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Nantucket Lightship Question

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  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Nantucket Lightship Question
Posted by fright on Tuesday, July 24, 2018 3:31 PM

I have decided to build Lindberg's 1:95 scale Nantucket lightship kit as my next project Confusedand I have three questions. If anyone has had experience with this kit, my questions are:

1) My two hulls seem slightly warped when fitting together. If I glue the two hull forms together to try and reshape the fit, would I still be able to slip into place the deck without snapping anything on the hull? 

2) Could anyone tell me what year is being represented with this Lindberg kit? Depending upon the year of vessel, I can get a better handle on the color scheme to be used.

3) Is the waterline color on vessel flat black or a dark blue? In some photos it appears bluish but others look black.

I am planning on installing led lighting for both of the lights on the masts and would also like to light the inside of cabins. Another reason why I want to install the decking last. In the directions, the diagram makes it look like The deck is glued to one side of hull, then adding the 2nd hull to complete. I had troupbe before using this method with Lindberg's Cap'n Kidd model kit. 

Any suggestions /comments greatly appreciated. 

Robert O

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, July 24, 2018 8:41 PM
  • Member since
    February, 2016
  • From: Western No. Carolina
Posted by gene1 on Tuesday, July 24, 2018 9:42 PM

Robert, Hi, how is your Constition? I have done a lot of what you want to do & I have always had luck on slipping the deck in after I glue the hull together. I glue just the keel to gether & clamp the rest together until I am ready to put the deck in. This lets you spread the top apart to fit in the deck. Try it out first with clamps to see if that works. 

   I got 2 packs of real good little clamps that really hold at Walmart.Clothes pins won't do. If you need help on lighting, talk to  luvspinball, he is a master at lighting & a nice guy too.

   Love to see pictures of your Connie.    Gene

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, July 24, 2018 10:14 PM

Nothing like test fitting.

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Wednesday, July 25, 2018 11:46 AM

GM - thanks for sending me this post. I looked at Der's build and it's looking great so far and there is some good feedback obout this vessel. On his version so far, he has the entire lower hull painted a dark blue or black. I have looked at several videos on Youtube of the Nantucket and it looks as if there is a dark blue or black waterline stripe and then lower hull is back to a red. Not sure of the years on some of these posts and the current Nantucket was redone to be used either as a private party boat or to be used as a historical educational vessel.

I have tried to look up USCG colors for lightships but there is no mention as to what color the waterline was painted (if any). Depending on the waterline color, I'm going with Model Masters Guard Red for upper hull and Oxide Red for lower hull. Flat black with waterline so far.

Thanks for posting this sight to me and I will try my hand at using the PE ladders that Der used as well. Cheers!

Robert O

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Wednesday, July 25, 2018 12:00 PM

Gene1 - Hello and good to hear from you! Your Galleon looks GREAT!!! Job well done!!! As for my Connie, she's still on a back burner. I finally finished my 1st wooden build of the Bluenose by Scientific (an old 60's kit). That's what got me sidetracked from the Connie but I did need to step away for a while. I also had some serious health issues back in October .

Thanks for the advice on the hull. The instructions on this kit is only pictures with very little directions to follow. I'd like to get the hull together so I can putty and paint any seams between the two halves. I then need to figure out the type of base I will use and drill for 9v led lighting to hide inside hull. Battery pack will be hidden somehow in my base. here's a pic of my Bluenose, minus the flag and name on bow and stern (purchasing a new printer that will allow me to make decals and iron-on transfers).

Robert O

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Wednesday, July 25, 2018 12:11 PM

Here's a couple of pics: one taken in 1975 and the other in 2016

 

 

Robert O

  • Member since
    July, 2018
  • From: North of Boston
Posted by Lightship Alley on Wednesday, July 25, 2018 7:42 PM

The model represents prior to 1960. The stack is tall for Steam engine. In 1960 the Stack was shortened for a Cooper-Bessemer Diesel engine. 

 The bottom of the hull is flat black just like real bottom paint. 

I am on the BOD for that NANTUCKET Lightship. Built in 1936. Largest US Lightship ever built, currently berthed in East Boston, Ma. Open for tours on Saturdays. 

 I have photos of everything inside and out. Many are on my FB page Lightship Alley or USCG Lightship Sailors Page.

Ron J.

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Thursday, July 26, 2018 11:29 AM

Ron J. - Thank you for this posting and giving me the correct time period on this model kit. I will try to stay correct with color scheme. Can you clarify one thing for me regarding the painting on the lower hull? For prior 1960 paint, was it Coast Guard Red upper and solid flat black from waterline to bottom of hull and no other red used? 

In the photo on your Lightship Alley page, it appears that all air vents and stack were painted flat black. At that time, the two small boats onboard used the same red as the ship's hull.

Thank you for your information and dedication to these wonderful ships and for sharing your website. Cheers!!!

