickness of the aftermarket wood deck will make the build more difficult by adding its thickness, then by all means sand away. I just didn't find that to be a problem in my "hack" builds where I've used wood decks.

Forgive the photos of the Dreadnought. Just found them in an external HD - thought they were lost after the Photobucket debacle. I'm sure you will see many mistakes but I didn't think the placement of the wood deck over the existing detail made any negative difference.

 

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Friday, May 25, 2018 11:43 AM

That's gorgeous Mike, I hope to be at least half as good.  I can't even tell that the deck is not part of the original kit.

  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Posted by 1943Mike on Friday, May 25, 2018 12:17 PM

laskdjn,

Thanks for the kind words.

I should also say that if you're going to paint the horizontal surfaces deck blue you might have less reason to add a wood deck. I did add a wood deck on my USS San Francisco and had painted it deck blue before attaching it. I don't have any close up images I can find at the moment but I must say, try as I did, it didn't turn out as I had hoped. That is probably because I wasn't sure how much deck wear might be revealed during its active duty and my idea of showing a little bit of wood under the paint just didn't work out as I'd hoped. Also, I'm not sure how much wear actually would have shown at any point in her active service ... probably not much if any.

Again, forgive the images but I thought you might like to see a botched, painted wood deck Big Smile.

 

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Friday, May 25, 2018 12:18 PM

I can't tell where you botched it.

  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Posted by 1943Mike on Friday, May 25, 2018 12:29 PM

If you click to enlarge the second to last image you'll see how I left some of the deck with the wood color showing through. I'm not convinced that is at all realistic.

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Friday, May 25, 2018 12:41 PM

Mike,

Both your HMS Dreadnought amd USS San Fransisco look great to me. Can you tell me what brand of wood deck you purchased for these kits?

 

EDIT: Sorry, laskdjn,  I did not mean to threadjack!

 Bruce

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Friday, May 25, 2018 4:45 PM

It's all good. Still looking for tips on building this behemoth, or building ships in general.  This is my first.

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by steve5 on Friday, May 25, 2018 4:45 PM

mike , you are way too hard on yourself , those are beautiful build's . I am going to have a go at one of these next , when I finish my victory . will look to you for guidence my friend , 

PS:- could you tell what thread you used for the rigging mate , please .

steve5

 

  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Posted by 1943Mike on Friday, May 25, 2018 6:46 PM

Bruce & Steve5,

Used Artwox wood decks for both models. Used EZline for the rigging on both.

My apologies to the OP for taking up so much space on this thread.

Looking forward to the WIP.

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    July, 2010
  • From: Tempe AZ
Posted by docidle on Friday, May 25, 2018 11:27 PM

laskdjn

My brother asked me to build one for him.  I just got through the hull, that was a bear.  What tips and lessons learned can y'all give me on the rest of the construction?  I had planned on going mostly OOB with the exception of Tom's Modelworks PE set.

 

For PE, I would recommend Eduard or Gold Medal PE over Tom’s. I like Eduard’s instructions and the weight/strength of Gold Medal. Tom’s is fine but not as forgiving as the other two when it comes to multiple attempts at glueing. Each set also has both details and railing In one package.

I would also recommend getting a wood deck for this model as there are three sections to the main deck and the seams can be difficult to hide. Personally, I prefer Pontos decks over ArtWok because the Pontos is a bit thinner and they come with decals for depth markers, etc. and Pontos has a Blue deck for this model.

The downsize with the wooden decks, can be as Bill says, bubbling with humidity, scale effect and the loss of or lessening height of deck details. Bollards, hatches, etc lose their look by jot standing as proud as they should. On the other hand, the edge of the wooden deck makes it easier when you are attaching the railingby giving you an edge to butt the railing up to.

That being said, it is easier now hiding seams with Perfect Plastic Putty since you can clean up excess putty with a wet q-tip, toothpick or a finger. 

Mike Ashey has a building manual on the this model which would be a great thing to have on this build. It’s available on evilBay here:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-350-SCALE-USS-NORTH-CAROLINA-BATTLESHIP-MODEL-MANUAL-BY-MIKE-ASHEY-PUBLISHING/273220005479?hash=item3f9d2e6e67:g:qd8AAOSwS3Za~ZSp

Hope this helps a bit. 

Steve

 

       

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2010
  • From: Tempe AZ
Posted by docidle on Friday, May 25, 2018 11:33 PM

1943Mike

I'm not a very good model builder but I enjoy the process (when I'm not cursing, taking God's name in vain, on my hands and knees trying to rend a PE part from the carpet monster, etc.). That having been said, I didn't sand off the plastic deck detail on my HMS Dreadnought or USS San Francisco when I put on wood decks. Fortunately the decks didn't compromise the builds by raising the deck height too much. As least I don't remember their having done so.

If you believe that the thickness of the aftermarket wood deck will make the build more difficult by adding its thickness, then by all means sand away. I just didn't find that to be a problem in my "hack" builds where I've used wood decks.

Forgive the photos of the Dreadnought. Just found them in an external HD - thought they were lost after the Photobucket debacle. I'm sure you will see many mistakes but I didn't think the placement of the wood deck over the existing detail made any negative difference.

 

 

Mike,

You don’t give yourself enough credit bud. These are beautifu! I do have to a question though. Is this Dreadnought a Trumpeter or Zvezda?

Steve

       

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Posted by 1943Mike on Saturday, May 26, 2018 12:03 AM

Steve,

It's the Trumpeter 1915.

