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Lindberg's Clermont.

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  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Lindberg's Clermont.
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, February 07, 2019 2:29 PM

I know, it was reallly called the North River, and that is what I'll put on the model, but for those looking for the kit, I wanted to use Lindberg's name.  Here is what I've done so far.  It seems to be fairly accurate as far as what anyone knows what it really looked like.  It does look like a replica built in 1906, and some of the paintings and drawings.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, February 07, 2019 4:30 PM

Hi Don !

 I actually built the motorized version because a non- motorized version wasn't available .Didn't run to bad either ! I still have problems with the bow area .I think the Bow area was a somewhat smoother angle than what the model represents .

  • Member since
    March, 2009
  • From: brisbane australia
Posted by surfsup on Thursday, February 07, 2019 10:57 PM

Look forward to this. Something different.....Cheers mark

If i was your wife, i'd poison your tea! If Iwas your husband, I would drink it! WINSTON CHURCHILL
  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, February 08, 2019 9:35 AM

Tanker - Builder

Hi Don !

 I actually built the motorized version because a non- motorized version wasn't available .Didn't run to bad either ! I still have problems with the bow area .I think the Bow area was a somewhat smoother angle than what the model represents .

 

I wondered about that bow too, but both text and paintings seem to agree with kit.  Also, I believe the 1907 replica features that style bow.  I found a few discrepancies in the drive, but I suppose some liberties were taken to allow the electric motor drive in the kit.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, February 10, 2019 8:32 AM

Ah ;

 You may be right . I always thought that he had the hull built by a bunch of guys that built barns ! Certainly didn't use any shipwrights did he ?

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, February 11, 2019 9:06 AM

Tanker - Builder

Ah ;

 You may be right . I always thought that he had the hull built by a bunch of guys that built barns ! Certainly didn't use any shipwrights did he ?

 

Yes. he did use a real shipyard.  But he told them to simiplify design because it would not be sea-going.  US rivercraft were often build to weird shapes, as in the Western Rivers steamers.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 9:28 AM

Okay, got the machinery installed, the deck on, and the deckhouses.  Now I have to do the railings, deck hardware, and spars and rigging.  Also, do the real base- what is on now is a temporary building base.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Philadelphia Pa
Posted by Nino on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 2:39 PM

Don,
 Looking good!   That's a fun kit.
 There are dozens of interpretations of the North River Steamboat.  Way back in 2015  I started some research on it using the Library and internet. I also looked thru several forums.  I recall you were on several of the FSM posts.
 
     There are correct plans of the engine but no so-called "plans" of the ship which can be authenticated. It is another one of those "nobody knows for sure".
 
    The Lindberg and the ITC kits do have a nice representation of the engine.  Since Lindberg's actually "works" it is the better kit to build.   Of course it is the only kit out there these days.
 
     With my research I always felt the Lindberg kit seemed closer to an 1807 version whereas the old ITC kit seems much closer to the 1909 replica that was made.   If course, with no good plans in existence, we can't know for sure.
 
A tid-bit of History:
    "...Professor Renwick, describing the "Clermont" of 1807 as she appeared on her first trip, says: "She was very unlike any of her successors, and very dissimilar from the shape in which she appeared a few months afterward. With a model resembling a Long Island skiff, she was decked for a short distance at stem and stern. The engine was open to view, and from the engine aft a house like that of a canal boat was raised to cover the Boiler and the apartment for the officers. There were no wheel-guards. The rudder was of the shape used in sailing-vessels, and moved by a tiller. The boiler was of the form then used in Watt's engines, and was set in masonry. The condenser was of the size used habitually in land engines, and stood, as was the practice in them, in a large cold-water cistern. The weight of the masonry and the great capacity of the cold-water cistern diminished, very materially, the buoyancy of the vessel. The rudder had so little power that she could hardly be managed. The skippers of the river craft, who at once saw that their business was doomed, took advantage of the unwieldiness of the vessel to run afoul of her as soon as they thought they had the law on their side. Thus, in several instances, the steamer reached one or the other termini of the route with but a single wheel."
And, of Course...
 
 Thanks for sharing .
 
     Nino
 

 

 

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