 

 

 

Robert O

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, July 26, 2018 12:15 PM

Lightship Alley ;

 Hi ! I have always been interested in this vessel , especially when she was steam . Now a question .

   Wasn't there a time when Lightships were not powered , but stationed and four anchors put out like an oil rig or research ship and then the crew was transported by launches for crew changes ?

 It seems to me , as many that got run over by ships , that hazard pay was common , or not ? T.B.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Derry, New Hampshire, USA
Posted by rcboater on Saturday, July 28, 2018 10:50 AM

Robert,

I built this kit back in 2011, and converted it to RC.  Here’s a link to my build thread:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?1454224-Lightship-Nantucket-%28LV-112%29-Build-Thread

I used LEDs for both running lights (when underway) and the Beacon (when anchored on station).  

I cut the deck into fore and aft halves. That allowed me to install the fore deck first, with  pilot house and foremast and still have access to the interior for wiring, etc.

I used a Bakatronics lighthouse controller for the masthead beacon. It is sold as an accessory for an HO or N scale train layout- it gives a convincing lighthouse effect.

Details on my conversion and lighting plan are in the build thread...

As others have pointed out, the kit represents the ship before her conversion from stream to diesel in the early 60s.   Please note that the color scheme on the Lindberg box art is wrong-  the deckhouses should be white, not Spar (the USCG buff color, FS 10371).

-Bill

Webmaster, IPMS Patriot Chapter  www.ipmspatriot.org

Billerica, MA

 

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Saturday, July 28, 2018 12:21 PM

Bill - thanks for your feedback on the led lighting and the Bakatronics controller. I will research that item and take a look at your rc buildas well. Many thanks and a good weekend!

Robert O

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Derry, New Hampshire, USA
Posted by rcboater on Thursday, August 02, 2018 9:52 AM

Here is the info on the animating the beacon, taken from post #15 in my rcgroups.com build thread:

I found a great little solution for the masthead beacon.  

Most LEDs have a limited viewing angle-- you need to look at them end-on to get the full brightness. Thirty or 45 degree LEDs are common. 

www.superbrightLEDs.com has an all-around white LED- they call it a 360 degree LED, though it is really more like 350 degrees because of the base. It is perfect for this application-- a 5mm white LED, that I can mount as the beacon on top of the mast. I've tested this LED--- it throws a lot of light.

I also found a great flasher circuit-- Bakatronics makes a unit designed to drive an LED to simulate a lighthouse beacon in an HO or N scale Lighthouse. It came as simple little kit-- it took me about 15 minutes (max) to assemble. Here's a link to their webpage-- they have a little video that shows it in action:  http://www.bakatronics.com/shop/item.aspx?itemid=575

 

 

Webmaster, IPMS Patriot Chapter  www.ipmspatriot.org

Billerica, MA

 

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Tuesday, August 07, 2018 10:30 AM

Bill - thanks for sending me these additional links on the LED's and the Bakatronics contoller. I like the word 'simple' when it comes to electrical wiring LOL . Thanks again!!!

 

Robert O

  • Member since
    July, 2018
  • From: North of Boston
Posted by Lightship Alley on Sunday, August 19, 2018 9:14 PM

Sorry for late reply. Yes, in the 1800’s there were no powered Lightships. Whale oil was used to light the multiple lanterns. There were many lanterns mounted on a ring similar to a wagon wheel mounted to each mast. The ring would be lowered into deck houses during the day to clean the Lens/globes and hoisted up at night. 

Each was anchored by a single Mushroom type anchor, with a back up if they lost one or broke anchor chain in a storm. 

Manned 24/7 crews would alternate, sometimes 30 days, later in the 20th century 3 weeks on 1 off.   Yes launches, Buoy Tenders, even Fishing Vessels for transportation.

many were struck by passing Liners, some Sunk.  1934 The Olympic , sistervof the Titanic hit the LV 117 NANTUCKET Lightship and sunk it. 4 Survivors. 1 Body recovered. 4 gone with Ship...   The LV 112 NANTUCKET was paid for by the Brits,  built in Delaware , largest U.S. Lightship ever built at just shy of 150’.  She is a Museum Ship berthed at the East Boston Shipyard & Marina in East Boston Ma. Open during Season on Saturdays 11-4ish.

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Monday, August 20, 2018 11:28 AM

LightShip Alley - thank again for the great tips on lighting and your insights into the history of these 'unknown' heroes!Yes

Robert O

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 9:25 AM

Ron J. - I am wondering if you can clarify something for me on the superstructures on the Nantucket? In this Lindberg model, there is a small structure that has an a frame roof with two hatches on each side. Lindberg's directions give no written instructions (only numbers) as to what this small structure is. From all of the photos that I have seen of the actual ship, all of the superstructures have flat roofs (decks). Am I overlooking something in the photos or is this an error on Lindberg's part?

Also, can you tell me where the decks atop of the superstructures painted white or gray like the main deck?