BTW, Artwox also had a deck blue available if my memory serves me. I can't remember why I chose the regular wood deck... maybe my error in ordering? Don't recall. Anyway the thickness does matter so perhaps Pontos's deck would be a better bet.

Anyway thanks for the kind words.

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Saturday, May 26, 2018 5:05 PM

So, how is building a model ship different than building a plane or tank, besides the size difference? 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, May 26, 2018 5:21 PM

I think a lot of it has to do with scale.

There aren't any ship kits much larger than 1/72. Most of the bigger scale ones are 1/96 to 1/144.

And the smaller scales go from /1350 all the way to 1/2400.

Maritime models of boats in scales like 1/48 to 1/64 do compare to aircraft models in some ways.

In other words, it's safe to say that ship models have a lot of really small parts.

  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Posted by 1943Mike on Saturday, May 26, 2018 6:28 PM

To add to what Bill (GMorrison) said, you have to plan ahead as you always do for armor and aircraft but with, perhaps, more emphasis on the rigging. In general, with floaty things, one must allow for being able to attach rigging to its various points on the vessel. That gets more involved when building a sailing ship model but is pertinent for prop driven shiips as well - especially warships.

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Saturday, May 26, 2018 11:11 PM

But worth world war 2 vessels, rigging isn't as huge, right?   But basically, just like a plane or tank, but more planning? 

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, May 27, 2018 7:50 AM

Well; Laskdjn

 For the many ship applications I have , I do find EDUARD a superior product from outside the U.S.A . Locally I do prefer Gold Medal Models products . Both will give startingly great results if you excersize patience in the application thereof .

 I have NEVER used a wood deck . I may try one on a carrier . I understand many were stained deck blue during the war . Why spend extra bucks to paint it deck blue ?

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, May 27, 2018 7:59 AM

Mike ;

    I have always like the look of a wood deck in pre or post war ships . It makes them look , Well , more organized . Of course that might be because you did such a good job !

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Currently in the Dallas area
Posted by modelcrazy on Sunday, May 27, 2018 9:13 AM

I've used Tom's several times and yes you do need to resist the urge to pull your hair out sometimes. It just takes more research. Eduard IMO is the easiest since they show exactly which part to replace and where it is.

I have also used wood decks and I like them. Yes, the thickness issue can be a deterrent, but I've noticed that once everything is on you really don't notice it as much. I will wet the plastic deck with water prior to applying the wood decking to cut down on the bubbles. It sounds counterintuitive, but the glue will stick just fine afterward.

As far as rigging, there is a lot more than most think, but most of it can be omitted and still have rigging that looks complete. I will build the superstructure subassemblies first, paint and rigg prior to attaching them to the hull. This helps me from making a mess of things and I work my way out when adding PE or rigging.

I have the Carrol myself and am looking forward to it as soon as I get over my hesitation of that camo scheme. As far as accuracy, once it's done, my wife and I are pretty much the only ones who see it except for the pictures I would put on this and other forums. My step kids and grandkids wouldn't have a clue what the ship was used for or even what era it belonged anyway.

Looking forward to your build 

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/48 Tamiya Mk.1 Swordfish
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales
1/200 AMT Saturn V

In Que

Secret Santa gifts will move to the top after Christmas.

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Sunday, May 27, 2018 11:59 AM

Right now, my build is on pause while I wait for the Eduard photoetch set.  But I'll post pictures once I'm done.  I'm just hoping it's not awful

  • Member since
    March, 2004
  • From: Kincheloe Michigan
Posted by Mikeym_us on Sunday, May 27, 2018 2:38 PM

Try the wood hunter series of decks it comes with some PE and a long length of Anchor chain. And the deck is pretty thin and are made for Trumpeter kits.

modelcrazy

I've used Tom's several times and yes you do need to resist the urge to pull your hair out sometimes. It just takes more research. Eduard IMO is the easiest since they show exactly which part to replace and where it is.

I have also used wood decks and I like them. Yes, the thickness issue can be a deterrent, but I've noticed that once everything is on you really don't notice it as much. I will wet the plastic deck with water prior to applying the wood decking to cut down on the bubbles. It sounds counterintuitive, but the glue will stick just fine afterward.

As far as rigging, there is a lot more than most think, but most of it can be omitted and still have rigging that looks complete. I will build the superstructure subassemblies first, paint and rigg prior to attaching them to the hull. This helps me from making a mess of things and I work my way out when adding PE or rigging.

I have the Carrol myself and am looking forward to it as soon as I get over my hesitation of that camo scheme. As far as accuracy, once it's done, my wife and I are pretty much the only ones who see it except for the pictures I would put on this and other forums. My step kids and grandkids wouldn't have a clue what the ship was used for or even what era it belonged anyway.

Looking forward to your build 

 

On the workbench: Dragon 1/350 scale Ticonderoga class USS BunkerHill 1/720 scale Italeri USS Harry S. Truman 1/72 scale Encore Yak-6

The 71st Tactical Fighter Squadron the only Squadron to get an Air to Air kill and an Air to Ground kill in the same week with only a F-15   http://photobucket.com/albums/v332/Mikeym_us/

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Sunday, May 27, 2018 5:34 PM

This being my first ship, I think I'm gonna forego wood decks, and just do the eduard pe.

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Currently in the Dallas area
Posted by modelcrazy on Sunday, May 27, 2018 6:22 PM

That'll work.

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/48 Tamiya Mk.1 Swordfish
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales
1/200 AMT Saturn V

In Que

Secret Santa gifts will move to the top after Christmas.

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