I am trying to look up anything about this ship online and Youtube videos for my build on this kit. Thank you for any information that you can provide to me on this subject. Wink

Robert O

  • Member since
    October, 2010
  • From: Rockford, IL
Posted by AlanF on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 10:28 AM

Here are a few pictures I took last summer (2017) in Boston.  I hope they help.

 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 10:34 AM

Hi,

If you are talking about the small structure at the far left of the image below, I believe that is the engine room skylight, which appears to have been removed when the ship was converted to diesel (as shown in the 2nd image).

Model

http://www.lightshipmodeler.iwarp.com/photo3.html

HNSA

http://www.hnsa.org/hnsa-ships/lightship-nantucket-lv-112-then-wal-534/gallery/

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 11:04 AM

Alan F - thanks for sharing these pictures. Very kind of you and I will keep these for referrence! Cheers!!!Yes

Robert O

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 11:07 AM

PFJN - Yes, thank you for letting me know what this structure was and for the time period. So many of the photos that are available are of the post-1960 conversion. Thanks again for posting these sites to me and for answering my question. Cheers!!! Toast

Robert O

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 11:39 AM

Yers, that is/ was the engine room skylight.

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 12:48 PM

GMorrison - once again, thanks for the clarification as to what this smaller structure was. Toast In that case, I plan to go with all white for this one structure.

More and more, it looks like the makers of models are using strictly this number system for their directions. I know it's a Universal way of doing things and probably helps cut down costs on printing, but is a poor excuse in helping a modeler learn what the name of the parts are and learning about the model being built. ARGH !!!!

Robert O

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 1:00 PM

I once found a database that had drawings of a lot of Coast Guard boats. Don't remember if this was one of them. I need to find it again.

I have this model in the stash. It's pretty crude, don't you think? Look forward to what you do with her.

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 7:11 PM

Out of curiosity, was it just a rotating beacon, or was there a distinct flash timing?

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 8:08 PM

Once the lamps changed from animal oil to acetylene, and later electricity, they usually were isophase flashes/ equal interval on-off. Whether the phases were different from ship to ship I have no idea. It's also my understanding that the range was pretty grossly overstated, in single digit mile distances. But there were also bells and foghorns, and those carry quite a ways, even in fog.

You can really get in the weeds studying the lightship baskets. There's a good museum about them on the island.

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Thursday, August 23, 2018 10:28 AM

I found this photo of the Nantucket while she was in drydock in 2011. This photo clearly shows the black waterline strip running between two rub rails. At the very bottom of the hull is a 'stabalizer fin' that runs horizontal to keel. I will try to duplicate the missing 2nd rub rail with a strip of styrene on my vessel. 

Thanks to AlanF's photo that he shared with me (shown below), there are 7 round openings that run along the top of the black strip that are not on the Lindberg hull. I'm not sure if these are water intake or bilge drains, but I plan to drill these openings into my hull. I was thinking about possibly using a round styrene tube to create the port openins for these holes. 

Robert O

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, August 23, 2018 12:01 PM

The ship as set up in the photo isn't the same as the era you are building, so I personally wouldn't add those openings, on the off chance that Lindberg had drawings of the older version and they weren't there.

Just seems like added work. The black stripe is a boot stripe.

Yes, sections of tube make good, if somewhat heavy port frames. A good task for a "Chopper" tool.

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Atlanta Metro, Georgia
Posted by fright on Thursday, August 23, 2018 12:33 PM

GMorrison - thanks for the terminology on the stripe! I'll learn this stuff yet LOL That's all the more reason why model companies should add the names of what parts are that are going on a ship! To give people like myself a fighting chance to learn something.

As for the openings along the lower hull, I'll hold off and try to find some older photos of the hull that are clear images (which are hard to find and often very dark which hides detail). I have zip-diddly-squat knowledge on how a ship of this nature would cool it's engine(s), but I know on my father-in-law's 36' sailboat that it drew in sea water and would expel the water out of an opening on the stern above the water line. So I'll have to hold off and do more research rather than guess at it like you pointed out. Thanks for th tips and feedback Wink Greatly appreciated !!!!

The U.S. Nantucket Lightship / LV-112 was built by Pusey & Jones Shipbuilders in 1936 at Wilmington, Delaware, as a steam-propelled vessel with a compound reciprocating engine that included two oil fired Babcock-Wilcox water tube boilers, producing a maximum speed of 12 knots. 

 

Robert O

  • Member since
    July, 2018
  • From: North of Boston
Posted by Lightship Alley on Thursday, August 23, 2018 6:39 PM

The small frame roof , like windows on each side, was located between the Stack and the Fog Horn Room, (the middle structure) That was removed in 1960 when thecStack was shortened do To a Diesel Engine installed. The Lip of that hatch or skylight still exists but with a flat steel plate welded on it. Nextvto that there is also a winch mounted to the deck.

‘All the rooftops are painted the same as the deck color today.

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